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Full text of "Catalogue .."

i^ 




ll E) RARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

or ILLINOIS 

C 
X£6nH 
1915/16-1917/18 






ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL 
rVERSITY ^ NORMAL, ILL. 



The 



3RMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERIES 14 NUMBER 60 

July; 1916 



CONTAINING THE 



FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 1916-17 



PUBLISHT IN JULY, OCTOBER. 
JANUARY & APRIL, EACH YEAR 



, ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL 
IVERSITY ^ NORMAL, ILL. 



The 
ORMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERIES 14 NUMBER 60 

JULY, 1916 



COISTAIMNG THE 

FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 1916-17 



PUBLISHT IN JULY, OCTOBER, 
JANUARY & APRIL, EACH YEAR 



Whenever two spellings of a 
word are authorized by the New 
International or the New Stand- 
ard Dictionary, it is the practis 
of the State Normal University 
to use in its publications the 
shorter form. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 



CHARLES L. GAPEN, Bloomington, President 
FRANCIS G. BLAIR, Springfield, 
Ex-Officio Member and Secretary 



E. R. E. KIMBROUGH, Danville 

J. STANLEY BROWN, Joliet 

FRANK B. STITT, El Paso 

WILLIAM P. WALL, Staunton 

JOHN J. AMSLER, East Peoria 

ADRIAN M. DOOLIN, Chicago 

SILAS ECHOLS, Mt. Vernon 

A. R. SMITH, Quincy 

GUSTAVE BALTZ, Millstadt 

HENRY HOFF, Germantown 

JOHN L. BRUMMERSTEDT, Altamont 

GEORGE W. HUGHES, Hume 

HENRY OAKES, Bluffs 



F. D. MARQUIS, Bloomington, 
Tresurer 



CALENDAR FOR 1916—17 

The school year of forty-eight weeks is divided into three 
terms of twelv weeks each, and two summer terms of six weeks 
each. A mid-spring term of six weeks runs parallel to the last 
half of the spring term. 

Summer Session, 1916 

Monday, June 12— First Term begins. 
Monday, July 24— Second Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 30— Second Term ends. 

Fall Term, 1916 

Monday, September 4— Opening of Training School. 
Monday, September 11— Fall Term begins, Normal and High 

School Departments. 
Friday, December 1— Fall Term ends. 

Winter Term, 1916—17 

Monday, December 4 — Winter Term begins. 

Wednesday, December 20— Semi-annual Meeting of the Board 
of Education. 

Wednesday, December 20— Annual Contest of the Literary So- 
cieties. 

Thursday, December 21— Recess of two weeks. 

Wednesday, January 3, 1917— Winter Term resumes. 

Saturday, February 17— Founders' Day Celebration. 

Saturday, February 24— Annual Contest in Oratory. 

Thursday, March 8— End of Winter Term. 

Vacation of ten days. 

Spring Term, 1917 

Monday, March 19— Spring Term begins. 
Friday, April 27— Oshkosh-Terre Haute-Normal Debate. 
Monday, April 30— Mid-Spring Term begins. 
Friday, May 25— Junior Class Play. 

Wednesday, June 6— Annual Meeting of the Board of Edu- 
cation. 
Thursday, June 7 — Annual Commencement Exercises. 

Summer Session, 1917 

Monday, June 11— First Summer Term begins. 
Monday, July 23— Second Summer Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 29— Second Summer Term ends. 
Monday, September 10— Beginning of Fall Term of year 
1917-18. 



FACULTY 



DAVID FELMLEY, A. B., LL.D., President 

HENRY Mccormick. Ph. D.. LL.D., Vice-Presidcnt, Emeritus, 

ORSON LEROY MANCHESTER, A. M., LL.D., Dean. 

Professor of Languages and Economics. 

J. ROSE COLBY, Ph.D., 

Professor of Literature. 

MANFRED JAMES HOLMES, B. L., 

Professor of Pedagogy and History of Education. 

FREDERICK DELOS BARBER, A. M.. 

Professor of Phvsics. 

GEORGE HENRY HOWE, Ph. D., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

FRANK WILLIAM WESTHOFF, 

Professor of Music. 

DOUGLAS CLAY RHDGLEY, A. B... 

Professor of Geografy. 
EDWIN ARTHUR TURT«IER, A. M.. 
Director of the Training School. 
JOHN LOSSEN PRICER, A. M.. 
Professor of Biological Science. 
ADNAH CLIFTON NEWELL, B. S., 
Director of Manual Training. 
WILLIAM ANDREW LAWRENCE BEYER, A. M., 
Professor of Political Science. 
HARVEY ANDREW PETERSON, Ph. D., 
Professor of Psychology. 
HOWARD WILLIAM ADAMS, B. S., 
Professor of Chemistry. 
HARRY ALBERT McGILL, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

IRWIN ARTHUR MADDEN, B. S., 

Professor of Agriculture. 

HERMANN HENRY SCHROEDER, Ph. B., 

Professor of Education. 

CHESTER MILTON SANFORD. A. B.. 

Professor of Public Speaking. 

CLARISSA ELIZABETH ELA, 

Teacher of Art. 

ELMER WARREN CAVINS, 

Teacher of Penmanship and Orthografy. 

ALICE JEAN PATTERSON, S. B., 

Teacher of Nature Study. 

OLIVE LILLIAN BARTON, A. B., 

Assistant in Mathematics and Dean of Women. 

GRACE ARLINGTON OWEN, A. M., 

Teacher of Reading. 

KITURAH PARSONS, 

Teacher of Houseliold Science. 



FACULTY (Continued.) 



EDITH IRENE ATKIN, A. B., 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

HENRY HARRISON RUSSELL, 

Director of Physical Education for Men. 

LILLIAN KEAL SABINE, A. B., 

ELIZABETH MAVITY CUNNINGHAM, 

GRACE THOMASMA, A. B., 

Teachers of Rhetoric. 

CLARA MAUDE PENSTONE, Ph. B., 

Teacher of Grammar. 

ANNETTA BELLE COOPER, B. Ed., 

Assistant in Household Art. 

JESSIE ISA LUMMIS, A. B., 

HERMAN G. MILBRADT, A. B., 

Teacher of Latin. 

Teacher of German. 

MERTON JOSEPH LYON, 

Assistant in Manual Training. 

ANNA ELIZABETH SWAINSON, A. M., 

Teacher of Design. 

CORA IRENE DAVIS, Ph. B., 

Director of Household Art. 

MABEL CLAIRE STARK, S. B., 

Assistant in Geografy. 

EDGAR PACKARD, 

Director of Country School Department 

HAROLD FRANCIS JAMES, 

Director of Art. 

ARTHUR ROWLAND WILLIAMS, A. B., 

Director of Commercial Department. 

AUSTIN ELGIN WILBUR, A. B., 

Director of Extension Department. 

EDNA FLORENCE COITH, B. S., 

Assistant in Household Science. 

WILLIAM HEIN, M. S., 

Teacher of Zoology. 

WINFIELD SCOTT, B. S., 

Teacher of Agriculture. 

MINERVA COOK HALL, 

Assistant in Music. 

LYDIA CLARK, 

Director of Gymnastics for Women. 

ANNA BLAKE, B. S., 

Teacher of Physiology. 

GERTRUDE BAKER, 

Assistant in Physical Education. 

VERLE SELLS, A. B., 

Teacher of Shorthand and Typewriting. 

ETHEL OLDAKER, 

Teacher of Penmanship. 



1 1 I :^//<(:p 



FACULTY (Continued) 



RALPH W. PRINGLE, A. M.. 

Principal of the High School. 

ALMA MARY HAMILTON, A. M., 

FRANCES MILTON MOREHOUSE, A. M. 

THOMAS M. BARGER, B. S.. 

Teachers in the High School. 

GEORGE NEWTON CADE, 

Principal of the Training School. 

AGNES GROVES STORIE, B. S., 

Training Teacher, Eighth Grade. 

LORA MARY DEXHEIMER. 

Training Teacher, Sixth Grade. 

MARY EVANGELINE ROBB, 

Training Teacher, Fifth Grade. 

JESSIE MAY DILLON, 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. 

IDELLA RETTENA BERRY, B. S.. 

Training Teacher, Third Grade. 

LURA MARY EYESTONE, B. S., 

Training Teacher, Second Grade. 

NELLIE CATHERINE THOMPSON, 

Training Teacher, First Grade. 

MARGARET E. LEE, 

Director of the Kindergarten. 

CONSTANCE SMITH, 

Assistant in the Kindergarten. 

THOMAS BILLINGS. 

Gardener. 

ANGELINE VERNON MILNER. 

Librarian. 

LILLIAN HAVENHILL, A. B.. 

GERTRUDE ANDREWS, 

EDNA KELLY, 

Assistant Librarians. 

FLORA PENNELL DODGE, 

LOTTIE LAVONNE HAYES. 

Stenografers. 

KATHERINE CARSTAIRS, 

Registrar. 

JENNIE TURNER, 

Clerk. 



Elxtra Teachers Employed for Summer Session, 

LOUIS AUGUSTUS PECHSTEIN, A. B., B. S. 
HARRY AMBROSE PERRIN, 
/ Education. 

EDWIN R. SPENCER, B. S., 

ALMA JESSIE NEILL, A. M., 

CYRUS WILLIAM LANTZ, A. M., 

HARRY DWIGHT WAGGONER, A. B., 

RALPH HARLAN LINKINS, A. M., 

Biology. 

WILLIAM LUTHER GOBLE, B. S., 

GEORGE DOUGLAS MOUNCE, B. S., 

Physical Science. 

HENRY HUGH EDMUNDS, 

WILLIAM WRIGHT McCULLOCH, 

JOHN ARTHUR STRONG. B. Ed., 

WILLIAM HAWKES, A. B., 

HARVEY TRIMBLE WHITE, 

ISAAC NEWTON WARNER, B. S., 

DANIEL HANNON, 

Mathematics. 

ANTHONETTE DURANT, A. B., 

ROBERTA LEE DAVIS, 

English Grammar. 

MENDEL EVERETT BRANOM. A. M.. 

Gcografy. 

HUGH ALVIN BONE, 

FLORENCE BULLOCK, A. B., 

History and Civics. 

KATHERINE E. FORSTER, A. B., 

ESSIE CHAMBERLAIN. Ph. B.. 

Literature. 

HERBERT ALLEN McKEAN, A. M., 

Manual Training. 

NAANA LYNN FORBES, 

Reading. 

MARTIN FRANCIS GLEASON, 

LAURA VAN PAPPELENDAM, 

RUTH UPHAM, 

Art Instruction. 

RUTH VIRGINIA SIMPSON, 

MYRTLE FERGUSON, 

Household Science, 
LAURA MAE HO UK, 

Music. 

MARY EMILY SMITH, 

The Training School. 



FACULT Y COMM ITTEES 

Alumni— Mr. Pricer, Miss Penstone, Miss Cooper. 

Athletics— Mr. Russell, Mr. Holmes, Mr. i^yon. 

Auditing— Mr. Adams, Miss Atkin, Mr. Gavins. 

Bildings— Mr. Newell, Mr. James, Miss Ela, Mr. Cade. 

Bulletins and Printing— Mr. Holmes, Miss Sabine, Mr. Williams. 

Campus— Mr. Pricer, Miss Patterson, Mr. Hein. 

Christian Work — Miss Atkin, Mr. Adams, Miss Barton, Miss Dillon. 

Course of Study— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Howe, Miss Colby. 

Disciplin— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Russell, Miss Barton, Miss Colby, 

Mr. Howe. 
Entertainments— Mr. Ridgley, Miss Atkin, Miss Stark. 
Faculty Club Programs— Miss Lummis. 
Faculty Receptions— Miss Thompson, Miss Parsons, Miss Baker, 

Mr. Howe. 
General Exercises— Mr. Sanford, Miss Sabine, Miss Hall, Miss 

Berry, Miss Owen. 
Graduating Exercises— Miss Ela, Mr. Adams, Mr. Lyon, Miss Owen. 
Lecture Association— Mr. Westhoff, Mr. Peterson, Miss Owen. 
Library— Mr. Schroeder, Mr. McGill, Miss Colby, Mr. Ridgley, Miss 

Penstone. 
Music— Mr. Westhoff, Miss Hall, Mr. Newell. 
Oratorical Association— Mr. Sanford, Mr. Beyer, Mr. Lyon, Mr. 

McGill. ,^ ,,. T „ uri 

Parents' Meetings— Miss Eyestone, Miss Robb, Miss Lee, Mr. Mil- 

bradt. 

Playground — Miss Smith, Mr. Cade, Miss Clark. 

Publicity— Mr. Ridgley, Mr. Williams, Miss Sells. 

Reception of New Students— Mr. Westhoff, Miss Penstone, Miss 
Coith, Miss Swainson. 

Records— Mr. Cavins, Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes. 

Recommendations — Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes, Miss Eyestone. 

Social Life — Miss Lummis, Miss Swainson, Miss Davis. 

Student Activities— Mr. Adams, Mr. Howe, Miss Clark. 

Student Loan Fund— Mr. Cavins, Mr. Barger, Mr. Scott. 

Student Programs — Mr. Manchester, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, Mr. 
Howe, Mr. Beyer, Mr. Peterson, Miss Barton. 

Student Publications— Miss Sabine, Mr. Beyer, Miss Morehouse. 

Student Welfare— Miss Barton, Mr. Cavins, Mr. Russell, Miss 
Clarke, Miss Blake. 

Teachers College— Mr. Pricer, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Ridg- 
ley, Mr. Beyer, Mr. Schroeder. 

Training School — Mr. Turner, Miss Dexheimer, Mr. Howe, Miss 
Berry. 

Philadelphian Society— Miss Stark, Mr. Cavins, Mr. Westhoff. 

Wrightonian Society — Mr. Beyer, Mr. Cade, Miss Hall. 

Ciceronian Society — Mr. McGill, Mr. Barger, Mr. Scott. 

Girls' Debating Club — Miss Lummis, Miss Atkin, Miss Blake. 

Country Life Club— Mr. Packard, Mr. Madden, Miss Patterson. 
The President is ex-officio a member of all committees. 






I 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



np HE ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY was founded 
-■^ by the General Assembly February 18, 1857, to prepare teach- 
ers for the public schools of Illinois. The School was opend Oc- 
tober 5, 1857, in Majors Hall in Bloomington with three teachers 
and nineteen students. It was the first state normal school in the 
Mississippi Valley. In 1860 the school was removed to its new 
quarters, then the finest normal school bilding in the United States. 
This structure had been erected at a cost of $120,000, of which 
$65,000 was paid by the state. The city of Bloomington and county 
of McLean had contributed in lands and money $141,000. 

In 1891 a training school bilding was erected, a library and 
gymnasium in 1896, a plant house in 1905, a manual arts bilding 
and auditorium in 1909, a new bilding to house the Training School 
and the University High School in 1913, a modern heating plant 
in 1916. The present value of the bildings, grounds, and equip- 
ment is not less than $700,000. 

For fifty-three years the state normal school has been doing 
the work for which it was establisht. Of its twenty-six thousand 
students nearly all have taught some time in the schools of Illinois. 
Its graduates are to be found in almost every state from Boston to 
the Golden Gate. Many have atiaind the highest eminence in edu- 
cational work. The yearly demand for teachers who hav receivd 
their training in this school is much larger than can be supplied. 

From 1860 until 1895 a high school was maintaind as a de- 
partment of the Model School. Its thoro instruction in the an- 
cient languages won high reputation. In 1906 the high school 
was restored, but its- chief emfasis is now laid upon modern science, 
agriculture, commerce and the manual arts. In 1908 was estab- 
lisht a Teachers College with four-year courses leading to a pro- 
fessional degree. 

The Normal University has expanded with the growth of the 
public school system. While normal schools are not the exclusiv 
agency for the training of teachers, yet they are the state's chief 
agents, and as such they must bild up the professional spirit, es- 
tablish the standards, create the ideals, send out the men and 
women whose call is to educational leadership. 

The ordinary income of the institution has now reacht 
$170,000. Its regular faculty numbers sixty-one teachers. Its 
annual enrollment 2815 students, besides 248 in the high school 
and 565 in the model school. Its courses of study hav multi- 
plied to meet the varying needs of students, and to train special 
teachers of art, music, household science, manual training, agri- 
culture, and commercial branches. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 11 

LOCATION 

The Normal University is located at Normal, a town of 4000 
inhabitants at the intersection of the Chicago & Alton and Illi- 
nois Central Railroads. The situation is helthful, the site high 
and well draind; the town is provided with excellent water, 
sewers, paved streets, gas, and electric lights. Commodious homes 
and boarding houses for 800 students stand within easy walking 
distance of the school. Normal is a very desirable place of resi- 
dence for people who value educational advantages. The charter 
provides that intoxicating liquors shall never be sold within the 
limits of the town. An electric railway, with cars every ten min- 
utes, connects Normal with Bloomington, two miles to the south. 
HOW TO REACH NORMAL 

The Illinois Central and the Chicago & Alton are the only 
railroads in Normal. Whenever it is possible, students on other 
lines should buy their tickets and check their baggage thru to 
Normal. Students coming to Bloomington on the Big Four or 
Lake Erie & Western are advized to check their baggage to the 
Chicago & Alton Junction in Bloomington; they may then leave 
the train at this station and recheck their baggage to Normal at 
a cost of six cents, the price of a ticket to Normal. 

Students coming to Bloomington on the limited trains of the 
Chicago & Alton, the Big Four, the Lake Erie & Western, or 
the interurban lines of the Illinois Traction System may reach 
Normal by street cars. These run from all railroad stations to 
the Court House square, whence a transfer may be taken to the 
Park Street-South Main or Fell Avenue cars, which run to the 
Normal University. 

The fee for delivering baggage from Normal station is twenty- 
flve cents; from Bloomington fifty to seventy-five cents. Baggage 
should bear a card with the owner's name and address. 

BILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Main Bilding, an imposing edifis 100x160 feet, sur- 
mounted by a clock tower, contains the main offises and reception 
rooms, the study hall, the society halls, and sixteen class rooms. 

The Gymnasium Bilding, 100x125 feet, constructed of Bed- 
ford limestone, contains on the first lloor the gymnasium, baths, 
and dressing rooms; on the second fioor rooms for the commer- 
cial department; on the third floor the biological laboratories and 
musimm. 

The Library Bilding is a substantial brick structure, 80x96 
feet. It contains rooms for the department of geografy, and a 
lecture room, besides the various rooms used for library pur- 
poses. The handsome reading room, airy, well-lighted, and con- 
venient, occupies the entire second floor. 



12 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The Manual Arts Bilding contains a modern auditorium with 
seating for 1115 persons, a science lecture room, three laboratories 
for chemistry and physics, four rooms for domestic economy, 
three for the art department, and six for manual training, besides 
offises and storerooms. This bilding is provided with ample equip- 
ment for the preparation of special teachers of these branches. 

The new Thomas Metcalf Bilding contains a high school as- 
sembly room 48x72 feet, with five high-school class rooms, eight 
schoolrooms and eight class rooms for the elementary school, a 
kindergarten 28x70, laboratories for agriculture and natural sci- 
ence, four rooms for domestic science, twelv ofTises, play rooms 
and rest rooms. It is a model bilding in all its hygienic and sani- 
tary arrangements. 

The physical and chemical laboratories are supplied with 
modern equipment and a good stock of apparatus adapted to the 
needs of advanst students. 

The psychological laboratory is provided with an abundance 
of appliances for experiment and demonstration. 

The department of biology, because of the former location 
here of the State Museum of Natural History, has at its disposal 
a working collection of zoological and botanical material much 
larger than that found at similar institutions. The laboratories 
are equipt with forty-eight compound microscopes of modern 
type, and apparatus for the preparation of permanent micro- 
scopic mounts of plant and animal tissues. The equipment for 
human physiology is exceptionally ample. The greenhouses are 
a valuable asset in connection with the work in botany, and now 
apparatus for experiments in plant life is used here by students 
preparing to teach botany in higher schools. An ample supply of 
field glasses is provided for bird study. 

The geografical equipment includes relief models of the 
United States and Europe, a complete set of Sydow-Habenicht 
relief maps, charts of the United States topografic, coast and 
geodetic surveys, a collection of rocks, minerals and other speci- 
mens, meteorological instruments, numerous exhibits illustrating 
industrial topics, and a large collection of pictures relating to 
this subject, including several thousand stereugrafs and stere- 
opticon slides. 

A school garden of two and one-fourth acres, and a spacious 
greenhouse in care of an experienced gardener, afford excellent 
facilities for experiment and instruction in horticulture and flori- 
culture. The Normal University farm of ninety-five acres is 
used for demonstration and experiment in connection with the 
courses in agriculture. It is stockt with thorobred horses, swine, 
poultry, and a dairy herd. 

The manual training shops are supplied with lathes, jointe.". 
planer, band savv', circular saws, all driven by electric motors, 
and an abundant equipment of minor tools for wood and metal 
working. 



Illinois State Normal University 13 

The well-shaded campus of fifty-six acres contains over one 
hundred species of trees and shrubs. Its open spaces afford 
abundant room for tennis and other athletic sports. 

There is a valuable reference and circulating library of 
30,000 bound volumes and 24,000 pamflets. The books have been 
carefully selected and indext and now constitute a fairly com- 
plete working library in every department. 

The library is open eleven hours of every school day and four 
hours on Saturdays and during vacations. The librarian givs in- 
struction in the use of the library in a set of ten practical lessons. 
It is the aim of the teachers and librarian to help students to the 
use of books, and to give them the best assistance in doing their 
reference work. 

The library is supplied with the leading American periodicals. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

There ar seven literary societies connected with the school 
—the Philadelphian, the Wrightonian, the Ciceronian, the Girls' 
Debating Club and three junior societies in the University High 
School. These afford practis in oratory, debate, dramati-s, and 
parliamentary usage. The societies have well-furnisht rooms set 
aside for their use. 

CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATIONS 

New students rcceiv a harty welcome to the Young Men's 
and Young \Vomen"s Christian Associations of the Normal School. 
These organizations ar vigorous and activ, and endevor to pro- 
mote the social and spiritual welfare of th(^ students. 

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 

The purpose of this association is the cultivation of oratory, 
declamation and debate. The winners of the annual contest in 
oratory and declamation receiv the Richard Edwards medals, 
establisht in honor of the second president of the institution. 
The successful contestant in oratory represents this institution 
in the contest held in March of each year under the direction 
of the State Leag of Normal Schools. This association conducts 
also annual debates with the State Normal schools at Oshkosh 
and Terre Haute. 

THE ATHLETIC ASSOGL\TION 

This organization has general control of students' athletics 
in conjunction with the director of the gymnasium. 



t Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

THE LECTURE ASSOCIATION 

Three members of the faculty, four students, the pastors of 
le various churches in Normal and the city superintendent of 
;hools constitute a lecture board, to provide a course of high- 
ass lectures and concerts at low cost. The activ management 
' the course is in the hands of the student members. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The University Choral Club. — This organization meets twice 
ich week at 6:15. The club gives three concerts each year, sing- 
ig selections from standard operas, oratorios, and cantatas. 

Glee Clubs. — Four ar organized, two for men, two for women. 

The Orchestra. — It is the purpose of this organization to 
ve students who play upon an instrument an opportunity for 
"actis in concerted playing. Rehersals ar held regularly and such 
usic as is suitable for the social functions of the school is pre- 
ired. 

The Band. — The Normal University Band numbers about 
venty-five members. Daily instruction is given by the teachers 
' music upon the band and orchestral instruments. 

The music organizations ar under the direction of the teach- 
's of music. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 

The Dramatic Club (The Jesters^ was founded in 1909. 

s players ar drawn from the entire student body, and the casting 

characters is determind by the Directors from work done in 

ass, on special programs, and from numbers given at the Literary 

)cieties. 

The Science Club holds bi-weekly meetings, at which pa- 
irs ar red dealing with scientific questions. 

The Nature Study Club discusses ways and means of Bi- 
nding and popularizing the nature-study movement. 

The Country Life Club devotes its weekly meetings to the 
•nsideration of topics relating to the improvement of country 
fe thru the leadership or co-operation of the country school. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Vidette is a 16-page weekly, fild with local news, alumni 

)tes and practical and interesting matter on school topics con- 

ibuted by faculty and students. It is under the management 

the Vidette Board, elected by the students of the various 

asses. 

The Index, publisht annually by the senior class, contains 
staild information in regard to the various student organizations. 

The Alumni Quarterly is a 32-page magazine intended to 
)ep alumni in touch with the life of the institution. 



Illinois State Normal University 15 

ORGANIZATION 

The Illinois State Normal University comprizes four schools: 

The Normal School, 

The Teachers College, 

The Elementary Training School, 

The University High School. 
The Normal School is intended to prepare teachers for graded 
elementary schools, rural schools, and village schools. It provides 
for high-school graduates curriculums two years m length for pri- 
mary teachers, for upper-grade teachers, and for special teachers 
of art, manual training, household science, household art, agricul- 
ture commercial branches, public school music, and the kinder- 
garten. One-year and two-year curriculums ar provided to pre- 
pare country-school teachers, and a preparatory program for 
mature students who wish to make up deficiencies m high-school 

work. ^. , u u^ 

The Teachers College is intended to prepare high-schooJ 
teachers, supervizors, principals, and superintendents whose 
duties require a more extended preparation than the normal- 
school course. It provides full four-year curriculums beyond the 
high school, leading to the professional degree. Bachelor of Edu- 
cation. N 

The Elementary Training School consists of a kindergarten 
and eight grades. It is intended to serv as a model school for 
observation and training for students of the Normal School and 
Teachers College. The school of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home with 
435 pupils affords further facilities for training. 

The University High School is provided primarily for hold- 
ers of township scholarships who ar too young to enter the 
Normal School, or who do not intend to prepare for teachmg. 
Additional students are admitted on payment of tuition. It is a 
school of observation and training for students in the Teachers 
College. The attendance is limited to 230. 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO THE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Students ar admitted to the Normal School upon presentation 
of the following evidences of scholarship : 

1. A high-school diploma. 

2. A teacher's certificate. 

3. A certificate of attendance at another state normal school. 

4. A township scholarship under the Lindly Act. Tliis act 
provides for an annual examination in each township adapted to 
graduates of the eighth grade. Successful candidates ar awarded 
scholarships good for four years at any state normal school in 

Illinois. 

5. A county diploma or certificate of graduation from the 

eighth grade. . 

6. A statement from proper school authorities showmg thai 
one or more years of high-school work has been completed. 



16 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

All students who hav done any high-school work should bring 
a copy of their record signed by the principal. 

Persons not provided with the foregoing credentials may ar- 
range for admission by correspondency with the president. 

Young men to enter the normal school must be at least seven- 
teen years of age; young women sixteen. Students not of the 
required age ar assignd to the grammar school or high school 
until they reach the maturity desired. 

To obtain free tuition, students who ar not holders of town- 
ship scholarships ar required to sign a declaration of their inten- 
tion to devote tliemselvs to teaching in the public schools of 
Illinois for as long a period as they attend the Normal School. 

Students may enter at any time, provided they ar compe- 
tent to take up the work then in progress. It is best to enter 
at the beginning of a term. In all but the special programs classes 
ar pi'ovided each term for students beginning the course of study. 

CREDIT FOR WORK IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

For all work dorte in other state normal schools and in the 
University of Illinois, credit is given so far as such work is 
equivalent to our own courses. Credit for work done in other 
higher institutions is granted upon adequate proof that such work 
is a satisfactory substitute lor courses ofTerd here. No student is 
expected to mark time by repeating work well done elsewhere. 
SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Teachers of maturity and experience may be admitted as 
special students, and ar permitted to take up any work for which 
they ar prepared. They may not, however, be permitted to teach 
in the training school until they have had preliminary courses in 
general pedagogy. 

ENROLMEP^r 

The first day of each term, except the summer terms, is de- 
voted to the enrolment of new students, to the examination of 
students for advanst standing, or to complete the w^ork of the 
preceding term. New students should be present in the morning 
to present their credentials, to register in the offis, to pay their 
term fees, to consult with the appropriate committee in regard to 
their program of studies, to enrol with the director of the g>^m- 
nasium, and to consult with teachers in regard to their studies, 
so far as may be desirable. Students may enrol on the Saturday 
preceding the beginning of the term. 

Students arriving in Normal on the first day of the term or 
the preceding Saturday will be met at the railroad station or 
street car by students wearing red badges, w^ho will assist the new 
comers in finding suitable boarding places. 

Students arriving at other times ar advized to come directly 
to the ofTis of the president. 



Illinois State Normal University 17 

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS. 
Graduates of high schools with four-year courses recognized 
by the State Department of Education ar admitted to the Teachers 
College, or to any of the two-year programs ('A to J) ^^ the Normal 
School provided that the fifteen units of entrance credit that they 
offer include the following: 

Algebra • \ ^^^^ 

Geometry 

Physics \^ ^^^ 

^Chemistry 'f^ ^^! 

Zoology I- ^^^ 

Botany ^^ ^^^. 

Physiografy ^^ ^^'^ 

Civil Government /^ unit 

History (General, Ancient, Medieval, English 

or American) ^^/^ ^^i^^ 

Literature and English Composition • ^ ^^^^^ 

Total 10 ^^^^^ 

The remaining five units may be composed of any subjects that 
the high school accepts to meet its graduating requirements. 

The work above stated is the minimum in each branch. It is 
expected that each student shall have done more work m somi' 
of the subjects. ♦ ^ v. 

Graduates of recognized high schools who hav not com- 
pleted all the work listed above may take two of the omitted hall 
units in the regular classes in these subjects (see Program 1 . 
p 42) as substitutes for two stard subjects in then- i-ouu.ai- 
program. If the student is deficient in more than two half-units 
of the list, he shall add these subjects to the requirements of his 

regular program. -.u r ^^ ^^„n 

Graduates of non-accredited high schools with full four- 
year courses ar admitted on the same terms, and may continue 
in the program chosen, provided that they maintain in then- 
various studies a general average of not less than seventy- ive 
per cent. If they fall below this average in any term, they shal 
in the next term take such additional courses as may be arranged 
with the Dean. ^^ , ^^ . ., 

If high-school graduates admitted to the Normal Universi y 
are not able to write well with ease and speed, or read distinctly 
with good expression, extra courses in reading and penmanship 
must be taken by them soon after entering. 

A unit^is the amount of work done in a preparatory subject in 180 recitation period.^ 
of forty minutes each, or the equivalent in laboratory or other pract.s 

*Chenustry is not required lor adnussion to any of the speoal curr.cuhuus C- J 
(pages 25-33.) 



18 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADVANST STANDING 

To students pursuing any of the programs outlined on pages 
23-42 an opportunity is given to pass by examination any study 
in the program without taking the same in class. The regular 
time for such examination is the first Monday of each term. If 
this date is not convenient, arrangement for a suitable date may 
be made with the instructor. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free to all qualified students of the required age 
who ar preparing to teach in the schools of Illinois. A registra- 
tion fee of two dollars per term is charged all students except 
those holding township scholarships under the provision of the 
Lindly act. For each summer term of six weeks the fee is one 
dollar. Students from other states than Illinois and students 
not preparing to teach ar charged an additional tuition fee of 
ten dollars per term for the long terms. If within five years 
such student from another state teaches an equivalent time in 
Illinois, the tuition is refunded. An incidental fee of $1.25 per 
term is charged to maintain certain student organizations. 

Good furnisht rooms, large enuf for two persons, rent at from 
$2.00 to $3.00 per week. Table board in private families may be 
had at $3.50 per week. Good rooms and excellent boarding places 
ar abundant. Arrangements can be made better after arriving in 
Normal than by letter. 

Students not living at home are required to room at approved 
houses. A list of approved rooming houses is kept at the offis of 
the Dean of Women. A written contract is required strictly de- 
fining the terms on which rooms ar rented. 

Text books may be bought at the University at wholesale 
cost, or an outfit may be rented for one dollar per term. Students 
ar advized to own and keep the text books in advanst courses. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

To assist worthy students in completing their course of study 
the Alumni and Faculty hav created a Students' Loan Fund, 
from which students in their senior year may borrow at a low 
rate of interest a sum not to excede one hundred fifty dollars. 

Provision is made upon the Normal University farm for 
housing and boarding a small group of students of agriculture. 
These will be afforded regular employment a few hours each day 
at good wages. Application may be made by mail. 

Many students secure employment which enables them to 
meet their expenses. For such employment address Mr. E. W. 
Gavins or Miss Lillian Barton. Students should consult them be- 
fore entering into any agreement with an employer. 



Illinois State Normal University 19 

TEACHERS' BUREAU 

Thoroly traind teachers ar in demand in all the best schools 
H Illinois. Many boards of education will employ no others 

here is a rapidly increasing demand upon the normal schools 
■or such teachers. To meet this demand more effectivly the Illi- 
nois State Normal University maintains a teachers bureau whose 

urposes ar to secure for its students, free of cost, sui able posi- 
iJns and to aid school officers in selecting efficient teachers 
Snts, as a rule, do not expect employment without a personal 
Vm, it is hoped that the expense of such visit may be avoided 
unless there is some prospect of employment. 

GRADUATION 

Candidates for graduation shall, at the beginning of the year 
in September, file with the President the program of studies they 
desire to follow during the senior year. This program must ac- 
cord with the general daily programs for the various terms and 
the rules stated on pages 43, 44. If the student f^'-^e^ /o make 
substitutions not provided for by the genera rules, his request 
must be approved by the proper committee of the faculty. 

Candidates for graduation may enrol m the senior class at 
the beginning of the winter terra provided they lack of graduation 
fewer than twelv credits. 

NO person may recelv the diploma of this institution unless 
he has completed a full year (12 credits) of resident work All 
candidates for graduation shall write an acceptable thesis upon 
some educational theme. The subject shall "e reported to the 
hed of the proper department at the opening of the tall teim. 
The thesis shall be completed and handed in at the beginning of 

**"* SuXnts^'who lack no more than two credits of completing 
the course of study may participate in the Commencement func- 
tions in June and receiv their diplomas upon the completion of 
their work in the ensuing summer term. 

Candidates for graduation should see that al conditions and 
deficiencies ar removed by the end of the eighth week of the 
Spring term. 

ADVANST STANDING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. 
Graduates of tl.is institution ar regularly admitted to junior 
standing in the University of Illinois. Students who wish to 
prepare for teaching in such city high schools as require un>vers'ty 
graduation of their teachers, if alredy qualified to enter the fresh- 
man class at the university, may profitably spend the first two 
years in the careful professional training that the Normal School 
affords. 



20 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

The Normal School provides two summer terms of six weeks 
each for activ teachers and for students who wish to continue 
their studies during the summer. The programs consist chiefly 
of the regular courses in the various subjects. The daily pro- 
gram is so arranged that the student recites twice per day in the 
same subject, thus completing a regular twelv-week course in six 
weeks. All grades of the training school ar in session, affording 
model lessons for observation and discussion and opportunity for 
practis teaching. Especial prominence is given to music, drawing, 
construction work, modeling, manual training, and the household 
arts, to the natural sciences, to the common branches as outlined 
in the Illinois State Course of Study, and to the special courses 
required in the examination for state teachers' certificates. Credit 
is given for all satisfactory work and recorded on the book of the 
institution. A special summer-school announcement is issued in 
March. 

The large attendance of the summer school (2076 in the 
summer of 1915) makes it possible to provide excursions, con- 
certs, lectures and other forms of instruction and entertainment 
scarcely possible at institutions of limited attendance or less 
fortunately adapted to summer study. 

A similar mid-spring term will begin April 30, 1917. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The Normal School requires for its courses a good degree of 
maturity and scholarship, quite as much as that attaind by grad- 
uates of our best high schools with four-year courses. Accord- 
ingly the standard two-year curriculums of the Normal School ar 
pland for students of such preparation. Besides the standard 
curriculums others ar regularly taught to supply the needs of 
that large body of students whose preparation is not up to the 
standard named above. In the standard curriculum twenty-six 
credits ar required for graduation. By a ''credit" is ment the 
amount of work done in a given subject requiring daily preparation 
in a term of twelv weeks by a typical student carrying four studies 
and reciting five times per week in each. To complete the required 
curriculum the attendance required of the typical student is six 
regular terms of twelv weeks and one summer term of six weeks. 

The regular curriculums of study ar: 

A. A two-year curriculum (26 credits) to prepare teachers of 
upper grades. 

B. A two-year curriculum for teachers of lower grades. 

C. A two-year kindergarten-primary curriculum for teachers 
of the kindergarten and of the first two primary grades. 



Illinois State Normal University 2^ 

n T Two-vear curriculums to prepare special teachers of 
MusS ManurT^atnin,, Art and Design, Household Art, Domestic 
^i-ipnce Agriculture, and Commercial branches. 
Science, Agr^«^_y^^; Te^<,hevs College curriculum to prepare high- 
school' teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents 

: „.rr,::,':= r.r;t:r- 'i=": r;=™-;.r 

lums without condition. equivalent of four years of 

Mature students whose preparation falls ^'^^^ /^ '^.^^^ •„ curriculums may 

the regular credits of the curriculum selected. l,„j fho 

L A three-year curriculum for students who hav had he 
equivalent o' three years of high-school work. This leads to the 

--rTreTe'/rrrcuir r XdeVr tho hav comph^ 
the tenth grade'and wish to engage in teaching country schools 

''%' Ts?mnatlwo-year curriculum for graduates of the eighth 

^'^'^'s.ude.ru Who conrplete M or N ar recomtnended for third-.rade teacher.^ certi«- 
cates under the new certificating law. 

O A three-year curriculum to follow M for studen s who 
expeci to securVthe regular normal-school diploma^ Studen 
who hav completed N may continue with curnculum 0, but must 
Take before graduating, enuf additional work from program P o 
make a totaf of fifteen units of entrance credit and twenty-six 
term-credits of normal-school work. 

work to be taken from program P. •„ l^n<r»h tft 

P. A preparatory program, three years o'". '^^^ '° Jj/^jf/ '** 
enable mature students to supply the deficiencies in their h.gh- 

•"'"HX:rr"l"first-grade teachers' certificates originally granted 
before July \ 1914, with partial high-school preparation, may 

^rcu^cui;^^^^^^^^ 

tional courses in English, History, oi ui,.i>.i 

to the deficiency of their high-school preparation. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certil.cates who hav taught 
two years may enter upon program L on the same terms. 

luZ hofders of second-grade certiflates and holders o third- 
grade certificates who hav taught one year may be admitted to 

section M or section P. • , „ ,i,„v ar niirsuine 

Students ar designated by the curriculum they ar puisu.w 

nent as A\ A\ etc. 



22 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

It is the duty of the Illinois State Normal University to 
prepare every kind of teacher required for the public schools of 
Illinois. 

The needs of the schools ar set forth in the new law of 
1913, governing Teachers' Certificates. These certificates may 
be issued to candidates who hav past the examinations prescribed 
by the State Examining Board, or to those who hav done a re- 
quired amount of work in "recognized" normal schools or other 
higher institutions. 

Accordingly the State Normal University provides the spe- 
cific programs required for the various kinds of certificates. 

Graduates from curriculums A to L and from curriculum ar 
entitled to receiv a first-grade county elementary certificate good 
for three years and renewable indefinitly. 

Students who hav completed the work of the junior year in 
any of these curriculums may receiv the second-grade county ele- 
mentary certificate. 

Students completing M or N may receiv a third-grade county 
elementary certificate. 

The six-week courses required for renewal of these certifi- 
cates are offerd in the mid-spring term and the two summer 
terms. 

The Kindergarten Primary certificate, good for two years 
and renewable indefinitly, may be obtaind by completing curric- 
ulum G. 

Special certificates, good for two years and renewable indefi- 
nitly, may be obtaind after completing curriculums D to J in Music 
Art, Manual Training, Domestic Science, Domestic Art, Agricul- 
ture and Commercial branches. 

County high-school certificates, good for three years and 
renewable indefinitly, may be obtaind after completing three or 
more years of the Teachers College program. 

County Supervizors' certificates may be obtaind only hj 
examination in English, educational psychology, the history of 
education, and school administration. The Normal University 
offers extended and thoro courses in these subjects. 

State Elementary certificates and State High-School certifi- 
cates are issued to teachers of due preparation and long experi- 
ence m teaching who pass an examination in English, educational 
psychology, and principles and methods of teaching. The State 
Normal University offers adequate courses in these subjects in 
both the regular and summer terms. 

For the State Supervizors' certificate is required graduation 
from a normal school and an examination in English, educational 
psychology, sociology, the history of education, and school man- 
agement, administration, and supervizion. 



Illinois State Normal University 



23 



CURRICULUM A 

For Teachers of Upper Grades 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
Teaching Process 
Arithmetic 2 
Grammar 1 
Drawing 1 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Physiology 9 
Geografy 4, 5, or 6 
Reading 4, 7, or 11 
* Music 2 or 3 
Physical Training 



Spring 
Psychology 2 
Nature Study 7 
Geografy 2 
Reading Method 

* Bookbinding or 

* Bench Work 
Physical Training 



Summer Term 

General Method 
Any electiv study 

SECOND YEAR 

School Manag-ment Economics 2 Prm. of Education 

Science of I^scourse ^History 4, or ^^^^.^tvlo of 

•Political Science or ^Physical Science, or Biology 10 or 

Color and Design ^Industrial Art ^Applied Design 

Teaching Teaching Teaching 

Spelling and writing ar required the second term of all stu- 
dents found deficient in these branches. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 43 may be 
taken insted of the stard courses. 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM B 

For Teachers of Lower Grades 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
Teaching Process 
*Reading 4 
Physiology 9 
Music 2 or 3 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Psychology 2 
Arithmetic 1 
(Reading Method 
(Geografy 2 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Method in Language 
"Science of Discourse 



Spring 
General Method 
Advanst Nature 

Study 7 
Primary Geografy 
Primary Music 
Physical Training 



SECOND YEAR 

Prin. of Education School Management, 
*Grammar 1, or or Kindergarten 

* Physical Science, or Economics 2 or 
•Industrial Art Sociology 

Teaching "Playground Manage- 

ment 
Teaching 

Spelling and writing ar required of all students found defi- 
cient in these branches. These must be taken the second term 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 43 may b^ 
taken msted of the stard courses. "^ 



Literature Method 
•History Method 7 
Primary Handwork 
Color 
Teaching 



Illinois State Normal University 



25 



CURRICULUM C 

Kindergarten-Primary Program 

For Teachers of the Kindergarten and the 
First Two Grades of the Elementary School 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
Kindergarten Theory 
Kindergarten Tech- 
nics 
Kindergarten Practis 
Nature Study 7 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Kindergarten Theory Kindergarten Tech- 
Kindergarten Tech- nics 

nics Primary Handwork or 

Primary Handwork orKindergarten Prnctis 
Kindergarten Practis Psychology 
Physiology 9 Primary Music 

Music 2 Color 

Physical Training Physical Tramuig 



Summer Term 

General Method 
Arithmetic Method 



SENIOR YEAR 



Prin. of Education 
* Primary Geografy 
•Playground Manage- 
ment 
Teaching 



Educ. Psychology Sociology 
Kindergarten Theory Kindergarten Theory 
Kindergarten Practis Reading Method 
Literature Method Geografy 2 
Teaching 

This program is pland for high-school graduates and U) meet 
the requirements of the new law for the certificating of teachers 

Elcotivs chosen according to the rules on page 43 may be 
taken insted of the stard courses. 

Students taking this curriculum should be able to smg and 
play simple music. 

Students ar advized not to begin this course unless they ex- 
pect to attend two consecutiv years. 



26 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM D 

Special Curriculum in Music 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 

Musio 2 

Teaching Process 
Reading 2 
*Literature 5 
Physical Training 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Music 4 Music 3 

Physiology 9 Psychology 2 
'Science of Discourse Sociology 

Reading Method * Public Speaking 

Sound Physical Training 
Physical Training 






Summer Term 

Reading 3 
General Method 



SENIOR YEAR 

Music 5 Music 6 

'Literature 6 *Prin. of Education 

*The Speaking Voice 'Economics 



Teaching 



Teaching 



Music 7 

'School Management 

'Literature 9 

Teaching 



Students who ar taking approved courses in instrumental 
music parallel to this program may arrange with the Dean to 
substitute the same for the stard courses above. 

Other electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 43. 



Illinois State Normal University 



27 



CURRICULUM E 

Special Manual Training Curriculum 
78 Weeks— 27 y2 Credits 



FIRST YEAR 

Fall Winter 

Bench Work Bench Work 

Drawing 1 Mechanical Drawing 

Design Teaching Process 
Science of Discourse Geometry 2 or 1 

Economics 2 Gymnastics 
Physical Training 



Spring 
Lathe Work 
Mechanical Drawing 
Psychology 2 
Elementary Wood- 
work and Carpentry 
Physical Training 



Summer Term 

Pottery 
Bookbinding 
General Method 



Organization of 

Manual Training 
Teaching 
Machine Drawing 
Art Metal 



SECOND YEAR 

Factory Method Fur- 'Industrial History 
niture Construction Architectural Draw. 
Teaching Teaching 

School Management * Furniture Designing 
Primary Handwork and Construction 
•History of Manual 'Principles of Educa- 
Training (% credit) tion 



Furniture Designing and Construction may be taken as a 
major or minor. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 43 may be 
substituted for the stard courses. 



28 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM F 

Special Curriculum in Art and Design 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
Perspectiv 5 
Color Theory 
Prim. Handwork 
Prin. of Design 
Teaching Process 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Light and Shade 6 
Art Appreciation 
Economics 2, or 
Physiology 9 
Mechanical Drawing 
Physical Training 



Spring 
Color Practis 
Thin Wood 4 
Psychology 
Applied Design 
Physical Training 



Summer Term 



Nature Study 
General Method 



SECOND YEAR 

Art Metal Pottery 

Costume Design Industrial Art 

Home Decoration Teaching 

Prin. of Education Cast Drawing 
Teaching 

Students pursuing this program who ar found to be deficient 
in penmanship, spelling, English composition, or oral expression ar 
required to take special courses in these subjects during the 
winter term. 



Bookbinding 
Art Organization 
Painting 
Teaching 



Illinois State Normal University 



CURRICULUM D-F 

Special Curriculum in Music and Art 
116 Weeks— 38 Credits 



29 



Fall 
'Perspectiv 
Color Theory 
Music 2 

Prin. of Design 
Physical Training 
Teaching Process 



Art Metal 
Music 5 
Reading 2 
Teaching Drawing 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Music 3 
Music 4 

Light and Shade 
Art Appreciation 
Economics 2, or 
Physiology 9 
Primary Handwork 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Nature Study 
General Method 

SECOND YEAR 

Music 6 
Cast Drawing 
Pottery 

* Science of Dis- 
course 

THIRD YEAR 



Spring 
Color Practis 
Thin Wood 
Psychology 
Applied Design 
Physical Training 



Costume Design and Industrial Art 
Home Decoration Sociology, or 
•Literature 6 * Reading 3 

*The Speaking Voice Sound 

Reading Method 
Teaching 



Music 7 

Bookbinding 

Painting 

Prin. of Education 



Mechanical Drawing 
Teaching Music 
•Literature 9 
Art Organization 



30 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM G 

Special Curkiculum in Household Art 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 
FIRST YEAR 

l^ALL \Vinti:r Spring 

Household Art 1 Household Art 2 Household Art 3 

Teaching Process Psycholog>- 2 General Method 

Science of Discourse Commercial Geografy Economics 2 
Principles of Design Drawing 1 or Sociology 

Gymnastics 1 Gymnastics 2 Color 

Gymnastics 3 

Summer Term 

Physiolog>^ 9 

'Floriculture and Landscape Gardening 



Fall 
Household Art 4 
Prin. of Education 

or Teaching 
Costume Design 
Home Decoration 
Textils 



SECOND YEAR 

Winter 
Household Art 5 
School Management 

or Teaching 
*Electiv 
•Electiv 



Spring 
Household Art 6 
History of Education 

or Teaching 
Industrial History 
Applied Design 



Fall 

Household Science 1 
Chemistry 1 
Teaching Process 
•Commercial Geog- 

rafy 6 
Physical Training 



Illinois State Normal University 



?>\ 



CURRICULUM H 

Special Curriculum in Household Science 
78 Weeks— 27 y2 Credits 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Household Science 2 
Chemistry 2 
Psychology 



Spring 
Household Science 
Chemistry 3 
General Method 
Science of Discourse Sociology 
Physical Training Physical Training 



Household Science ^ 
Chemistry 4 
Bacteriology 21 
Principles of Educa- 
tion, or Teaching 



Summer Term 

Economics 2 
School Management 

SECOND YEAR 

Household Science 
Chemistry 8 
Physiology 22 
Teaching 



Household Science 6 
History of Educ, or 
•Sanitation 23 
•Vegetable Gardening 
Teaching 



\ 



32 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM G-H 

Three-Year Curriculum in Home Economics 

Household Art and Household Science 

116 Weeks~38 Credits 



\ 



Fall 
Household Art 1 
Principles of Desigii 
Science of Discourse 
Teaching Process 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Household Art 2 Household Art 3 

Drawing Color 
Commercial Geografy Sociology 

Psychology 2 General Method 

Physical Training Physical Training 



Summer Term 

Chemistry 1 
'Floriculture 

SECOND YEAR 

Household Science 1 Household Science 2 Household Science 3 
Household Art 4 Household Art 5 Household Art 6 

School Management 

Chemistry 2 



Costume Design 
Home Decoration 
Textils 
or Teaching 



'Economics 2 or 

Teaching 
Chemistry 3 



THIRD YEAR 



Household Science 4 Household Science 5 Household Science 6 
Chemistry 4 Chemistry G 'Vegetable Gardening 

Bacteriology' 21 Physiology 22 'Sanitation 23 

Teaching, or Prin. of JMucation Teaching 

*Electiv or Teaching or Electiv 

Substitutions for the stard courses may be made with the ap- 
proval of the president or dean. 



Illinois State Normal University 

CURRICULUM I 

Four-Year Curriculum in Agriculture 



33 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Animal Husbandry 1 Animal Husbandry 



Fall 



Chemistry 2 
Zool. 4 or Bot. 16 



Chemistry 1 

Zoology 3 or Bot. 6 

Science of Discourse Teaching Process 

Physical Training Physical Training 



Spring 
Horticulture 1 
Chemistry 3 
Psychology 2 
Economics 
Physical Training 



Agronomy 1 
•Chemistry 5 
School Management 
'Teaching 
'Physics 4 



Agronomy 4 
'Chemistry 4 
Physics 7 
Botany 18 



Summer Term 
Botany 5 
General Method 

SECOND YEAR 

Agronomy 2 Agronomy 3 

'Chemistry 6 'Chemistry 7 

Commercial Geografy Principles of Educ, 
'Teaching 'Teaching 

'Physics 5 'Mechanics 



THIRD YEAR 

Agronomy 5 
'Chemistry 8 
Physics 8 
Botany 18 and 19 

FOURTH YEAR 



Dairy Husbandry 1 
Horticulture 2 
Physics 9 
Botany 19 



Animal Husbandry 4 
'Animal Husbandry 5 
Zoology 14 
'Teaching 



Agronomy 6 Agronomy 7 

'Animal Husbandry 3 'Agronomy 8 
Zoology 12 Zoology 13 

'Teaching 'Teaching 

Courses in Literature, History, and Civil Government ar 
recommended as electiv substitutes. 

Three terms of Practis Teaching ar required. 

The normal-school diploma will be given at the end of the 
first two years; the teachers' college diploma at the end of the 
fourth year. 



34 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

CURRICULUM J 

Commercial Course for Teachers 
78 Weeks— 26 y2 Credits 



Fall 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 
Psychology 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Business Corre- 
spondence 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

General Method 
Commercial Geografy 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
H. S. Problems 
Physical Training 






Fall Winter 

Shorthand Shorthand 

Typewriting Typewriting 

History of Commerce Commercial Arith- 
Commercial Law 1 metic 

Practis Teaching Commercial Law 2 

Practis Teaching 
Note: Offis Methods and Appliances 
second year of Typewriting. 

List of Credits 



Spring 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Economics 
Salesmanship and 

Advertizing 
Practis Teaching 
will be included in the 



Business Correspondence . . 'V2 

Accounting 3 

Shorthand 6 

Typewriting 3 

Commercial Law iy^ 

Commercial Geografy 1 

Psychology 1 

Pedagogy 1 

Practis Teaching 3 



History of Commerce % 

General Method l 

Commercial Arithmetic ... 1 

Salesmanship 1 

Penmanship 1^ 

Physical Education 1 % 

Economics l 

26% 



Students entering with high-school units in any of these 
commercial branches may modify this program under advize- 
ment. 



Illinois State Normal University 35 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The purpose of the Teachers College is to afford adequate 

professional preparation for high-school teachers, Principals 

uperintendents, and special teachers. Its programs Projide or 

two years' work in the Junior College, two years m the Senior 

'^""^ High-school graduates having the special preparation set 
forth on page 17 are admitted to the Junior College and a pro- 
gram of study four years in length. (50 credits.) 

Students in the Normal School may transfer to the Junior 
College if they hav completed fifteen units of work of secondary 

^^^"^Normal-School graduate's ar admitted to the Senior College 
and to a curriculum two years in length. (24 credits ) 

College graduates ar admitted to the Senior College and to a 
ispecial professional curriculum one year in length. (14 credits, 
eight of them in education and teaching.) 

All students completing the prescribed curriculum receiv the 
degree of Bachelor of Education. . ^ „ 

Students completing the curriculum of the Junior College may 
receiv the normal-school diploma, if their credits include five 
terms in education and two terms of teaching with a grade not 
lower than 80. , , ^ .. ^,^ 

The program of the Teachers College is largely electiv. The 
electiv courses fall into three lists, designated C, B, and A. 

First-year students may select from List C. 

Second-year students may select from List C or List B. 

Students in the Senior College must select two of their four 
courses from List A, the others may be chosen from List C or 
List B No course in List A may be taken unless its prerequisits 
in the Junior College hav been completed. College graduates 
may choose their electivs from any list, or from the normal-school 
programs approved by the president. Two of the three terms 
in practis teaching listed in the Senior College may be taken in 
the second year. One must be taken in the last year. 

Students in the Teachers College ar required to elect some 
major subject in which they ar to make at least nine credits 
The student is expected to take also such other courses related 
to his major as ar prescribed by the hed of the department m 
which the major lies. As a rule the electivs chosen should run 

thru the year. ^. ^ , xv « 

Students in the Teachers College ar subject to the same 
general requirements relating to platform speaking, physical 
training, attendance at general exercizes, and general decorum 
as apply to normal-school students. 

Students admitted to the Teachers College who ar found de- 
ficient in writing, spelling, composition or oral expression ar 
required to take a special course in such subject during the second 
term. 



^6 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

TEACHERS COLLEGE CURRICULUM, K 

150 Weeks — 50 Credits 

The required studies in pedagogy scheduled for the second 
year may be deferd until the third year. 

Two substitutes may be taken for stard courses to make up 
conditions. See page 17. 



Fall 
Elem. Psychology 
* Music, or 
Physiology 9 
Physical Training 
*Electiv G 
Electiv C 



Fall 
General Method 
*Reading 4 
Electiv B or C 
Electiv B or C 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Grammar 1 
Physiology, or 
Music 

Physical Training 
*Electiv G 
Electiv G 

Summer Term 

Economics 
Electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Winter 
School Management 
* Public Speaking 
Electiv B or C 
Electiv B or C 



Spring 

Teaching Process, or 
H. S. Problems 
* Drawing 1 
Fliysical Training 
*Electiv C 
Electiv C 






Spring 
Prin. of Education 
Science of Discourse 
Electiv B or G 
Electiv B or C 



School Administra- 
tion 
Educ. Psychology, 
or Hist, of Education 
Electiv A, B or C 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



Teaching 
Electiv A, 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



B or G 



THIRD YEAR 

School Administra- School Administra- 
tion tion 
Educational Psych, or Ethics, or 
History of Education History of Education 
Electiv A, B or G Electiv A, B or G 
Electiv A Electiv A 
Electiv A Electiv A 



FOURTH YEAR 



Teaching 
Electiv A, 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



B or C 



Teaching 
Electiv A, 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



B or C 



Illinois State Normal University 

ELECTIV COURSES IN THE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE 



37 



List C — Junior College 



Fall 
Arithmetic 1 or 2 
Physics 4 
Chemistry 1 
Zoology 3 
Geografy 3 
Political Science 
Literature 5 
Latin Method 
German 1 

Domestic Science 1 
Domestic Art 
Mechanical Drawing 
Drawing 4 and 7 



Winter 
Geometry 1 or 2 
Physics 5 
Chemistry 2 
Zoology 4 
Geografy 4 
Political Parties 



Spring 

Algebra 
Mechanics 
Chemistry 3 ' 
Botany 5 
Geografy 7 or 6 
Municipal Problems 



Literature Method 4 Hist, of Eng. Language 
Latin-Eng. EtymologyCsesar-Cicero Method 
German 2 German 3 

Domestic Science 2 Domestic Science 3 
Domestic Art Domestic Art 

Mechanical Drawing Bench Work 
Drawing 5 and 6 Drawing 8 



List B — Junior College 



College Algebra 
Chemistry 4 
Botany 6 
Geografy 11 
History 11 
•Sociology 
Literature 6 
Latin 10 
German 4 

The Speaking Voice 
Domestic Art 
Domestic Science 
Machine Drawing? 
Design 



Trigonometry 
Chemistry 6 
Biology Method 
Geografy 12 
Histo] Method 
*Economics 4 
Hist, of Eng. Liter. 
* Latin 11 
German 5 
Dramatic Reading 
Domestic Art 
Domestic Science 
Furniture 
Industrial Art 
Art Appreciation 



Analytics 

Taxonomic Biology 
Geografy 13 
History 5 

'Amer. Indus. Hist. 
8 Literature 9 
* Latin 12 
German 6 

Adv. Public Speaking 
Domestic Art 
Domestic Sci^ncd 
Architectural Draw. 
Applied Design 
Painting 

List A — Senior College 

T St of Educ~.Mon 8 Hist, of Education 9 Hist, of Education 10 

Educational Psychol. Educational Psychol. Ethics 

School Administra. School Administra. School Administration 

Physics 9 

Chemistry 6 

* General Zoology 12 
Advanst Physiology 
fOrganic Evohiiion 
Plant Physiology 

* Plant Pathology 
Nature Study 22 

* Climatology 
[Economics 3 

* History 14 
"History 17 

* English Drama 14 
tBrowning 14 
tTacitus 

„„ . German 8 

Taught 1917-18 and in alternate years thereafter. 
tTaught 1916-17 and in alternate years thereafter, 



Physics 

Chemistry 5 

*General Zoology 12 

Bacteriology 

fEntomology 

t Plant Morfology 

* Plant Pathology 
Nature Study 21 

* Geology 
tSocial Problems 
History 13 
tHistory 16 
•American Poetrv 10 
tEngl-sh Poetry 13 
Latin Coinnosition 
German 7 



Physics 10 
Chemistry 7 

* General Zoology 12 
Sanitation 

tEoonomic Entomol. 
tPlant Ecology 

* Bacteriology 
Nature Study 23 
*Cons. Nat. Resources 
tEng. Indus. Hist. 
'History 15 
tHistory 18 
*The Novel 12 
tl9th Century Prose 
tDe Senectute 
German 9 



38 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



Fall 
Arithmetic 2 
Grammar 2 
Geografy 1 or 3 
* Reading 2 
Physical Training 



CURRICULUM L 

The Three-Year Curriculum 

114 Weeks— 38 y2 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Arithmetic 1 "Algebra 2 

"Grammar 3 (6 wks.) Science of Discourse 
* Geografy 2 (6 wks.) * Music 2 or 3 
Teaching Process "Drawing 1 

U. S. History 4 "Botany 5 or 10 

Physical Training Physical Training 
tSpelling or Writing 

Summer Term 



I 



"Algebra 3 
Psychology 2 
Zoology 3, or 
Botany 6 
Color 
•Design 



Economics 2 
Physics 2 or 4 
"Literature 2 
Teaching 



Orthografy 
Reading Method 
Any electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 1 
General Method 
"Reading 3, or 
"Zoology 4 
Civics 



THIRD YEAR 

Chemistry 1 
or Physics 5 
"Shakspere 
Teaching 



'Geometry 2 
Teaching 
"Public Speaking 
Physiology 9 
"Applied Design 



"Physics 3 
or Chemistry 1 
"Modern History 17 
Geografy 4, 5 or 6 



School Management Prin. of Education 



No student may omit both Literature 2 and Shakspere. 
tSpelling and writing ar to be taken only if student is de- 
ficient. 

Electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 43. 
If Latin or German is taken thruout the course, six majors 
may be omitted. 

This program is pland for teachers of upper grades. Teachers 
of lower grades should choose substitutes from programs B or G. 



Illinois State Normal University 

CURRICULUM M 

The One- Year Curriculum for Country Teachers 
For Graduates of the Tenth Grade 



39 



36 Weeks — 13 Credits 



Mensuration 
Geografy 10 
U. S. History 2 
Physical Training 

* Civics 12 

* Nature Study 1 

* Reading 1 

* Drawing 3 

* Music 2 

* Primary Handwork 



Country School 

Teaching 
Arithmetic 1 
Physiology 8 
Physical Training 
*U. S. History 3 
*Orthografy 

* Elementary Physics 

* Manual Training 
'Household Art 



Grammar 4 
Country School 

Problems 
Agricultural Nat. 

Study 

* Reading 1 

* Primary Handwork 

* Music 

* Reading Method 
•Literature Method 
Bench Work 



* Household Science 
Students should elect one stard subject (or pair) i^ addition 
to the required subjects at the top of the list. Other electivsm^^^ 
be taken insted of the required subjects if approved by the Deaa 
No S may be certified as having completed this year's work 
until the pupil has shown by examination or class-room work, 
proficiency in the branches required for a third-grade teachers 
certificate. 

CURRICULUM N 

Two-Year Curriculum for Country Teachers 
For Graduates of the Eighth Grade 



Nature Study 
Mensuration 
Composition 
Orthografy 
Physical Training 



Geografy 14 
Civics 12 
U. S. History 2 
Reading 1 



72 Weeks — 25 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 
Elementary Physics 
Percent, and Book- 
keeping 
Drawing 3 
Physical Training 
•Domestic Science 
•Manual Training 
SECOND YEAR 
Country School 
Organization 
Physiology 8 
U. S. History 3 
•Household Art 
•Manual Training 
•Agriculture 



Agri. Nature Study 
Geografy 9 
Country School 

Teaching 
Primary Handwork 
Physical Training 
Music 

Method in Reading 
and Literature 

Country School 
Problems 

Grammar 4 

Arithmetic 1 



40 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM O 

For students who hav completed ciirriculums M or N and 
desire the regular normal-school diploma. 

114 Weeks— 38 Credits 



Fall 
Grammar 5 
Algebra 4 
Zoology 3 
*Geografy 4 
Gymnastics 3 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Public Speaking 
Algebra 5 
Phyoiology 9 
'Zoology 4 
'Elementary Physics 



Spring 
Reading 2 
Algebra 6 
Botany 5 
Rhetoric 3 



Summer Term 
Any two electiv courses 



Anciint History 

Psychology 2 
G ometry 3 
*Botany 6 or 
'Debating 



SECOND YEAR 

Medieval History 
Literature 1 
General Method 
Geometry 4 



Modern History 
Reading 3 
'Geografy 5 or 6 
'Geometry 5 
'Drawing 7 and 8 



k 



THIRD YEAR 



Political Science 
Physics 2 or 4 
Literature 2 



Principles of Educa. 
Physics 3, or 
Chemistry 1 
Economics 2 
Teaching 



Shakspere 
Chemistry 1 

or Physics 5 
School Management 
Teaching Teaching 

Stard subjects ar electiv. It is expected that in the first year 
and in the summer term students from section M will arrange to 
take the electivs previously omitted from program M. One term 
of Geografy is required. 

Students from Section N ar required to take before graduation 
enuf additional courses from program P to make a total of fifteen 
units of entrance credit, and twenty-six normal-school credits. 

Students from Section M and N who wish to take up any of 
the special programs A-K should take from program P preparatory 
courses as arranged with the Dean. 



Illinois State Normal University ^♦t 

CURRICULUM P 

The Preparatory Curriculum 

The preparatory curriculum is intended for students old enuf 
) enter the normal school, who, because of their maturity and 
iligence, ar able to complete the equivalent of a high-school 
burse in less than four school years. 

It is not intended for students who expect to engage in 
baching after one or two years' attendance in the normal school, 
uch students should take curriculums M or N. 

It is recommended for mature students who wish to take 
le special curriculums A to K but lack the high-school prepara- 
on required. 

Experienst teachers who wish to begin at once upon any of 
le curriculums A to K may arrange with the President or Dean 
^ select part of their work from the preparatory program, part 
it from the special curriculum. 

Preparatory credit is reckond in units, a unit being the 
quivalent of 36 weeks of high-school work with daily recitations 
bquiring preparation. The numerals after the various term 
Durses indicate the fraction of a unit coverd by the term's work. 

Students of the required age who hav completed the eighth 
rade and hav had no high-school work must complete fifteen 
inits of preparatory work. Students who hav completed a par^ 
ial high-school course, may, in consultation with the President 
r Dean, select from the preparatory program the units to be taken 
complete the fifteen. 

The stard courses ar electiv. Each student is required to 
ake one stard subject each term in addition to the required 
ubjects at the top of the list. 

Public speaking is required daily for one term, weekly thru- 
ut the entire course. The total credit allowd is one unit. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certificates without high- 
chool work to their credit may shorten this program by passing: 
in examination in such subjects as they ar prepared to pass. 

Holders of second-grade certificates who hav taught two 
^ears ar allowd one-half unit of preparatory credit for each sub- 
ect coverd by the certificate, but no such credit may be allowd 
n subjects where high-school credit is presented. 

Holders of first-grade teachers' certificates may make similac 
irrangements for the completion of the preparatory program. 



42 Annual Catalog and Course of Stxidy 



PROGRAM P 

The Preparatory Program 



FIRST YEAR 



% 



Fall Winter Spring 

Algebra 4 VaAlgebra 5 VjAlgehva. 6 

Algebra 7 %Algebra 8 %Algebra 9 % 

Composition .. ."..VsPublic Speaking . . VsOrthografy ..... ..^ 

Reading 1 %Elem. Physics % Physical Geografy..y2 

Physical Training l-6Physical Training l-6Physical Training 1-6 

*Civics 1 y3*Economics 1 y^Reading 2 % 

•Manual Training.. Vs* Manual Training ..Vs* Manual Training . J4 
•Domestic Science-.Tj 'Domestic Science . Vs* Domestic Science .% 

•Latin 1 Vs-Latin 2 Yfl]^^^'"' ^ o ^ 

•German 1 Vs 'German 2 % German 3 % 

SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 3 y2Geometry 4 y2Geometry 5 Mi 

Grammar 4 VsRhetoric VaLiterature 1 % 

Zoology 3 VzPhysiology 8 V2 Botany 5 % 

•Amer Hist 2 y2*Amer. Hist. 3 ^English Hist % 

•Commer. Geog .. .¥2 "Zoology 4 Va^Music & Draw....^ 

•Sewing Vs-Sewing Vs Sewing % 

•Mechan Draw . . . Vs'Mechan. Draw ...%*Mechan. Draw . . . Va 

•Latin 4 y,-Latin 5 fKL^*-^^ ^ \ ^ 

•German 4 Vs 'German 5 % German 6 % 

THIRD YEAR 

Physics 2 y2 Chemistry 1 ^Physics 3 % 

Literature 2 VsReading 3 VoShakspere 3 ^ 

Ancient Hist y2 Medieval Hist y2Modern History . . . Va 

•Botany 6 y2*Astronomy y2 'Algebra 1 ^ 

Art 4 and 7 Vs'Art 5 and 6 y>.;Art 8 . Vs 

•Chemistry 1 ys'Chemistry 2 Va'Chemistry 3 % 

•Latin 7 i^'Latin 8 f^Latin 9 ^ 

'German 7 % 'German 8 y2 'German 9 H 

Design ^'Arithmetic 2 VaApplied Design ...^2 

Industrial Art V2 



Illinois State Normal University 43 

RULES RELATING TO STUDIES AND 
CONDUCT 

1. Every new student is expected at the beginning to choose 
one of the various curriculums and to follow this curriculum 
as closely as is practicable except where electiv substitutes ar 
specifically allowd, 

2. Variations from the regular program chosen ar per- 
mitted to special students, and to others if there be special need 
of such change. All individual programs involving substitutions 
must be approved by the President or the Dean, 

3. Students who hav become irregular in their programs 
or who contemplate taking electivs should study carefully the 
daily programs on pages 49-53. All irregular programs should 
be approved by one of the faculty committee on student pro- 
grams (page 9). .1. 

4. No substitution may be allowd for the common branches 
unless the student gives satisfactory evidence of proficiency in 
such branches. In doutful cases an examination may be required. 

5. No substitution for any of the natural sciences may be 
allowd unless the student's previous study in the omitted branch 
is equal to the requirements for admission as shown on page 17. 

6. Electivs may be chosen from any of the programs on 
pp. 23-42 provided the student is qualified to pursue the subject 
with profit This permission may be granted by the President 
or Dean. Electivs chosen from program P must be of half- 
unit value if substituted in programs A to L. 

7. The electivs allowd include five years' work in Latin, 
three years' work in German, and courses in method for students 
who hav alredy attaind considerable proficiency in these lan- 
guages. For the first year's work in Latin or German one credit 
is allowd, for the second year two credits, for all work beyond 
the second year and for the courses in method full credit. 

8. No electiv credit is allowd for a single term in cooking or 
sewing; for two terms one credit is given; for three terms three 
credits 

9.* No credit is allowd for less than one hundred twenty 
hours of bench work. >^ 

10. All classes recite daily in the regular terms. In the mid- 
spring and summer terms of six weeks two recitations per day ar 
held in most subjects, thus enabling the student to complete the 
regular twelv-week courses. 

11. Four hours per week of gymnasium practis is required of 
all first-year students. Students who cannot profitably take this 
work because of age or physical disability may substitute electivs. 
Ten library lessons ar given each term to entering students. 

12. Thirty minutes per day ar devoted at General Exercises 
to the consideration of topics of interest to prospectiv teachers. 



44 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



All members of the school ar expected to attend. One day per 
week the school at this hour is divided into small sections for 
practis in platform speaking. All students ar required to partici- 
pate in this work. 

13. Every student Is expected to take not more than four 
major subjects (or their equivalent), nor less than three, not 
counting physical training. Students whose standing in all sub- 
jects is above 80 may take a hevier program, with the approval of 
the Dean. A program of less than fifteen hours a week may be 
taken only by special permission. 

14. If a student fails to keep pace with his class In any study 
he may be transferd to a lower section in such study or be re- 
quired to drop the study. 

15. If a student fails to carry a study after continuing thru 
half the term he is required to repeat the study at the earliest op- 
portunity. 

16. If a student fails to complete a course in which his work 
is of good quality, he should complete such course in the next 
term in which he is in attendance and the course offerd. Other- 
wise the entire course is to be repeated at the earliest opportunity. 

17. A student who fails in any term to make a passing grade 
in two major studies, or their equivalent, is placed upon probation 
for the succeding term, and in case he fails to carry two majors 
in the succeding term, he shall not be permitted to continue his 
studies until one year has elapst. This rule may be suspended in 
the case of any student by a majority vote of the faculty. 

18. Other students may be placed upon probation by the 
faculty or by the Committee on Disciplin. Such probation shall 
not excede one term. Students on probation may not take part in 
any public contest or exhibition, athletic, musical, dramatic, or 
oratorical 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Term fees and tuition ar to be paid the first day of the term. 
If the student leaves school within two weeks (one week in sum- 
mer), fees ar refunded. If a student paying tuition leaves school 
during the first half of the term, half of the tuition is refunded. 

Students ar enrold in their classes upon presentation of their 
term-fee or tuition receipt, or evidence that they hold township 
scholarships. 

Grades for scholarship indicate as follows: Above 90, dis- 
tinguisht proficiency; 86-90, excellent; 81-85, good; 76-80, average; 
70-75, fair work below the average; below 70 indicates poor work 
and the student must repeat the course. The median is 80. 

Students ar expected, whenever it is possible, to enter school 
at the beginning of the term and remain to the close, to attend 
their classes regularly, and to conform to the various requirements 
that hav been found necessary to the orderly and successful work- 
ing of the institution and to the welfare of its students. 






Illinois State Normal University 45 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

The act of the State Legislature creating Township Scholar- 
ships in the state normal schools for the benefit of graduates of 
the eighth grade obliges these institutions to provide academic 
courses for such holders of these scholarships as do not intend to 
become teachers, and also for such as ar looking to teaching but 
ar still too young to enter upon the regular normal-school pro- 
grams. 

Tuition is free to all holders of township scholarships. 

Other students of suitable age, character, and preparation may 
be admitted upon payment of tuition at the rate of eighteen dollars 
per term, or six dollars per study where partial work is taken. 
Attendance is limited to 230. 

Students whose tuition is to be paid from public funds should 
secure the necessary permits early in the fall term. 

The high-school students ar seated in a separate study hall 
in charge of a principal and three teachers, who devote their entire 
time to the instruction and care of these high-school students anc^ 
to the supervision of their work. 

On pages 46-48 five programs of study ar outlined; one with 
Latin and German for such students as expect to enter college, 
another designd especially for girls, giving a large place to house- 
hold economy, a commercial program, a manual training program, 
an agricultural program. Physical training and music must be 
taken at some time during the first three years. Monthly rhetori- 
cal exercizes ar required of all students. 

It is the intention to develop this department into a model 
high-school. While the value of liberal culture and the demands 
of citizenship will receiv due recognition in the arrangement of its 
courses, it is proposed to meet the growing demand that the high- 
school course shall prove directly servisable in preparing for high 
efficiency in useful occupations. Accordingly there ar arranged 
five chief programs, each four years in length, differing in the 
prominence given to particular groups of studies, and looking re- 
spectivly toward the speaking and writing professions, medicin 
and agriculture, engineering and the bilding trades, commerce, and 
the household arts. 

Graduates of the University High School ar admitted without 
examination to all universities and colleges belonging to the North 
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Holders of township scholarships and others who contemplate 
entering the University High School ar requested to register as 
early as is possible. Registration may be by mail. 

A special bulletin describing the University High School will 
be furnisht upon application. 



46 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

LATIN-GERMAN CURRICULUM 



Latin 

Composition 1 
Algebra 
Physical Science 



Csesar 

Composition 2 
Greek History 
Zoology 



Cicero or German 
Literature 5 
Modern History 
Plane Geometry 



Vergil or German 
Literature 7 
Physics 

U. S. History or 
Mathematics 



FIRST YEAR 

Latin 

Literature 1 
Algebra 

Physical Science 
Music 

SECOND YEAR 

Caesar 

Literature 3 
Roman History 
Zoology or Physiol- 
ogy 
Drawmg 1 

THIRD YEAR 

Ovid or German 
Composition 3 
Modern History 
Plane Geometry 

FOURTH YEAR 

Horace or German 
Literature 8 
Physics 

U. S. History or 
Mathematics 



Latin 

Literature 2 
Algebra 
Botany 



Cicero 

Literature 4 
Medieval History 
Botany or 
Physiology 



Vergil or German 

Literature 6 

Civics 

Solid Geometry 



German or Ind. Hist. 

Literature 9 
Physics 
Economics or 
Mathematics 



COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 

Penmanship and Business Methods Business English 

Spelling Literature 1 Literature 2 

Composition 1 General Mathematics General Mathematics 

General Mathematics Physical Science Botany 

Physical Science Music 

SECOND YEAR 



Accounting 
Commercial Arith. 
Composition 2 
Botany 



Accounting 
Commercial Arith. 
Literature 3 
Physiology 

THIRD YEAR 



Accounting 
Medieval History 
Literature 4 
Physical Geografy 



Shorthand and 
Typewriting 
Literature 5 
United States 
Chemistry 



Shorthand and Shorthand and 

Typewriting Typewriting 

Composition 3 Literature 6 

HistoryUnited States HistoryCivics 

Chemistry Chemistry 



Shorthand and 
Typewriting 
Literature 9 
Economics 
Physics 



FOURTH YEAR 

Shorthand and 
Typewriting 
Literature 10 
Physics 
Physical Geografy 



Shorthand and 

Typewriting, Offls 

Training 
Commercial Geografy 
Industrial History 
Physics 



Illinois State Normal University 

MANUAL TRAINING CURRICULUM 



47 



Bench Work 
Composition 1 
Algebra 
.Physical Science 



FIRST YEAR 
Mechanical Drawing 
Literature 1 
Algebra 
Physical Science 

SECOND YEAR 

Bench Work 
Literature 3 



Mechanical Drawing 
Composition 2 . 

Mechanics Arithmetic Drawmg 1 
Zoology Zoology or Physiol 

ogy 
Music 



Bench Work 
Literature 2 
Algebra 
Botany 

Lathe Work 
Literature 4 
Bookkeeping 
Botany or Physiology 



Lathe Work 
Literature 5 
Plane Geometry 
U. S. History 



Art Metal or Cement 

Construction 
Literature 7 
Physics 
Economics 



THIRD YEAR 

Furniture 

Design 

Plane Geometry 

U. S. History 

Gymnastics 

FOURTH YEAR 

Pottery 
Literature 8 
Physics 

Industrial History or 
Physical Geografy 



Furniture 
Literature 6 
Plane Geometry 

Civics 



Bookbinding 
Literature 9 
Physics 
Commercial Geografy 



HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 



Food and Cookery 
Composition 1 
Physical Science 
Greek History 



Sewing 

Color 

General Mathematics 

Zoology 

Gymnastics 



Millinery and 

Dressmaking 
Costume Design 
Chemistry 
U. S. History 



Experimental 

ery 
Literature 7 
Physics 
Economics 



Cook- 



FIRST YEAR 

Study of the home 
Literature 1 
Physical Science 
Roman History 

SECOND YEAR 

Sewing 
Design 

General Mathematics 
Zoology or Physiol- 
ogy 
Gymnastics 

THIRD YEAR 

Textils 

Composition 3 
Chemistry 
U. S. History 

FOURTH YEAR 

Institutional Cook- 
ery 

Literature 8 

Physics 

Industrial History or 
Physical Geografy 



Household Manage- 
ment 
Literature 2 
Botany 
Physical Geografy 

Dressmaking 
Home Decoration 
General Mathematics 
Botany or Physiology 
Gymnastics 



Millinery and 

Dressmaking 
Literature 6 
Chemistry 
Civics 

Dietetics and Invalid 

Cookery 
Literature 9 
Physics „ 

Commercial Geografy 



48 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM 



Fall 
Domestic Animals 
Composition 1 
Manual Training 
Physical Science 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Animal Production 
Literature 1 
Farm Arithmetic 
Physical Science 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring 
Orchard and Garden 
Literature 2 
Mechanical Drawing 
Botany 



Farm Crops Soil Physics Crop Production 

Composition 2 Literature 3 Literature 4 

General Mathematics General Mathematics General Mathematics 
Zoology Zoology or Physiol- Botany or Physiology 

ogy 

THIRD YEAR 

Cement Construction Farm Bookkeeping Farm Machinery 

and Drainage Composition 3 Literature 6 

Literature 5 Chemistry Chemistry 

Chemistry United States History Civics 

U. S. History 

FOURTH YEAR 

Soil Fertility Farm Management Animal and Plant Im- 

Literature 7 Literature 8 provement 

Physics Physics Literature 9 

Economics Industrial History or Physics 

Physical Geografy Commercial Geografy 

The Agricultural Science in the foregoing program is in strict 
accordance with the program for agricultural high schools recom- 
mended by the Illinois Educational Commission. 

It is expected that the strictly agricultural work shall occupy 
about one-fourth of the time of the student, and that it shall be 
taught from a vocational standpoint to prospectiv or probable 
farmers. 

Practically the entire range of farm affairs is coverd by this 
course, and it is believd that a good basis will be establisht for 
intelligent reading by the young farmer. The Normal University 
farm is not used for experiment to discover new agricultural 
truth, but for demonstration of good farming methods, of the ef- 
fects of good fertilizers and rotations, of proper selection and 
treatment of seed, of modes of cultivation, of the proper care of 
live stock, and other details of farm practis. With the facilities 
and equipment at the command of the State Normal University, it 
is believd that the proper material, curriculum, and method of 
an agricultural high school can be workt out. 

The other studies in the agricultural program ar chosen with 
regard to their value to the farmer-citizen. They comprise natu- 
ral science, government, and such studies in English as will lead to 
fair skill in the use of the mother tung and to an appreciation of 
the best Hterature. 



Illinois State Normal University 



49 



\n 






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54 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



STATEMENT OF COURSES 
IN DEPARTMENTS 



EDUCATION 

COURSE ONE 
The Teaching Process 

The major topics of this course ar (1) the larger social mean- 
ing of the public school, and the aims of teaching; (2) the choice of 
teaching as a vocation and qualifications for the work; (3) organi- 
zation of the school, and the daily program; (4) the course of study, 
and how the teacher can make the best use of it; (5) the lesson 
and the lerning process, including the problem of pupils' study; 
(6) organization of lessons; (7) observation studies in the Training 
School; (8) the problems of school government and disciplin; 
(9) supervizion and the teacher. 

This course, or its equivalent, is required of all candidates for 
the Normal-School diploma. It is offerd in fall, winter, spring, and I 
both summer terms. 

The text, Colgrove's The Teacher and The School, is supple- 
mented by Strayer's The Teaching Process and other library read- 
ings. 

COURSE TWO 

Elements of Psychology 

The aim of the course is to acquaint prospectiv teachers with 
the principal types of mental behavior in relation to efficient 
lerning and teaching. The principal topics ar instincts and inborn 
abilities, sensations, the formation of habits, feelings and emo- 
tions, and mental fatig. Five kinds of habits ar studied: moral 
habits, habits of muscular skill, lerning verbatim, substance lern- 
ing, and the solution of original problems. In addition to the 
five recitations two laboratory periods per week ar required, which 
ar arranged by consultation with the instructor. Prerequisit: a 
knowledge of the nervous system equal to what is included in 
Biology 4 or Physiology 9. All terms. Major. 

Texts : Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology, and Kirkpatrick's 
Fundamentals of Child Study. 



r 



Illinois State Normal University 55 

COURSE THREE 
General Method 
The aim of this course is to derive methods of instruction 
om an examination of educational aims, materials and psycho- 
,gical principles. The order of development is as foU^.^^ fm 
•education; materials of education; mental processes mvolyd ^n 
Tning; interest, incentiv and motiv; forms of mstruction-mduc- 
on and deduction; method in habit-formation; method m the 
)rmation of worthy ideals and prejudises; review of organization 
f subiect-matter, and effectiv devices. All terms. ,, ,^ . , 

Texts: Charter's Methods of Teaching, McMurry's Method of 

he Recitation. 

COURSE FOUR 

School Organization, Supervision and Management 
(a^ The nature of institutional life in general (b) The 
undamental law of the school, (c) The logical evolution of the 
chool thru its fundamental law. (d) The school at work under 
helaw of its constitution, (e) The social and ethical training 
n the working of the school, (f) ^ detaild discussion of the 
problems of school supervizion. Text-books: Tomv^mss Philos- 
ophy of School Management, Dresslar's School Hygiene. All terms. 

COURSE FIVE 
Principles of Education 

A study of fundamental principles underlying educational 
activities. Leading topics: educational aims, the individual and 
society, the sources of human conduct, heredity and environment 
modifiability of conduct thru educational agencies, educational 
values of the studies and of other school agencies. ^ , ^ ^, 

Texts- Ruediger's Principles of Education, Schroeder s Psy- 
chology of Conduct, supplemented by library readings. Winter, 
spring, and first summer terms. 

COURSE SIX 
History of Education 
An elementary course covering the period from the Renais- 
sance to the present. The main European and American influences 
which hav formd our present theories of education and school 
systems, elementary and secondary, ar studied, and in this con- 
nection selections from the educational writings of Comemus 
Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbert ^Pencer and Ho ace 
Mann ar red. Text: Monroe's Briefer Course. Fall term, hrst 
summer term. 



56 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SEVEN 
High School Problems 

This is a junior college course and may be taken in place of 
Education One by prospectiv high-school teachers who ar candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Education. It deals with the 
educational problems of adolescence: (1) the transition from later 
childhood and elementary education to youth and secondary edu- 
cation; (2) physical, mental and social characteristics of adoles- 
cents; (3) needs and instinctiv interests of this period; (4) the 
high-school course of study as determind by present needs and 
social outlook; (5) the problems of social life, athletics, organiza- 
tions; (6) study and discussion of actual teaching problems in the 
University High School; (7) high-school administration and man- 
agement. Winter and spring terms. 

Prerequisits : graduation from a four-year accredited high 
school, or its equivalent, and Elementary Psychology. 

Text: Johnston and others. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

The History of Education 

Chief purposes and values.— These courses aim (1) to make 
an interpretation of history in terms of man's conscious, rational 
effort to improve the total conditions of life and realize the higher 
human ideals by means of education; (2) more specifically to trace 
the origin and development of educational ideals and processes in 
their relation to dominant life-problems; (3) to form more ac- 
curate standards of evaluation and practical judgment concerning 
present educational conditions; (4) to get inspiration and motiv 
from the lives of persons who hav made eminent contributions to 
the solution of the human problem in the field of education. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Ancient and Medieval Education 

Of ancient education main emfasis is put upon that of the 
Greeks and the Romans. The education that resulted from the 
ideals of the early Christians and the medieval churchmen is 
traced thru the monastic era and the age of scholasticism. The 
beginning of the secularization of education is studied in the train- 
ing of feudal chivalry and in the rise of the universities. Fall 
term. 

Prerequisits: good courses in ancient and medieval history. 

Textbooks : the first and second volumes of Graves's History of 
Education. Monroe's Source Book, Painter's Great Pedagogical 
Essays, and other library references ar used for source reading. 



Illinois State Normal University 57 

COURSE NINE 
Modern European Education 

The Renaissance, the Reformation and the beginnings of the 
realistic movement ar studied to find their educational import in 
Jthe transition of the modern era of science, democracy and the new 
humanism. The leading educational theorists and reformers ar 
studied in relation to education in both Europe and America. 
Present tendencies ar examind and interpreted as attempts to 
solv national problems and promote the attainment of the chang- 
ling ideals of human progress. Winter term. 

Prerequisits : good courses in modern European history. 

Textbooks : the second volume of Graves's History of Educa- 
tion, and Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education. 

COURSE TEN 
Education in the United States 

A genetic study of American education is made under the 
following main divisions: (1) transplanted forms of European 
education found in the Colonial period; (2) early American edu- 
cation as found in voluntary enterprizes and in the beginnings of 
free state systems before 1860; (3) the development of public 
Education since 1860; (4) the present education situation in its 
relation to the life of the people and national character. The history 
of special lines of educational advance is noted in the study 
of special topics; e. g., "vocational education," "science in the 
curriculum," etc. Spring term. 

Textbooks: Dexter's Education in the United States, and 
Thwing's Education in the United States Since the Civil War. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Educational Psychology. First Half. 

Courses 10 and 11 together form a detaild study of the psy- 
chological aspect of some of the main educational problems. 
They also give teachers, principals, and superintendents training 
in attacking experimentally problems in methods of teaching, in 
testing the senses and lerning abilities of children, and in read^^ 
ing the literature of the subject. In the fall term the topics ar 
mental inheritance; correlation of abilities; theories of interest; 
types of lerning and habits; dilTiculties in the formation of habits 
and how to overcome them; the relations of feeling and emotion 
to education; conditions affecting retention; experimental studies 
of methods of teaching spelling, writing, and arithmetic. Two 
hours of laboratory work a week in addition to the five recitations, 
the former to be arranged by consultation. 

Prerequisit: Course 2. Fall term, first Summer term. 

Texts: Thorndike's Educational Psychology, Briefer Course, 
and Parker's Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 



58 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE TWELV 

A continuation of Course 11, by which it should be preceded, 
if possible. The principal topics ar : the training of the imagina- 
tion, the transfer of training, mental fatig, school tests of the 
senses, the Binet tests, and other tests of nativ intelligence. Stu- 
dents ar given practis in testing children in the training school, 
and shown how to introduce such tests into schools as ar de- 
sirable. Laboratory arrangements, the same as in Coursell. Win- 
ter term. Major. 

Texts: The same as in Course 11, together with much library 
reading. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Ethics and the Evolution of Morality 

The factors, processes, and main lines of moral development 
among the Greeks, the Hebrews, and in modern times ar studied. 
Ethical theories ar considerd and evaluated as factors in mod- 
ern history. Typical fases of present moral situations analyzed 
and hypothetical solutions thought out. How the school, as one 
of the co-operativ agencies in the creation and maintenance of 
ethical ideals and moral standards, can most effectivly do its 
part is quite fully considerd. Concrete problems for study ar 
found in daily incidents in school and out. Spring term, 1918. 

Prerequisits: good courses in the social sciences — history, 
sociology, economics, and politics. Offerd in the spring term of 
even-numberd years to alternate with Course Fourteen. 

Textbook: Dewey and Tufts' Ethics. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 
Social Ethics 

This course is an interpretation, or evaluation, of character- 
istic movements and events in American history in their bearing 
upon the liberation and direction of the energies of the people and 
the emancipation of the human spirit in accordance with the laws 
of economy, justis, and social redemption. It considers the ethical 
import of present tendencies to legislation, economic reform, and 
social betterment. It examins the ethics of leading vocations, such 
as business, the law, engineering, bilding, speculativ enterprizes, 
parenthood. It includes also a consideration of the ethical sig- 
nificance of household and municipal sanitation, personal helth, 
and social hygiene. Spring term, 1917. 

Prerequisits: see Course Thirteen. 

Text: The Socialized Conscience, Coffin. 



Illinois State Normal University 59 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
School Administration 

Fall Term: The function of the national government, the 
state and local units of administration, the financing of the school, 
lithe school plant, the superintendent and the teachmg staff, the 
problems of supervizion, the evolution of the course of study, the 
iadministration of supplementary and special education. 

Winter Term : The application of scientific methods m de- 
termining the efiiciency of a school system, the interpretation of 
school statistics, school records, school reports, school surveys. 

Spring Term : Problems of high-school administration. Cur- 
riculum, equipment, class organization, technique of method and 
of management, social activities, six-year and four-year programs, 
the relation of the elementary school and to the college, brief com- 
parativ study of for en secondary schools. , ^ ,,. r.^ 

Texts- Button and Snedden's Administration of Public Edu- 
cation in the United States, Strayer and Thorndike's Educational 
Administration, McMurry's Elementary School Standards, Brown s 
The American High School, Johnston's The Modem High School, 
supplemented by extensiv library reading. 

I EXTENSION COURSES 

For the professional instruction of teachers in servis the 
State Normal University establisht in 1915-16 study centers at 
Garlinville, Clinton, Danville, Decatur, El Paso, Joliet, LaSalle, 
Lincoln, Mason City, Pekin, Peoria, Petersburg, Pontiac, Spring- 
field, Streator and Virden. 

The subjects studied wer Sociology, Principles of Education, 
History of Education, Geografy, and European History. Twenty- 
one classes wer conducted, with a total enrolment of 512. The 
Extension course coverd thirty weeks (September 20— April 30). 
Each class was visited fifteen times by the instructor for a two- 
hour session. Teachers ar required to devote four hours per week 
to home study and to purchase the regular text book used m the 
course. Other books for reading and reference hav been supplied 
by the local libraries and by the state circulating library. A 
! major credit is given for the year's work. Similar centers will be 
establisht in 1916-17, provided at least twelv teachers unite in 
requesting the same course. 



60 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



MATHEMATICS g* 



ARITHMETIC 

COURSE ONE 

Method in Arithmetic for the First Six School Years 

(12 Weeks) 

The Purpose.— To arrive at the logical order of number knowl- 
edge, to derive its processes from simple counting, and to develop 
and illustrate the principles and methods of instruction in the 
primary and intermediate grades, with observation and analysis 
of work in the Training School. The Illinois State Course of Study 
forms the basis of the work. Text: Cook and Cropsey. 

This course is required of all students in Sections B, C, L, 
M, N; Students with partial high-school courses or with some 
experience in teaching grammar grades should take as prerequisit 
Course 2. Students without high-school training or its equivalent 
should take as preparatories Courses 3 and 4, insted of 2. All 
terms. 

COURSE TWO 
Mensuration and Percentage 

This course is a combination of Courses 3 and 4, six weeks 
each, and is intended for more mature and advanst students. It 
consists of a rapid review of the essentials of those courses as well 
as the emfasizing of the important points as to methods and re- ^ 
suits. The principal topics of the seventh and eighth years' work j 
of the State Course of Study ar included. All terms. 

Texts: For Mensuration, Felmley's Eighth Year Arithme- 
tic. For Percentage, Thurston's Business Arithmetic. 

COURSE THREE 

Mensuration 

The purpose of this course is to arrive experimentally at 
modes of mesuring areas and volumes, to obtain the laws of 
similar figures, to inform the student as to conditions that obtain 
in carpeting, papering, plastering, the mesure of land, lumber, 
brick and concrete work, as well as bights and distances, and the 
application of the Pythagorean proposition. 



Illinois State Normal University 61 

li; In volumes the study pertains to the rectangular solids, the 
■'cylinder, pyramid, cone, and sfere — with many practical prob- 
lems in each drawn from various industries. In the country- 
school courses an effort is made to draw the problems largely from 
the farm and country. All the topics in the eighth-year work of 
the State Course of Study ar included. All terms. 
Text : Felmley's Eighth Year Arithmetic. 

(COURSE FOUR 
Percentage and Business Arithmetic 

As a foundation for the course the relations of percentage 
to fractions and decimals ar discust and a thoro study is made 
of the three type-forms of problems. The main part of the work 
is a consideration of the applications of percentage in profit and 
loss, commission, commercial discount, interest, banking, ex- 
change, stocks and bonds, taxation, and insurance, with special 
emfasis upon the usages of the commercial world. All terms. 

Text : Thurston's Business Arithmetic. 

COURSE FIVE (Twelv Weeks) 

Arithmetic Review 

This course is designd as a review of the fundamental opera- 
tions, factoring, common and decimal fractions, and denominate 
numbers. It is necessary groundwork for all the other courses in 
Arithmetic. Students who do not hav an accurate and redy 
knowledge of the above-named topics take this course as a pre- 
requisit to all other mathematical courses. Fall and winter terms. 
j Text: Hamilton's Complete Arithmetic. 

' BOOKKEEPING 

COURSE ONE (Six Weeks) 

I This course has for its aim to prepare teachers for the work 
in bookkeeping outlined in the State Course of Study. 

From a study and comparison of a number of individual ac- 
counts—cash, merchandize and personal — the principles of debit 
and credit ar derived. These principles ar then applied to the 
i handling of six or more sets of accounts, beginning with the sim- 
plest and including some which require some knowledge of notes 
and drafts and their use in a system of money exchanges. In con- 
nection with the study of a set of accounts, the purpose and form 
of the day-book and journal and their combination in the explana- 
'. tory journal, ar lernd. Most of this work is done in the class. 
Outside of the class pupils use The Sadler-Roive Budget System, 
\ which teaches how to prepare many kinds of business papers, as 
I well as how to keep the journal and ledger. Work in the budget 
i is completed to page 53. In the fall and spring terms a longer 
1 course is taught. Fall, winter, spring, first summer terms. 



62 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ALGEBRA 

The function, scope, and logical order of Algebra, its relation 
to arithmetic, its notation and fundamental ideas. Principles ar 
derived inductivly from concrete problems, and afterwards by rig- 
orous deduction from definition. An attempt is made to teach pupils 
to think clearly and to appreciate the validity of conclusions drawn 
from given data. Especial attention is paid to the language of 
algebra, to describing and relating algebraic processes, and to the 
mode of developing the more diflficult topics. Some attention is 
paid to the principles of the equivalency of equations and sys- 
tems of equations, and the methods of solution ar based on the 
proofs of these principles. The graf is used to illustrate the mean- 
ing of the equations. The work includes quadratics, series, and 
logarithms, and is ofiferd in three forms. An additional electiv 
course is ofiferd in College Algebra. 

COURSE ONE 
Taylor's Elements of Algebra 

This course covers all important and difficult questions in the 
subject. 

Prerequisit: a strong high-school course in Algebra equal to 
the requirement of the best colleges. Spring term. 

COURSE TWO 

Taylor's Elements of Algebra, Chapter I-XV 

Positiv and negativ numbers, the fundamental operations of 
integral literal expressions, factoring, highest common factor and 
lowest common multiple, fractions and fractional equations, sys- 
tems of linear equations. Fall, spring, and first summer terms. 

COURSE THREE 
Chapters XVI-XXXIII 

Evolution, surds, imaginary and complex number, quadratics, 
irrational equations, higher equations, inequalities, proportion, 
theory of exponents, series, binominal theorem and logarithms. 
Fall, winter and both summer terms. 

Courses 2 and 3 ar for students who hav had only a partial 
course in algebra. Together they count as the equal of Course iy 

COURSE FOUR 

Taylor's Elements of Algebra. Chapters I-X 

Positiv and negativ numbers. The fundamental operations in 
integral literal expressions, linear equations in one unknown, fac- 
toring. Fall and spring terms. 



Illinois State Normal University 63 

COURSE FIVE 
Chapters XI-XX 
Highest common factor and lowest common multiple, frac- 
itions and fractional equations, systems of linear equations, evolu- 
Ition, irrational numbers and surds, imaginary and complex num- 
jbers, quadratics in one unknown. Winter term. 

COURSE SIX 
Chapters XXI-XXXIII 
Irrational equations, higher equations, inequalities, theory of 
exponents, indeterminate equations, series, binominal theorem and 
f logarithms. Spring term. 

j Courses 4, 5 and 6 ar for mature students who hav not 
studied algebra. They count as the equivalent of Course 1. 

COURSES SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE 
These ar preparatory courses running thru the year and in- 
tended for young students who hav not studied algebra. They 
count as the equivalent of Courses 4 and 5. Text: Hawkes, Luby, 
and Touton. 

GEOMETRY 

ij These courses cover the ordinary high-school work in plane, 
' solid, and sferical geometry. An attempt is made to teach the sub- 
jects so that the student will realize the value and meaning of its 
principles. The logic of geometry is approacht by gradual steps 
and the first few propositions ar developt syllogistically. In this 
i way the habit and form of reasoning ar establisht. The student 
is expected to work his way relying on his own power of reason- 
ing, and not on mere memory work. More than one-third of the 
time is devoted to original demonstrations. Free use is made of 
supplemental problems and propositions. Considerable attention 
is given to theorems and notions of fundamental importance in the 
structure of the subject as well as to those of practical utility, 
historical notes ar not omitted and modern developments of the 
subject receiv some attention. Three main ends ar kept in view. 
To acquire the essential facts of the subject as properties of space 
' in which we live, to equip the student with the forms of deductiv 
i reasoning, and to make the study a drill in precise thinking and 
i accurate, perspicuous expression. 

Course 1 is for students that hav had previously strong courses 

; in geometry. Students due in one term only should take Course 

' 2 unless they hav previously completed a thoro course in solid 

geometry. Courses 3, 4 and 5 ar for students who hav not had 

geometry. All of plane geometry is required of all students. Text: 

Wentworth- Smith. 



64 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE ONE 
Fundamental conceptions and definitions, theorems in par 
allels, equality of triangles, parallelograms, the circle, proper 
tion, similar figures, area of polygons, regular polygons. Thi 
is a review of plane geometry. Fall and winter terms. 

COURSE TWO 
Lines and planes in space, diedral and polyedral angles an 
polyedrons. The cylinder, cone and sfere. All of solid geometry 
Spring and second summer terms. 

COURSE THREE 
Fundamental conceptions and definitions, theorems in para! 
lels, equality of triangles, parallelograms, the circle, proportioi 
and a part of the work on similar figures. This course cover 
two and one-half books of plane geometry. Fall term, and firs 
summer term. 

COURSE FOUR 

This course completes plane geometry. Spring term an 
second summer term. 

COURSE FIVE 
This course covers the whole of solid and sferical geometry 
It is the same as course 2 above. Spring and first summer terms. 

COURSE SIX X 
Algebra and Geometry Method 

This course is designd for prospectiv teachers of high 
school mathematics. It includes a study of the aims in teachin, 
algebra and geometry, their place in the high-school curriculum 
the subject matter to be offerd, the methods of presentation an< 
the history of important topics. The text-book work is supple 
mented by the reading and discussion of reports, addresses, maga 
zine articles and other books dealing with the present tendencie 
in the teaching of mathematics. Spring term and first summe 
term. 

Texts: Smith's Teaching of Geometry and Young's Teachin 
of Mathematics. 

ELEMENTARY ASTRONOMY 

This course is intended to giwe students such an insight int( 
the organization of the solar system and the problems of astron- 
omy as will enable them to read an almanac and teach mathe- 
matical geografy intelligently. As far as possible, numerical fact; 
ar derived mathematically from the original data. A good dea 
of observation work is required. Wider reading on assignd tppio 
is also a feature of the work. Winter term. 

Text : Howe's Elements. 



Illinois State Normal University 65 

TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

This course covers the following topics: Undetermind co- 
efficients, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponential and loga- 
rithmic series, permutations and combinations, probabilities, con- 
tinued fractions, the summation of series, the general theory of 
equations, the solution of higher equations and the elements of 
determinants. Prerequisit: Course 1, 3 or 6. Fall term. Text: 
College Algebra, Rietz and Crathorne. 

TRIGONOMETRY 

This course includes the theory of trigonometry both in the 
plane and on the sfere, as well as the ordinary application in 
surveying and astronomy. Prerequisit: Plane and solid geom- 
etry, algebra. Winter term only. Text: Phillips and Strong, 
with tables. 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 

This course covers the ordinary analytical methods of inves- 
tigation, the general properties Ox conies, and a brief course in 
the analytical geometry of three dimensions. Prerequisit: Trig- 
onometry and algebra. Spring term only. Text: Ashton. 

PHYSICS 

COURSE ONE 
Elements of Physical Science 

The purpose of this course is three-fold. 1. To lead the stu- 
dent into the habit of observing and studying carefully the 
elements of physical science as applied to every-day life. 2. To 
equip him for efficient work in the teaching of nature study in 
the physical world in the graded and ungraded schools. 3. To 
furnish him with clearer conceptions of those physical principles 
which underlie the study of geografy, physiology, botany, and 
zoology. 

All students who hav not taken a course in physics ar required 
to take this course as a prerequisit to all work in geografy or 
biological science. 

The course covers in a simple way but with much experi- 
mental work the following topics: Elementary meteorology with 
daily non-instrumental observation thruout the term and instru- 
mental observation for one month, the physical principles involvd 
in such wether study; study of lighting systems of the past and 
present; study of heating systems of the past and present; study 
of primitiv water supply and present systems for home supply; 
soil physics; ventilation; sanitation of home and school sur- 
roundings. 



6G Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The experiment work deals with evaporation, condensation, 
air weight, air pressure, air currents, temperature mesurements, 
combustion and oxidation, diffusion of heat, composition (solid 
and volatil matter) of common fuels, distillation of crude petro- 
leum, etc. About one-half of the experimental work is done by 
the class and the rest as demonstrations. Very complete and sys- 
tematic notes ar required and both subject matter and form and 
composition ar daily criticized by the teacher. 

In general, the work of this course is largely determind by 
the phenomena which daily confront the student. Winter term. 

Text-book: General Science, Barber and others. 

COURSES TWO AND THREE 

Physics for grade teachers. (7 hours per week). Course 2 
given in the fall term and both summer terms; Course 3 given in 
the spring term and both summer terms. 

This is a two-term course in physics for elementary teachers. 
The application of physical principles to daily life in the home 
and school ar given special attention. The laboratory work is 
not given as an end in itself but as a means of securing clear con- 
ceptions of the principles and phenomena under consideration. 

Course two covers the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, 
and heat. Considerable attention is given to the following topics: 
water supply, sewage disposal, the heating, ventilation, and humid- 
ifying of residences and school rooms. 

Course 3 covers magnetism, static and current electricity, 
light, and sound. Special attention is given to modern methods 
of lighting residences and school rooms. 

Prerequisits : Algebra, geometry, and course 1 or its equiva- 
lent. 

Texts : Physics of the Household, Lynde, and Laboratory 
Exercizes, Fuller and Brownlee. 

COURSES FOUR AND FIVE > 

Course 4 given in fall and first summer terms; Course 5 
in winter and both summer terms. 

This is a two-term course in physics for high-school teach- 
ers. It is intended for mature students in the normal school and 
for students in the junior college w^ho ar preparing to teach in the 
high school. The more difficult problems of high-school physics 
ar given special attention. The students will be expected to use 
logarithms in the solution of problems. The technique of high- 
school laboratory management receivs due attention. 

Course 4 covers mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, mo- 
lecular physics and heat. 

Course 5 covers magnetism, static and current electricity, 
sound, light, and radio-activity. 

Prerequisits: A working knowledge of algebra including 
logarithms, geometry, and some previous work in physics. 

Texts: Practical Physics, Black and Davis, and Laboratory 
Exercizes, Fuller and Brownlee. 



Illinois State Normal University 67 

COURSE SIX 

Method in Physical Science for the Elementary Schools 

This course in physical science is for graduates of four-year 
high schools who hav taken accredited courses in physics and 
chemistry. The purpose of the course is to bild up a course in 
nature study in the physical world. It contemplates the following 
ends: 

(a) The discovery of the pedagogical basis for the study of 
physical science in the school. 

(b) The consideration of a course of study involving the 
physical sciences in their relation to daily life. 

(c) Occasional observation of work in the Training School. 
Prerequisit: High school physics and chemistry. Winter 

and spring terms. 

Text-book: General Science, Barber. 

TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

SENIOR COLLEGE 

In the following courses emfasis is placed upon the appli- 
cation of the principles in life as well as upon an academic treat- 
ment of the principles themselvs. It is intended that these 
courses shall produce resourceful high-school teachers, therefore 
every effort is made to keep fairly close to high-school methods 
and high-school materials., -^ 

COURSE SEVEN 

Applied Mechanics 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
counting as 5 hours). Spring term. 

This is a Junior College course. It covers applied mechanics, 
a brief study of the trigonometric functions and a use of trigono- 
metric tables. 

Prerequisits: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 

Texts: Elementary Practical Mechanics, Jameson, and Exer- 
cizes in Mechanics, Jameson. Essentials of Physics, Hering, will be 
used as a reference in all college courses in physics. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Magnetism and Electricity 

(b hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
counting as 5 hours). Fall term. 

Prerequisit: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 

Texts: Elements of Electricity for Technical Students, 
Timbie; and Laboratory Manual, Direct and Alternating Currents, 
Clewell. 



68 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



COURSE NINE 

Light and Sound 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
counting as 5 hours.) Winter term. 

Prerequisit: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 

Texts: Handbook of Acoustics, Harris, and Essentials of 
Physics, Hering. 

COURSE TEN 

Heat 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
counting as 5 hours.) Spring term. 

Prerequisits: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent and trigonometry. 

Texts: Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat, Millikan, 
and Heat, Randall. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Laboratory Assistant 

Method in Physics and Chemistry for the high-school. (10 hours 
per week, counting as 5 hours.) Any term. 
This course deals with both the theoretical and the practical 
questions arising in the management of an elementary course in 
physics or chemistry. The course contemplates the following 
ends, on the side of — 

Theory: 1. Purpose of a high-school course in physics or 
Chemistry. 

2. Method of presentation of subject matter. 

3. The problem of securing profitable notebook work. 

4. The most profitable work in the poorly-equipt 

laboratory. 
Practis: 1. Designing, making, and testing simple appar- 
atus for the laboratory. 
2. Laboratory assistant in Course 2 or 3, or Course 

1 or 2 in Chemistry. 
Helping to care for notebooks. 
Prerequisits: Courses 4 and 5 and Courses 1, 2 and 7 in 
Chemistry. This course may count as one term of teaching. 

Text-book: The Teaching of Physics and Chemistry in Sec- 
ondary Schools, Smith and Hall. 



Illinois State Normal University 69 

CHEMISTRY 

SELECTION OF COURSES 
Candidates for the Normal-School diploma who ar conditiond 
in Chemistry should take Course 1 during the winter, spring, 
or first or second summer term. Candidates for the diploma in 
Household Science should take Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8. Candidates 
for the diploma in Agriculture should take Courses 1, 2, 3, and 5. 
Students preparing to teach chemistry in the high schools should 
take Courses 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7, or 4 and 8 insted of 5 and 6. 

COURSES ONE, TWO, AND THREE 

General Chemistry. (3 hours per week recitations, 4 hours 
per week laboratory.) These courses include a year's work in 
inorganic chemistry of college grade and extend thru the fall, 
winter, and spring terms. Course 1 is repeated each term, in- 
cluding the mid-spring and the two summer terms. Course 2 is 
also offerd in the first summer term, Course 3 in the second 
summer term. Course 1 is required of all candidates for the 
Normal-School diploma who hav not had a course in high-school 
chemistry or its equivalent, extending thru at least a half year. 
The three courses ar required of all candidates for the Domestic 
Science and Agriculture diplomas, irrespectiv of whether a high- 
school course in chemistry has been taken or not. 

Course 1 is the study of the elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitro- 
gen, and carbon and their compounds, of air, of the properties 
of gases, of solution, of fuels, of the fundamental laws and theories 
of chemistry, of of chemical calculations. Extensiv application 
of chemistry to daily life is made. 

Courses 2 and 3 continue the study of the non-metals and 
metals. Sulfur, the halogens, silicon, boron, fosforus, sodium, 
potassium, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, copper, mer- 
cury, silver, gold, led, tin, manganese, chromium, vanadium, 
tungsten, zinc, and platinum and their various compounds ar 
studied. The problem of soil fertility is studied. The salt 
products industry, the silicate industry, the cement industry, and 
the iron and steel industry ar studied. Numerous applications 
of chemistry to the problems of the household ar considerd. 

Text: A Course in General Chemistry, McPherson and Hen- 
derson. 

COURSES FOUR AND EIGHT 

Organic Chemistry. (4 hours per week recitations, 2 hours 
per week laboratory.) Fall and winter terms. 

This is a study of the carbon compounds with reference to 
hydrocarbons, alcohols, organic acids, carbohydrates, fats, pro- 
teids, foods, and feeding stuffs, food adulterants, and the chemis- 
try of vital processes. Animal and vegetable textil fibres ar also 
studied. About one-fifth of the time of the course is devoted to 



70 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

study of the method of teaching high-school chemistry. The 
organization, content, and methods of instruction ar considerd. 
In the laboratory the chemical reactions of fats, carbohydrates, 
and proteins ar studied and simple digestion experiments ar car- 
ried out. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, and 3 or their equivalent. 

Texts: Organic Chemistry, Norris. Experimental Organic 
Chemistry, Norris. 

COURSE FIVE 

Qualitativ Analysis. (9 hours per week laboratory, 1 hour 
per week recitation.) Fall term. 

This course is intended for students who expect to teach 
chemistry in high schools. It is based on the ionic theory and the 
mass law and presupposes a knowledge of general chemistry. The 
course includes the separation and identification of the common 
metals and acidsl Analysis of compounds and mixtures is under- 
taken, a number of unknown substances being examind. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, and 3 or their equivalent. 

Text: Qualitative Analysis, Bailey and Cady. Other works 
on qualitativ analysis ar consulted frequently. 

COURSES SIX AND SEVEN 

Quantitativ Analysis. (8 hours per week laboratory, 1 hour 
per week recitation.) Winter and spring terms. 

After the student has become familiar with the standard 
methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis he applies these 
methods to the analysis of commercial substances. Agricultural 
products, including milk, butter, cheese, fertilizers, feeding stuffs, 
soils, and crop residues ar examind. The analysis and calorimetry 
of solid and gaseous fuels is undertaken. The sanitary analysis 
of air and water is done. Students taking advanst work in 
Domestic Science may undertake the examination of the common 
foods and reagents of the household. 

A course in method of teaching high-school chemistry simi- 
lar to that given in connection with Courses 4 and 8 above is given 
in connection with Courses 5, 6 and 7. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, 3 and 5. 

Text: Elementary Quantitativ Chemical Analysis, Lincoln 
and Walton. 

The opportunity of practis teaching in chemistry in the Uni- 
versity High School is offerd to students who hav the necessary 
preparation in the science. These high-school classes extend thru- 
out the year. 



Illinois State Normal University 71 



BIOLOGY 



NATURE STUDY 

COURSE ONE 

Agricultural Nature Study — Fall Aspect 

This course is designd especially for students who ar regis- 
terd in the programs for country teachers. The work consists 
of observations and experiments in the laboratory, garden, green- 
house, and campus. Chief topics: Insects, birds, trees, shrubs, 
fall wild flowers, garden plants, including a detaild study of the 
parts of a flower, pollination and seed forming, characteristics, 
habits of growth, and economic value of some common vegetables, 
propagation by budding, cuttings, and bulbs, a detaild study of 
wheat and corn, weeds, fungi and fungous diseases. 

The course is based largely upon the State Course in Nature- 
Study Agriculture. It considers material available in country 
and village districts, methods of manipulation and presentation, 
including simple experiments, observation field trips, and collec- 
tions. Notes and drawing ar kept. 

Texts: Beginnings of Agriculture, Mann. Lesson Plants in 
Nature-Study Agriculture. Fall and summer terms. 

COURSE TWO 
Agricultural Nature Study — Spring Aspect 
The general plan of this course is the same as in Course 1. 
Special topics : Grafting, soil with simple experiments in drainage, 
capillarity, germination tests, planning and planting a small 
vegetable and flower garden, poultry. 
Prerequisit: Course 1. 
Text: Same as in Course 2. Spring term. 

COURSE THREE 
Invertebrate Zoology 

This is a general introductory course in elementary zoology 
designd to meet, in part, the needs of those who ar preparing to 
teach zoology in the high school or nature study in the elementary 
school. Animals from each of the groups of invertebrates which 
ar represented in our local fauna ar studied with special reference 
to their economic relations. The work consists of fleld and 
laboratory studies of living animals; microscopic study of protozoa; 
lectures; text and library assignments. Stress is laid on the 
evidences of evolution and the adaptations of animals to their 
modes of life. Notes and drawings ar kept. Fall and both summer 
terms. 

Text: Linville and Kelley's Text-book in General Zoology. 



72 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FOUR 
Vertebrate Zoology 

This is a general elementary course in vertebrate zoology de- 
signd particularly for those who ar preparing to teach zoology 
in the high school. It deals with the classification, anatomy, physi- 
ology, evolution, and economic relations of vertebrate animals. 
The work consists of experiments on living animals; dissections; 
study of museum specimens; field study of birds and other ani- 
mals, lectures, text and library assignments. Special emfasis is 
laid on the habits and economic relations of birds and on evolution 
of the animal kingdom. Notes and drawings ar kept. Winter and 
first summer terms. 

Text: Same as in Course 3. 

COURSE FIVE 

Phanerogamic Botany 

This is a general elementary course in botany dealing with the 
so-cald flowering plants and seed plants. It is designd to meet, in 
part, the needs of those who are preparing to teach botany in the 
high school or nature study in the elementary school. It deals 
with the elements of morfology, physiology, classification, and 
ecology of seed plants. The work consists of laboratory experi- 
ments and observations with notes and drawings, field trips, text 
and library assignments. Chief topics: The relations of the plant 
to soil, air, and light; the relations of the flowers to insects; the 
processes of fotosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, food storage, 
and digestion. Spring and both summer terms. 

Texts : A Text-Book in Botany, Coulter, and Gray's New Manual 
of Botany. 

COURSE SIX 

Cryptogamic Botany 

This is a general elementary course in botany dealing with the 
so-cald non-flowering, or seedless, plants. A study is made of rep- 
resentativ lower forms establishing an evolutionary sequence from 
the algae to the seed plants and the evolution of the plant king- 
dom is discust. Special emfasis is placed on the economic forms, 
viz.: the yeasts, molds, bacteria, and parasitic fungi. Numerous 
experiments are made with cultures of bacteria and simple bac- 
teriological methods ar demonstrated. This course is designd for 
those preparing to teach botany in the high school. Fall and first 
summer term. 

Texts : A Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, and Bacteria, Yeasts, 
and Mold in the Home, Conn. 



Illinois State Normal University 73 

COURSE SEVEN 
Nature-Study — Material and Method 

This course is designd for students who ar preparing to teach 
nature study in the grades. It includes a study of material 
suited to the various grades, the educational bearings of the sub- 
ject with extensiv readings, and lesson plans for the different 
grades. Fall, spring, and summer terms. 

Text : . Practical Nature-Study, Coulter and Patterson. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Physiology and Hygiene 

An elementary course for students who hav not studied zoology 
or physics, but of sufficient extent to qualify for the examination 
for second-grade elementary certificates. Especial attention is 
paid to questions of personal hygiene. 

Text: Advanst Physiology and Hygiene, Conn and Budding- 
ton. 

COURSE NINE 

The Human Body 

The anatomy, physiology, and hygiene of the human body 
ar considerd from the biological standpoint. The organs and 
their functions ar considerd together. Free use is made of 
manikin, skeleton, and many models. One general dissection and 
a demonstration of the sheep's hart and lungs ar made before 
the class. Brief microscopic study of the principal tissues is made. 

The last two weeks of the term ar given to hygiene and sani- 
tation. 

Prerequisits: Elementary physics and zoology. Fall, winter, 
and spring terms for women only. A winter term class for men 
only. Summer term classes include both sexes. 

Text: Hough and Sedgwick's Human Mechanism. 

COURSE TEN 

Taxonomic Biology 

This course includes a study of the trees and shrubs of the 
campus and nearby plants of nativ forest; of the birds that may 
be seen here during the term; of the decorativ plants grown in 
the school garden, greenhouse, and local nurseries; and of the 
wild flowering plants of the local flora, all largely from the tax- 
onomic point of view. The relativ value, uses, and characteris- 
tics of the different trees, shrubs and flowers and the economic 
relations of birds receiv due attention. There ar over one bun- 



74 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

dred species of trees and shrubs on the campus and over one hun- 
dred species of birds ar quite common in the vicinity during the 
spring term, and ahnost every variety of decorativ plant grown in 
this climate may be found in the school garden, on the campus or 
in the local nurseries. Familiarity with all these and with the 
local wild flora constitutes a fund of information which should 
prove very valuable to the teacher of high-school biology or of 
nature study. 

Birds and plants will be studied on alternate days, so that 
students who can not take the whole course may take either part 
of the course as a minor, counting for one-half credit. Spring 
term. 

Texts: Gray's New Manual of Botany and Reed's Land and 
Song Birds. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Biology Method 

This course consists of lectures and assignd readings on the 
method of instruction in biology. It includes the consideration of 
the educational values of biology, the outlining of courses of study 
in botany, in zoology, and in physiology; the details of laboratory 
management, the construction of simple apparatus, and the collec- 
tion and preservation of materials. Five hours per week. Winter 
term. 

Text: Students are a?kt to buy and read Ganong's Teaching 
Botanist, altho it will not be used as a text. 



SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE TWELV 

General Zoology ^ 

Three double laboratory periods, one lecture, and one quiz per 
week. This course extends thruout the year, beginning with the 
fall term, 1917. 

This is a general college course in zoology, dealing with ani- 
mals exclusiv of insects. It consists of a more or less intensiv 
study of certain type forms representing the different groups of 
animals. The morfolog>% histology, physiology, ecology, em- 
bryology, behavior, and economic relations of animals all receiv 
consideration. Students ar permitted to make for themselvs 
permanent microscope slides and to prepare other illustrativ ma- 
terial which will be of use in high-school teaching. 

Prerequisit: Zoology 3 and 4. 

Text: Eegnev's College Zoology. 



Illinois State Normal University 75 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
General Entomology 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation 
per week. Field trips on Saturdays. Fall term, 1916. 

This is a general introductory course in entomology, dealing 
with the morfology, physiology, ecology, and classification of in- 
sects. The laboratory work consists of dissections of some of the 
larger insects, of experiments on some of the fases of insect be- 
havior; or life-history studies and of the making of permanent 
microscope slides of insect organs and tissues. Students ar ex- 
pected to make collections of insects and to lern how to use keys 
in classifying them. 

Text: Folsom's Entomology. 

Prerequisit: Course 3 or equivalent. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

Animal Evolution 

Five hours per week. Winter term, 1916-17. 

In this course the various theoretical fases of biology which do 
not require laboratory study ar considerd. The doctrin of evolu- 
tion constitutes the main thred of the course, but especial emfasis 
is placed on the subjects of heredity and plant and animal breed- 
ing. The subject of animal behavior receivs some attention. This 
course should be of equal value to the student who is studying 
science for its own sake and to the student in the agricultural 
course who is seeking principles which hav practical application 
in his work. 

Prerequisit: Courses 3 and 4 or their equivalent. 

Text : Jordan and Kellogg's Evolution and Animal Life. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
Economic Entomology 

Three double periods, 1 lecture and 1 recitation per week. 
Spring term, 1917. 

This course deals specifically with the insect pests which af- 
fect the plants of field, garden, and orchard, and with those which 
ar responsible for the spred of human and animal diseases. Many 
of the double periods ar spent in the field studying the insects at 
work on the plants. Life-history studies ar made and preventiv 
mesures ar discust. The library is supplied with an abundance of 
literature on the subject. 

Prerequisit: Course 13 or equivalent. 



76 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SIXTEEN 
Plant Morfology 

This course consists of a detaild study of representativ types 
from each of the four great groups of the plant kingdom, all from 
the morfological point of view. Plants ar selected for study which 
illustrate all the various methods of reproduction and which con- 
stitute a complete evolutionary series. The laboratory work in- 
cludes some training in historical methods and the students ar 
allowd to prepare for themselvs permanent miscroscopic slides of 
such material studied as will be of value to a high-school teacher. 

Prerequisit:- Courses 5 and 6 or equivalent. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, 
Vol. I. 

Two double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation per 
week. Fall term, 1916-17, and each alternate year thereafter. 

COURSE SEVENTEEN 
Plant Physiology 

This course consists of a detaild study of the various physi- 
ological processes of plants, such as nutrition, growth, and move- 
ment. The plant cell as the unit of function is studied in much 
detail and the influence of external stimuli on plants and the re- 
lation of plants to soil and other environmental conditions ar topics 
which receiv attention. Permission is given the students to make 
for themselvs permanent microscopic slides showing sections of 
the principal organs of the typical higher plants. 

Prerequisit: Courses 5 and 6 or their equivalent. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, 
Vol. I. 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation 
per week. Winter term. 

COURSE EIGHTEEN 
Plant Ecology 

In this course a study of the influence of environmental fac- 
tors on plant structures and plant distribution forms the basis of 
the work. The more important factors which control plant growth 
and development ar considerd and many applications of the princi- 
ples discoverd in this study ar made to agricultural practises. The 
course includes field work and the solving of simple ecological 
problems by the different members of the class. 

Prerequisit: Courses 16 and 17 or equivalent. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, 
Vol. II. 

Three double periods for laboratory and field work, 1 lecture, 
and 1 quiz per week. Some field work on Saturdays. Spring term, 
1917. 



Illinois State Normal University 77 

COURSE NINETEEN 
Plant Pathology 

This course consists of a study of the more important plant 
diseases which are caused by fungi, bacteria, and slime molds. 
During the early weeks of the fall term a large part of the time 
is spent in making collections of diseased plants and plant organs. 
The rest of the time is spent in lerning to identify the different 
diseases, in making culture studies of the parasitic organisms, in 
the making of permanent microscopic slides of diseased plant tis- 
sues, and in the consideration of preventiv and curativ mesures. 

Text : Duggar's Plant Diseases. 

Prerequisit: Botany 5 and 6. 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 quiz per 
week. Some field work on Saturdays. Fall term and first half of 
winter term, 1917-18. 

COURSE TWENTY 
General Bacteriology 

This is a general laboratory course in bacteriology. Bacteria 
ar considerd in their relations to soil fertility, to food preservation 
and to animal diseases, including human diseases. Culture studies 
of some typical forms ar made and the general technique of the 
subject is masterd. The work includes the making of permanent 
microscope slides which become the property of the students. 

Text: Jordan's General Bacteriology. 

Prerequisit: Botany 5 and 6. 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 quiz per 
week. Last half of winter term and spring term, 1916. 

COURSE TWENTY-ONE 

Nature-Study Supervision 

A course for superintendents and supervisors of nature study. 
It includes a survey of nature-study material, observation of na- 
ture-study lessons in the training school, practis in conducting 
classroom and field work, discussion of the present problems in 
nature study with plans for their solution. Fall term. 

COURSE TWENTY-TWO 

Nature- Study Organization 

This course follows Course 21. It deals with the winter as- 
i pect of nature-study material, trees, birds, etc., physical and 
chemical phenomena that may be used in elementary grades, ar- 
ranging a course in nature study. Winter term. 



I 



78 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE TWENTY-THREE 
School and Home Gardens 

Work in practical gardening, with experiments, methods of 
managing and directing children's gardens, the relation of gar- 
dening to other fases of nature study, supervizion of class gar- 
dens and inspection of home gardens of the children. Spring , ft 
term. t 

COURSE TWENTY-FOUR j I 

General Bacteriology 

A study of the true bacteria, yeasts, molds, and pathogenic 
protozoa — a course intended for the general scientific student, 
the student of domestic science, hygiene, sanitation and agricul- 
ture. Two hours per week lecture or recitation and six hours 
laboratory work. 

Jordan's General Bacteriology, or Buchanan's Household 
Bacteriology will be used as reference. Fall term. 

COURSE TWENTY-FIVE 

The Nutritiv Process 

An advanst course in physiology dealing especially with di- 
gestion and nutrition, and required of all students graduating in 
domestic science. 

Prerequisits ar Chemistry 1 and Zoology 3. Winter term. 

Text: Stiles' Nutritional Physiology. 

COURSE TWENTY-SIX 

Sanitation and Public Hygiene 

A systematic application of chemistry, physiology, and bac- 
teriology to modern helth problems. Recommended to students 
who ar to graduate in domestic science. 

Prerequisits: Biology 9 or 24, 25, Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4. Spring 
term. 

Text: Sedgwick's Principles of Sanitary Science. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 79 



GEOGRAFY 



• 



COURSE ONE 
Elementary Physiografy 

The earth as a planet, the atmosfere, the ocean, the land. 
Field lessons, excursions, wether observations, simple experiments, 
study of topografic maps, etc., give concreteness to the work. 

This course or its equivalent is prerequisit to all other courses 
in the department. 

Texts : Salisbury's Modern Geografy, Physiografy Note-Book, 
Four Pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE TWO 

Human Geografy 

Influence of natural conditions on the development of the 
occupations of man. Topografy and climatic conditions of the 
earth; vegetation zones as determind by natural conditions; re- 
lation to human actitvity. Typical regions studied; general ap- 
plication to all regions of similar conditions. The course deals 
mainly with those topics given under the topical outline for the 
study of a continent in the fifth and seventh years of the State 
Course of Study. 

For students following the two-year or three-year program. 

Texts : Herbertson's Man and His Work; Bartholomew's Eco- 
nomic Atlas. Four pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 
(6 weeks.) 

COURSE THREE 

General Geografy of the World 

Covers essentially the same ground as Course 2, with a larger 
selection of typical regions and more extensiv library reading. 
Texts: Same as Course 2. (12 weeks.) 

COURSE FOUR 

Geografy of North America 

Introductory study of the continent as a whole: Detaild 
study of the United States by physiografic and industrial re- 
gions; briefer study of other countries of North America. Nat- 



80 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ural conditions as influencing industrial development considerd 
thruout the course. Extensiv library reading required. Deals 
with topics of State Course of Study pertaining to North America 
in the fifth and sixth years. 

Texts : Four pamftets on Important Topics in Geografy. Tarr 
and McMurry's New Complete Geografy, Second Book. Bartholo- 
mew's Economic Atlas. 

Courses 4, 5, or 6 may be chosen by students to complete the 
work of geografy in any of the regular programs. 

COURSE FIVE 

Primary Geografy 

An examination of the course of study for all grades, with 

especial attention to subject matter and method for third, fourth, 

and fifth grades; local field lessons and observation of lessons in 

training school. 

Texts : Dodge's The Teaching of Geografy in the Elementary 
Schools; State Course of Study; Course of Studg in Training School; 
Four Pamftets on Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE SIX 
Commercial Geografy 
Conditions both natural and artificial favoring commercial 
development; Study centerd about commodities of wide use, as 
food, clothing, shelter, etc. Commodities of importance in the 
United States given fullest treatment. Most important com- 
modities of each continent considerd. Causal idea in geografy 
prominent thruout course. Extensiv library reading required. 
Deals with industrial topics of the fifth, seventh, and eighth years 
of State Course of Study. 

Texts: Smith's Industrial and Commercial Geografy, Bar- 
tholomew's Economic Atlas. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Geografy of South America 
This course develops a method of continental study as re- 
quired in seventh and eighth years' work of the State Course of 
Study. South America servs admirably as a type continent to 
work out a geografic sequence, — position, surface, climate, life, 
industry, and commerce. A regional study of South America is 
made on the basis of physiografic division. 

Texts: Bowman's South America; Bartholomew's Economic 
Atlas. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Geografy of the Eastern Continents 
A study of Asia, Africa, and Australia, covering the eighth 
year's work of the State Course of Study. 
Text: Mill's International Geografy. 



Illinois State Normal University 81 

COUNTRY SCHOOL COURSES 

COURSE NINE 
Elementary Physical Geografy 

This is similar to Course 1, but the work will be adapted to 
16 teaching of Fourth Year Geografy as outlined in the State 
curse of Study. 

Texts: Salisbury's Modern Geografy; Four Pamfiets on Im- 
ortant Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE TEN 

Geografy Method for Country School 

A thoro analysis of the State Course of Study; material and 
lethods for developing the State Course; emfasis to be placed 
n the portions of the course to be taught during the next school 
ear fall term. 

Texts: Tarr and McMurry's New Second Book; Four Pam- 
ets on Important Topics in Geografy; Bartholomew's Atlas; 
[erbertson's Man and His Work, 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

Senior college courses in geografy ar open to students who 
lav completed the required work of the previous courses, or any 
,f these courses may be sustituted for Courses 4, 5, 6, or 7, by 
enior normal-school students. Courses 11, 12, 13, will be taught 
n 1916-17; Courses 14, 15, 16 in 1917-18. 

COURSE ELEVEN 
Geografy of Europe 

An introductory study of Eurasia as a land mass, with more 
letaild consideration of the physiografy, climate, vegetation, and 
people of Europe. A regional study of the continent, dealing 
Niih leading countries, their relation to each other, to the United 
States, and to the rest of the world. Special topics for library 
itudy. 

Texts: The Continent of Europe, Lyde; Longmans Atlas. 

COURSE TWELV 

Method in Geografy 

Scope of geografy as a school study; the basis of a course 
af study, its orderly development and methods of presentation 



82 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

in the grades and the high school. Detaild work on a limited 
portion of the course of study by each member of class; prepara- 
tion of reference lists for collateral reading; observation in train- 
ing department. For superintendents, principals, and special teach- 
ers of geografy. 

Texts: McMurry's Special Method in Geografy; State Course 
of Study; Course of Study in Training School; Four Pamflets on 
Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Ad VAN ST Physiografy 

Life history of land forms; study and construction of maps 
and models; field lessons, meteorology; study and construction 
of wether maps; oceanografy. Chief topics of Course 1 treated 
from the standpoint of the teacher, with much more library ref- 
erence reading, field and laboratory work. For high-school teach- 
ers. 

Text: Salisbury's P/ii/5togra/i/. Advanst Course. (12 weeks. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 
General Geology 

A study of geologic processes usually treated in physical 
geografy, followd by historical geology which deals with the more 
important events of geological history. 

Text: Chamberlain and Salisbury's Introductory Geology. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Climatology . 

A study of the atmosfere, its general circulation, cyclonic 
storms, etc.; climate as a geografical factor; its influence on man 
and the industries. 

Text: Milham's Meteorology. 

COURSE SIXTEEN 
Conservation of Natural Resources 

A study of the natural resources of the United States and 
the world; their use and their conservation; the conservation 
movement in the United States, with especial reference to soil, 
forests, minerals, water. 

Text: Van Hise's The Conservation of Natural Resources in 
the United States. 



Illinois State Normal University 83 



HISTORY 



It 



COURSE TWO 
The Founding of the American Nation 



This course is for graduates of the eighth grade entering the 
iountry-school program of the Normal School and for those in- 
3nding to prepare for entrance into the Teachers College. The 
eriod studied extends from the discovery of America to the fall 
f the Federalist party in 1800. Attention is given to the study 
f Illinois history from the national point of view in accordance 
^ith the recommendations of the Illinois State Course of Study. 
Ipper grade text-books in general use in Illinois ar examind and 
lethods of using them are discust. The work is supplemented 
hruout with library work. 

Text: Forman's Advanced History. 

COURSE THREE 
The Growth of the American State 

This course continues the work of Course 2, bringing the 
karrativ down to the present. Relativly more time is spent on the 
iiistory of our own state than in Course 2. 

Text: Forman's Advanced History. 

COURSE FOUR 

This course is intended for students who have studied U. S. 
listory in the high school or who hav taught the subject. The 
iourse consists of a summary of European conditions during the 
.5th and 16th centuries of our colonial and revolutionary eras, 
ollowd by a study of social, industrial, and political development 
luring our national period to the Civil War. 

Text: A Short History of the United States, Bassett. 

COURSE FIVE 

Recent American History 

I An intensiv study of our development since the Civil War. 
' Irhe work of Reconstruction, followd by an analysis of our social, 
ndustrial, and political development since 1876. 

Text: A Short History of the United States Bassett. 

A large number of different courses in history and civics ar taught because of the 
varying needs of students. Car- should be taken to see that students enter the right class. 



84 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SIX 
History Method in Lower Grades 
This course is to give the student an understanding of the 
meaning of history and its purposes in the grades. The State 
Course of Study and the course in the training school furnish 
the materials for the course. After a theoretical consideration 
of method in history, class exercizes in history in the training 
school furnish the basis for discussions and unifications of the 
work of the course. 

COURSE SEVEN 
History Method for High Schools 
This course is a study of the materials of history and the 
forms in which they ar recorded; the six chief lines of humaa 
activity, the social, industrial, political, religious, educational, 
and ethical; the scope of history in the high school, its aims, 
methods of study and recitation. Emfasis will be laid upon the 
selection and organization of materials of value to the history 
teacher in secondary schools. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Ancient History 

This course is intended for juniors of the five and four-year 
programs. It carries the student from the earliest historical period 
to the invasions of the Roman Empire. It shows the contri- 
bution made by each of the early peoples toward the civiliza- 
tion of the race. Particular attention is given to the ancient 
republics and to the introduction of Christianity. Fall and sum- 
mer terms. 

Text : The Ancient World, West. 

COURSE NINE 
Medieval History 
This course is intended for the students who hav had An- 
cient History. The origin and development of institutions and 
the progress of the people receiv the greater emfasis. It is the 
study of European development from the migrations to the Re- 
naissance. Winter and summer terms. 

Text: History of Western Europe, Robinson. 

COURSE TEN 
Modern European History 
This is a study of the expansion of Europe in the 16th cen- 
tury, the religious and political revolutions, and the unifica- 
tion of Italy and Germany. Emfasis is laid upon a view of pres- 
ent day conditions, problems, and tendencies in Europe, as well 
as upon the relations of Europe with America. Spring and sum- 
mer terms. 

Text : History of Western Europe, Robinson. 



Illinois State Normal University 85 

COURSE ELEVEN 
English History 

This course develops the narrativ of English History from 
le beginning of the Tudor period to the present. The text is 
bplemented by extensiv library work on the more important 
nes of development. The influence of English History upon 
lat of America; England as a sea power and her part as an 
?ent of civilization; the industrial revolution; and the rise of 
3mocracy receiv especial attention. 

Text: Short History of England, Cheney. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
American History 
This course is an intensiv study of the colonial and revo- 
itionary periods of American history. It is intended for pros- 
ectiv high-school teachers of history, politics, and social science. 
Imfasis is laid upon the economic, social, and political conditions 
f colonial life; upon the growth of self government and the 
nes of development that made separation from England necessary. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

I This is similar in method to Course 13 and covers the period 
>om 1783 to the Civil War. Federalist supremacy; the Jefferson- 

m system; rise of national spirit; growth and influence of the 
Vest, development of transportation facilities; parties and party 
overnment, slavery, abolition, and Civil War. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

This is a study of Reconstruction, with the resulting southern 
iroblems; growth of municipalities; commercial expansion; rise 
If corporations, and other recent problems. Emfasis is laid upon 
ecent changes and lines of development. 

Courses 13, 14, and 15 will be given in 1917-18 and in alternate 
ears thereafter. 

I I COURSE SIXTEEN 
t European History 

I This course, as well as Courses 17 and 18, ar intended for 
ipecial students in history and prospectiv social science teachers, 
fhey are similar in method to Courses 13, 14, and 15. The end 
!)f the political and social conditions of the so-cald Middle Ages is 
^)riefly considerd, followd by a study of the Renaissance with its 
nultiplicity of interests; the Protestant Reformation, its causes, 
jpred into different countries and resulting religious wars; the 
Peace of Westphalia, with a review of economic, social and 
political conditions at the time. 



L 



86 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SEVENTEEN 

European History 1648-1815 

The chief subjects considerd ar: The era of absolutism, with 
its dynastic wars — Colonization — Industrial Revolution, French 
Revolution and Napoleonic periods — Congress of Vienna, 1815. 

COURSE EIGHTEEN 
European History 1815-1900 

Review of economic and social conditions — Metternich's sys- 
tem — revolt, and growth of liberal ideals, France under Napoleon 
III.; unification of Italy and Germany; Russia and the Balkans; 
growth of democracy; situation at the opening of the twentieth 
century. 

Texts used in Courses 16 to 18 ar Robinson and Beard's The 
Development of Modern Europe (2 vols.), and the accompanying 
Readings (2 vols.) 

Given in 1916-17, and in alternate years thereafter. 

CIVICS 

COURSE ONE 

Elementary Civics 

This course is for beginners who hav neither studied civics in 
the high school nor had any experience in teaching it, and desire 
to prepare for a county elementary certificate. An effort is made 
to gain an insight into the spirit, form, and functions of our gov- 
ernment. 

Text: Fovmoiii's 2' he American Republic. 

COURSE TWO 
Ad van ST Civics 

An advanst course in civics intended for students who ha"v 
had the elementary work or hav had experience as teachers of 
this subject. The origin and growth of law^s and institutions ar 
studied. The relation of our constitution to colonial charters, to 
the political experiences of the provincial era, as well as to the 
English constitution, is traced with care. 

The rights and duties of the citizen, his relation to the nation, 
to the states, and the units of local government ar considerd as 
essential topics. In placing these mutual relations the machinery 
of the government is studied, as ar the effects of its workings as 
seen in history. Party machinery for nominating and for carrying 
out its policies is studied. Fall and summer terms. 

Texts: Civil Government in the United States, Fiske; Ad- 
vanced Civics, Forman. 



Illinois State Normal University 87 

COURSE THREE 
Political Science 

This course deals with the nature, scope, and methods of 
olitical science; the nature, functions, and sfere of the state; 
lationality, citizenship, its rights and duties; constitutions, their 
ources and kinds; the distribution of -government powers. 

Text: Introduction to Political Science, Garner. Fall term. 

COURSE FOUR 
Political Parties \nd Party Machinery 

A study of the history of political parties in the United States 
,nd the development of party machinery. The course begins 
i/iih the organization of the Federalist and Republican parties 
mder the leadership of Hamilton and Jefferson in Washington's 
dministration and traces those parties to their dissolution in 
820-24. The rise and fall of the Congressional nominating 
aucus, together with the development of the legislativ caucus 
overing the same period, will be studied in connection with the 
dstory of the Federalist and Republican parties. The rise of the 
Vhig and Democratic parties as successors to the Federalist and 
lepublican parties will next be considerd, together with the origin 
md history of the National Nominating Convention. The organ- 
zation of the Republican party of today and the history of that 
)arty, together with that of the Democratic party, to the present 
ime. The rise of the Primary system toward a National Primary 
or nominating President and Vice-President. The initiativ, 
•eferendum, and recall platforms, the party boss and his system, 
ilong with prominent party leaders as Jefferson, Hamilton, DeWitt 
Clinton, Martin Van Buren, Thurlow Weed, Robert Toombs, Jef- 
erson Davis, Thaddeus Stevens and Marcus Hanna. Winter term. 

Texts: Parties and Party Machinery, Macy; History of the 
^^residency, Stanwood. 

COURSE FIVE 
Municipal Government 

A study of the rapid growth of cities in the United States 
md how they ar governd. The field of city government as dis- 
bnguisht from state and national government. Problems of city 
government, as sanitation, transportation, lighting, garbage, parks, 
police, etc., will be considerd in detail. The city boss and his 
systems; elections and nominating machinery. The Mayor-Alder- 
manic system and the rise and extension of the Commission form 
of city government. Spring term. 

Text: Goodnow's City Government in the United States. 



88 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

COURSE ONE 
Elementary Economics 

This course, for Section P, aims to assemble the industria 
facts alredy known to the students, to supplement these thru di- 
rect observation, to organize and systematize all with the help ol 
a minimum of theory, and to introduce the student to economic 
questions of the day. 

Texts : Ely and Wicker's Elementary Economics. Winter 
term. 

COURSE TWO 

Economics 

In the belief that the social environment is largely economic 
and that to understand it so as to get the most out of life or so as 
to help solv the complex problems that menace democracy some 
knowledge of economics is necessary, this course has been pro- 
gramd for all seniors, whether they ar looking towards teaching 
in the grades or in the high school. 

It affords, for an introductory course, a fairly comprehensiv 
survey of economic theory and of economic problems. Seager's 
Principles of Economics is the text and is coverd in the twel\ 
weeks by the students working up for themselvs portions of the 
text along with appropriate supplementary readings, while the 
recitation periods ar devoted to the more difficult chapters. Id 
the development of the theory constant use is made of concrete 
problems. The course is taught every regular term and the first 
summer term. 

COURSE THREE 
Advanst Economics 3 

One or more great economic topics and the related problems ol 
the day ar studied. As it is usually best to take topics of greatest 
public interest at the time when the course is given, it is not 
practicable to announce these in advance. The work for the winter 
of 1914-15 was a study of contemporary economic politics, in- 
volving the tariff, revenue, trust, and money and banking legisla- 
tion of the 63rd Congress. This course will be taught in the winter 
of 1916-17, alternating with Advanst Economics 4, which will be 
given in 1917-18. Prerequisit, Economics 2. 

COURSE FOUR 

Advanst Economics 4 

This course will be taught in the winter of 1917-18 and is a 
course similar to and alternating with Advanst Economics 3, but 
devoted to different topics and problems. Prerequisit, Economics 2. 



Illinois State Normal University 89 

COURSE FIVE 
I Sociology 

I This course includes a discussion of the scope of sociology 
id of the causes that affect the life of society; of the nature of 
Dciety, of its constituent elements and of the relation between 
lie individual and society, of social evolution from consanguin or- 
inization thru the era of the state to internationalism. The 
lore practical fases of the subject receiv attention. The facts 
ertaining to population form the basis for a discussion of prob- 
sms of immigration, of rural and city life. Social questions 
mnected with the family organization, or arising from our sys- 
;m of labor, or from the unequal distribution of welth, and in 
larticular those of special interest to teachers — such as the state's 
•eatment of dependents, defectivs, and delinquents— receiv atten- 
on. 

Taught every spring and first summer term and in the fall 
f 1917 and alternate years thereafter. 

Only students who hav completed Economics 2 or an equivalent 
Durse may be admitted to the fall term classes. 

Text: Hayes's Introduction to the Study of Sociology. 

COURSE SIX 

Social Problems 

This course will be taught in the fall 1916 and alternate 
ars thereafter. It includes the briefest possible preliminary 
iirvey of sociological theory and a careful study of several great 
roblems that ar sociological rather than economic — such as immi- 
ration, crime, poverty and pauperism. Ellwood's Sociology and 
ocial Problems affords an outline for the term's work, but much 
brary reading is required. Prerequisit, Economics 2. 

COURSE SEVEN 
American Industrial History 

A text-book (Bogart's), constructed on the chronological 
Ian, is used, but the lines of development ar kept distinct and 
ontinuous thruout the course. Course Seven alternates with 
iourse Eight and will be taught in the spring term, 1918. Prere- 
uisit. Economics 2. 

COURSE EIGHT 
English Industrial History 

I This course is similar to and taught alternately with Course 
'lleven. Taught in the spring term of 1917, etc. Prerequisit, Eco- 

lomics 2. 

Texts: Cheney's Industrial and Social History of England; 

layes's British Social Politics. 



90 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



LITERATURE 



COURSE ONE 
Poetry and the Novel 

Classroom study of the minor epic in Mathew Arnold's Sohrab 
and Rustum, and the novel in George Eliot's Silas Marner. Out- 
side of the class a further study is made of narrativ verse, usually 
Tennyson's Princess or The Idylls of the King, and of the novel in 
one of Scott's or Hawthorne's novels. This is followd by careful 
class discussion, in which both the substance and the artistic 
structure and value of these masterpieces ar considerd. In 1916-17 
The Idylls of the King and Old Mortality. Winter and summer 
terms. 

Texts: Sohrab and Rustum, Riverside Literature Series. 
Silas Marner, Applton's. The Princess, Rolfe's. Idylls of the King, 
Rolfe's. 

COURSE TWO 

Poetry, Essays or Speeches, and the Novel 
Lyric and narrativ verse in the volume of selections from 
Wordsworth, made by Mathew Arnold, and two books of the great 
epic Paradise Lost form the basis of the classroom work. The out- 
side work consists of reading from Emerson's Essays, First Series, 
and selected essays from Laynh's Essays of Elia, or Arnold's Culture 
and Anarchy, or Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, speeches by Burke or 
Webster, and a novel by one of the greater novelists. This outside 
reading is followd by careful class discussion. In 1916-17 Web- 
ster's Reply to Hayne, Lincoln's Inaugurals, and Thackeray's Pen- 
dennis. 

COURSE THREE 

Shakspere 

Two plays ar studied in detail in class; in 1916-17, Macbeth 
and Hamlet. Outside of the class three more plays by Shakspere 
or Marlowe, ar red and then carefully discust in class. In 1916-17 
Twelfth Night, Henry IV. Part One, and Othello. 

Some attention is given to the Elizabethan theaters, the cir- 
cumstances under which they came into existence, and the condi- 
tions under which plays were presented in them. The chief pur- 
pose of the course, however, is to give an understanding of the 
drama, its essential nature, its structure, its limitations, and its 
powers, and, more defmitly still, to make students intelligent read- 
ers of Shakspere themselvs, and intelligent guides to others. Win- 
ter, spring, and summer terms. 

Texts: Shakspere, Arden, Rolfe's, Hudson's, or Porter's First 
Folio Edition. 



Illinois State Normal University 91 

COURSE FOUR 

Literature Method 

This is a comprehensiv course in method and the conditions 
hat determin method. It includes a study of the essential nature 
f literature; its right to a place in the curriculum; its proper 
unction there; the various facts and conditions to be considerd in 
etermining a course of study in literature from the first primary 
the last high-school year; and of the problems that arise in the 
ctual teaching in the elementary and the high school. This work 
s based on the text Literature and Life in School, and requires a 
ood deal of library work. In the fall term the course gives more 
areful attention to the primary grades, in the winter to the high 
cbool, in the spring to the upper grades. All terms. 

TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE FIVE 
Literary Types 

This should be the first course in literature taken by students 
if the Teachers College. It includes a study of lyric and narrativ 
'erse, of the essay, the novel, and the drama. Its purpose is to 
nake clear what kind of knowledge of these literary types and 
vhat sympathetic and intelligent mastery of individual works in 
he several type forms ar necessary for one who would teach 
hem intelligently. It servs as an introduction to the more com- 
)rehensiv course in method and to the more advanst special 
lourses in these several fields of literature. Fall and summer 
arms. 

Text: Johnson's Forms of English Poetry. 

COURSE SIX 

English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century 

Page's British Poets of the Nineteenth Century is used as a 
-ext. Study is made of the characteristic themes dwelt upon by 
.he poets red, of their characteristic modes of thinking and feeling, 
)f their favorit verse forms and their mastery of these forms, and 
)f their relations to their times and their significance in the social 
md intellectual and artistic life of the nineteenth century. Fall 
md summer terms. 

COURSE SEVEN 
History of Literature 
This course covers the history of English literature down to 
ihe nineteenth century. 

Text: A History of English Literature, howeit Winter term. 



92 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE EIGHT 

History of English Literature Since 1800 and of 

American Literature 

The scope of the course is indicated by its title. 
Text: Same as in 8A. Spring term. 

COURSE NINE 

College Course in Shakspere 

For this course the student should hav a complete editi( 
of Shakspere and MacCracken, Pierce, and Durham's Introductu 
to Shakspere. From fifteen to twenty plays ar studied, includii 
comedies, histories, and tragedies from Shakspere's earliest woi 
to his latest. Questions of sources, time of composition, plottin 
characterization, motivation, language, technique, and dramat 
power ar discust with reference to the plays. The Elizabeth? 
stage and its influence on the structure and mode of presentati( 
of plays ar considerd. Pedagogical questions ar discust inciden 
ally. Spring term. 

COURSE TEN 

American Poetry 

This is a course in rapid reading of the American poets fro 
Bryant to Moody and Peabody. While most attention is giv( 
to the work of Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whittle 
Holmes, Lowell, Whitman, and Lanier, who ar included in tl 
text used, the course is ment also to give some knowledge of sue 
later or minor poets as Aldrich, Sill, Guiney, Peabody, Mood 
Tucker, Carman, Hovey, and Gilder. The text is Page's Chi 
American Poets, Fall term 1917 and alternate years thereafter. 

COURSE ELEVEN 
English Drama 

This is the study of the development of the drama fro 
the miracle plays down to the closing of the theaters by Parlii 
ment. It requires a rapid reading of many Elizabethan plaj 
chosen from Lyly, Kyd, Greene, Marlowe, Shakspere, Dekke 
Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Heywood, Middleton, Ford, Wet 
ster, and Massinger. It includes a study of the relation of tl 
drama and the theater to the Elizabethan and Jacobean world 
It should give the student the power to see Shakspere in a tru( 
perspectiv. 

The text used is Neilson's Chief Elizabethan Dramatists, bi 
a great deal of library work is required on periods not coverd b 
this. Winter term 1917-18 and alternate years thereafter. 



) 



Illinois State Normal University 93 

COURSE TWELV 

The English Novel 

With but slight consideration of the literary forms that 
inally made the novel possible, this course procedes from Rich- 
ards on thru Fielding, Smollet, Sterne, Goldsmith, Fanny Bur- 
ley, Miss Edgeworth, Scott, Jane Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, 
Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, TroUope, George Meredith, Haw- 
horne, Mrs. Stowe, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, and Howells. 
t givs some consideration to such typical contemporary English 
md American writers as Bennett, Galsworthy, Nicholson, Harri- 
lon, and Wharton. Cross's Development of the English Novel is 
ise'd as a guide in some mesure, but the library is the main de- 
pendence for material. Spring term, 1918 and summer terms. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 

English Poetry 

With Manly's English Poetry as text, this course is ment to 
^ive some personal knowledge of the tresures of English poetry, 
yric and narrativ, from Chaucer to Wordsworth. It is a study 
)f both substance and form of the themes that most ardently 
nterested the English people from time to time in their social 
md political development, and of the artistic forms borrowd 
''rem others or created by themselvs as means of expression. Fall 
,erm 1916 and summer terms. 



COURSE FOURTEEN 

Browning 

For this course the student should hav either Macmillian's 
)r Houghton Mifflin's one-volume edition of Browning's works, 
t includes a study of the dramatic monolog as developt by 
Browning and of many of his best poems in this form, of his 
,5hief lyrics and narrativs, of Pippa Passes, Balanstion's Adven- 
ture, In a Balcony, and The Ring and the Book. Winter term 
1916-17, summer terms. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Nineteenth Century Prose 

This covers the most important representativ English and 
American prose writers of the nineteenth century. It gives some 
iicquaintance with the thought and style especially of Lamb, De- 
3uincey, Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Emerson, Holmes, Lowell, 
jrhoreau, and their significance. Some reading is assignd also in 
Pater, Morley, Macaulay, Huxley, Lincoln, and Repplier. Spring 
.erm 1917 and summer terms. 



94 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE 

Aim: 1. To give the student the essential facts of the sul 
ject. 

2. To prepare him to express these facts in as simple a W8 
as is consistent with accuracy. 

3. To show him that topics may be presented in such a 
order that but one difficulty will be met at a time, and that thi 
when masterd, will prepare the way for others; to show also thj 
such an order makes it possible to acquire nice discriminatic 
from the first, and that power to make fine distinctions is one ( 
the chief values of the subject. 

4. To enable him to apply in a practical way the theoi 
that because of the analytical nature of our language the thougl 
element must predominate over the form element in the stuc 
of its grammar. 

Topics: Part I. The Sentence. The simple sentence wit 
its essential elements is first considerd; then element after elemei 
is added until all ordinary English construction has been studie< 
The parts of speech ar defined as the development of the sentem 
makes their introduction necessary, but only such classification 
made as is based on use. 

Part II. Parts of Speech. Classification, summary of use 
inflection. Text-Book : Gowdy. 

The subject as outlined above is given at three different ratt 
of speed: 

Course One (12 weeks) for high-school graduates. 

Courses Two and Three (18 weeks) for Section L. 

Courses Four and Five (24 weeks) for Sections M, N, and i 

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

A brief course showing the development of English idiom 
and the chief phenomena of grammatical and orthografic chang 

It discusses the relation of English to other languages, tl 
development of the standard speech, and the growth of the Englij 
vocabulary, with special emfasis upon the nativ element. 

Text: History of the English Language, Emerson. 

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC 

People compose whenever they speak or write their ow 
thought. If the composition is poor, it is usually because tt 
thinking is ill-orderd. Every teacher w^ho insists upon logic: 
thinking and clear statement is a teacher of composition. Whi 
it is true that the forms of composition may be discust ac 
standards determind in a class dealing with the forms of discours 
it is found, as in spelling or pronunciation, that correct habits i 
establisht only when all teachers unite to see that correct forms £ 



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Illinois State Normal University 95 



ised at all times. The best form is that which best fits the content. 
The best practis in composition is not in miscellaneous "exercizes" 
vith no purpose or value outside of practis. It is obtaind rather 
n writing and speaking matter that would need to be written and 
'ipoken even if there were no class in composition. 
[ I The work in Nature Study and Elementary Physics consists 
' largely of observation. To give defmitness to the observations, 
ind to make just comparisons possible, these observations must 
')e recorded. Similarly the results of observations and compari- 
sons need to be stated in organized form. 

For the reasons stated above, instruction and practis in ele- 
nentary composition needed by first-year students is given in 
'onnection with the elementary science. Besides this instruction 
,here ar offerd to students the following courses: 

COURSE ONE 
Composition 
An elementary course based on Huntington's Composition, 
md Woolley's Handbook of Composition; required of students in 
he preparatory program and recommended to others who lack 
iarly training in composition. Fall term. 

COURSE TWO 

Rhetoric 
This is a practical course in the science of rhetoric and art 
)f composition. Two papers a week ar written and criticized. 
Lmfasis is laid on the mechanics of Composition — punctuation, 
ipelling, and paragrafiing. The study of letters and letter-writ- 
ng is an important part of the course. Scott and Denney's Com- 
losition — Rhetoric is the text. 

COURSE THREE 
Science of Discourse 
1 1 This is an advanst course based on Barrett Wendell's English 
'Composition and Herbert Spencer's Philosophy of Style. 

Two weekly themes ar required. The criticism and discussion 
)f these occupy two periods of each week. The best themes ar 
•eservd for publication in the "Vidette." 

For admission to Course 3 students should hav the prepara- 
ion stated on page 17. Lacking this they take Courses 1 and 2 
n rhetoric and at least two courses in literature. 

COURSE FOUR 
Special English 
An elementary course in composition offerd for those who 
/jir deficient. Huntington's Elements of English Composition 
is used as a text. No credit. 



96 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ORTHOGRAFY 

The purpose of this course and of the course in spelling is t 
prepare students to teach the orthografy outlined for the sevent 
and eighth years in the Illinois State Course of Study. It con 
sists mainly of word-analysis and drill in marking diacriticall 
and pronouncing five hundred or more words in common us 
which ar frequently mispronounst; such as, address, alternat( 
apparatus, bouquet, comparable, def, extol, genuin, governmen 
idea, and a great deal of drill in the use of the dictionary. I 
the analysis of words, the meaning of the most frequently re 
curring roots, prefixes, and sufiixes ar lernd. The three rule 
of spelling given in the Illinois State Course of Study ar lern 
and applied, and at least one week is given to simplified spelling 

This course is not included in the two-year program. In th 
three-year program it is a six weeks' course; in the four-yea 
program it is a twelv weeks' course. All terms. 

SPELLING (5 Weeks, or Longer if Necessary) 

All students, including those admitted to Section F, ar offer 
an examination in spelling on the sixth and eleventh Fridays c 
each term. Those who show by such examination the ability t 
spell ninety out of one hundred familiar words, such as los^ 
led, busy, until, separate, reference, occurd, notable, ridiculoui 
accommodate, recommend, ar excused from further work in spell 
ing. Those who do not pass the examination ar required to tak 
a course of six weeks, or longer if necessary, and take it the follow 
ing term. Due attention is given to the simplified forms recom 
mended by the Simplified Spelling Board and authorized by th 
New Standard and the New International dictionaries. 

No student is recommended for a teachers' certificate or fo 
a position to teach or for a diploma until he has carried spelling. 



PENMANSHIP 

WRITING DRILL. (6 Weeks, or Longer if Necessary) 



The object of this course is to enable students to improv 
their writing if it is manifestly illegible or in bad form. It in 
eludes blackboard drill in movement exercizes, as outlined in th 
Illinois State Course of Study, with musical accompaniment t 
secure smoothness and harmony of movements. It is a require 
subject for those whose writing is distinctly poor. 



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Illinois State Normal University 97 

READING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

COURSE ONE 
Elementary Reading 
This is an elementary course designd for those students who 
hav had little experience in oral reading. Special emfasis is laid 
upon assimilating the thought and then presenting it clearly. 
Phillips' Natural Drills in Expression. 

COURSE TWO 

The first consideration in this course is an understanding of 
the spirit of literature, and that literary appreciation must pre- 
cede vocal expression. Then the various essentials of interpre- 
tativ readings ar studied; the group as the unit in the process of 
thought-getting, emotional values, succession of ideas, atmosfere, 
climax, tone-color, central idea, contrasts, rhythm. A grasp of 
the spirit of literature and the technique of the printed page 
leads to daily drills in vocal expression. Finally, thruout the 
course reading aloud is made the mesure and test of the student's 
grasp of the absolute life of literature. 

Texts : Drill Book in Dictionary Work; Metcalf and DeGarmo. 
Classics for Vocal Expression; Curry. 



I COURSE THREE 

The Reading of Poetry 
The primary purpose of this course is to show what poetry 
is and to train the student in rendering it orally. It deals with 
various examples of poetic art. 1. Intellectual, imaginativ, and 
emotional aspects of literature. 2. The elements of lyric, epic, 
and dramatic poetry. 3. Rhythm, rime, alliteration, assonance, 
tone-color. 4. Analysis as a preparation for oral expression. 

Texts: English Poetry, Its Principles and Progress, Gayley 
jand Young. Merchant of Venice. 



COURSE FOUR 

The same as Course Three with the addition of a study of 
phonics. 

COURSE FIVE 
How TO Teach Reading 
A. — Primary Reading, Grades I.-IV. 
This is a course that discusses the various problems that 
arise in teaching reading in the public school. Observation lessons 
by the critic teachers run parallel with classroom work. Teach- 
ers expecting to teach in the primary grades should take Division 
A of this course and follow it with Story-Telling. 

Text: Pedagogy and Psychology of Reading, Huey. 



98 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

B.— Grades Y.-VIII. 

This particular division will study the problems that arise 
in the intermediate and upper grades. 

Text: How to Teach Reading in the Public Schools Clark. 

COURSE SIX 
The Art of Story-Telling 

This is a course designd to meet the needs of the teacher in 
the elementary grades and the high school. It quickens the imag- 
ination, develops the insight into literature, incites growth in the 
spirit of literature insted of slavish dependence on the letter of 
the selection. It causes the story teller to see clearly and think 
deeply and present the great points of the story. The stories 
studied will be the world stories that hav influenst the race. They 
will be taken up in sequence and their relation to the spiritual 
development of the race will be shown. Winter, spring, and sum- 
mer terms. 

Text: Stories and Story-Telling, Bailey. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Platform Reading 

An advanst course pland especially for those who wish to 
enter contests and for all who feel the need of skill and finish for 
appearing in public. 

The selections studied will be of the highest type of literature 
and great attention will be paid to the interpretation and deliv- 
ery. Open to students who hav completed Course 3 or Course 4. 
Electiv. Winter term. 

Text: Lessons in Vocal Expression, Chamberlain and Clark. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Extemporaneous Speaking 

The preparation and delivery of original speeches. The stu- 
dent is shown that effectiv speaking grows out of obedience to ac- 
curate laws and that it is never a matter of impulse. The impel- 
ling motivs, the factors of interestingness, the central idea, the 
ends of speech ar the chief details of this course. Naturalness 
and earnestness ar sought at all times. Subjects ar chosen from 
current topics, literature, economics, science, sociology. Special 
attention is given to the short 3, 5 and 10-minute speech for a 
definit occasion, such as institute, convention, lodge, after-dinner, 
club, or church. 

Text: Effectiv Speaking, Phillips. 



Illinois State Normal University 99 

COURSE NINE 
Argument 



Sbriefs. This work leads up to oral debates. Here special stress 
is laid on team work and oral delivery. Fall term. 

Text: Argumentation and Debating, Foster. 

Towards the end of the fall term the speakers ar selected for 
the annual interstate debates. These with others who wish to 
make a thoro study of the question chosen continue the study of 
debating thru the winter term. 

COURSE TEN 
The Speaking Voice 

This course aims to lay the basis of a correct use of the 
speaking voice. Individual and class drills and exercises ar used 
to secure flexibility, projection, volume, support, resonance, and 
control of the tone. Especially designd to benefit the classroom 
voice. Fall term. 

Text: The Speaking Voice, Everts. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

The Analysis and Presentation of the Drama 

This course will present the drama as a living agent and by 
analysis and presentation make vivid examples of ancient and 
I modern drama. The dramatic work of the school will grow out 
\ of this course and students entering it must hav taken other 
' courses designated by the instructors. After an understanding 
i of the technique of the drama and its analysis the class will study 
' the senior play. 

COURSE TWELV 

Advanst Public Speaking 

A course for those who hav taken extemporaneous speaking. 

The various kinds of speeches ar considerd, such as lecture, 

' after-dinner speech, institute talk, commencement address, po- 

j litical speech, dedicatory address. The basis of the work is the 

larger speech on the more formal occasion than the extem- 

; poraneous speech demands. Spring term. 

Text: The Art of Public Speaking, Esenwein and Carnagey. 



100 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

LATIN 

Two forms of the undergraduate curriculum in Latin ar 
offerd : The first of four credits for students who hav alredy 
completed three years' work in Latin, the other of ten credits 
for beginners. 

Seven advanst courses (Courses 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17) 
ar offerd, all of which may be counted towards a degree. 

Graduates of approved high schools, if they hav three or four 
years' Latin, may substitute the four courses in method outlined 
below and any two advanst courses for credits in their regular 
course, as may be directed. 

Students in the longer programs may substitute Latin for 
stard subjects as shown in the programs on pp. 24, 25, 26. 

Beginners ar advized not to take up the study of Latin unless 
they propose to complete at least two years' work. 

For the first year's work in the courses for beginners one 
credit is allowd, for the second year's work two credits. 

THE FULL LATIN CURRICULUM 

The entire curriculum as provided for beginners consists of 
ten terms, numberd consecutivly as follows: 

Courses one and two, Latin Grammar and Reader. 

Courses three, four, and five. Selections from Roman History, 
Nepos, and Viri Romae and composition based thereon. Two books 
of Caesar. 

Text: Rolfe's Junior Latin Book. 

Courses six and seven, Cicero's Orations, Harper and Gallup. 

Course eight, Ovid, Kelsey. 

Courses nine and ten, Vergil's Aeneid, Frieze. 

In aim, content and method these courses ar similar to the 
Latin Method Courses described on the next page. 

LATIN METHOD COURSES 

COURSE ONE 
Method of Beginning (First Year) Latin 
Prerequisit: An academic knowledge of the usual first 
year's work. A re-examination of Latin grammar, the serch 
being in the main one for unity and harmony. Comparativ view 
of the declensions and conjugations and correlation of fonetic 
changes with fenomena that the pupil is acquainted with. Physi- 
ological explanation of fonetic changes. Introductory study of 
syntax, or of how Latin expresses the mam types of relations. 
The question is askt at every step: What is the English (or the 
German) way of expressing the same relation? Roman Pronun- 
ciation, with special care for the long vowels. Bennett's Teaching 
of Latin. Appendix of Bennett's Grammar. Fall term. 



I 



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Illinois State Normal University 10 J 

COURSE TWO 
Caesar and Cicero Method 



The first six weeks of this course ar an inductiv study of 
the Latin ways of expressing those relations that offer to beginners 
the most difficulty, the collection of all examples in Caesar of 
these constructions, and the examination of different authorities. 
Thus ar studied cwm-clauses, the gerund and gerundiv, the uses 
of the dativ, etc. 

The second six weeks' study is based upon Cicero's orations. 
It is insisted that the translation be worthy of the Latin original 
and that it be given in the class as it should be in the reading 
class. The Cicero class that is not a good rhetoric class and a 
good reading class is not a good Cicero class. Winter term. 

COURSE THREE 
Latin -English Etymology 

The work will be of an advanst character, but only two years 
of Latin ar required as a prerequisit. It may be taken for its 
cultural value by those who ar not specializing in Latin. 

This course is expected to give the student a much more last- 
ing and comprehensiv view of both the cognate and the lineal 
relationship of Latin and English than can be given incidentally 
in connection with the other Latin courses. It should be taken 
by all who expect to teach Latin. Spring term. 

COURSE FOUR 
Method in Vergil and Ovid 

Careful translation of the text and study of scansion. Much 
attention is given to mythology and to the literary and the arch- 
Bological fase of the work. Fall term. 

Students who take the Latin Method Courses above should 
take also two of the following courses : 

j COURSE ELEVEN 

f Advanst Reading. Livy. — Prerequisits: Courses 1-4 above, 
*or four years of high-school Latin. 

Gomparativ syntax of Livy and Caesar. Discussion of sec- 
ondary school problems that pertain to Latin. Taught in the 
?winter of the school year of 1917-18. Text: Lord. 

I COURSE TWELV 

\ Advanst Reading. Horace. — Prerequisit: Course 11 or 13. 
Taught in the spring of 1918. Text: Smith. 



102 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



1 



COURSE THIRTEEN 

Advanst Reading. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. — This 
course alternates, as to the years it is taught, with Course 11. 
Prerequisit: Courses 1-4 or four years of high-school Latin. 

Taught in the winter term of the school year 1916-17. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

Advanst Reading. Cicero's De Senectute. — This course altern 
nates as to the year it is given with Course 12. Spring of 1917. 
Prerequisit: either Course 11 or Course 17. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Advanst Course in Writing Latin. — A preliminary review ol 
elementary work, fbllowd by the writing of connected discours^ 
more difficult in character. Fall term every year. 



GERMAN 

First Year's Work 

Courses 1, 2 and 3, taught successivly each fall, winter, an^ 
spring term, constitute the first year's work in German. Thej 
include grammatical drill, composition, some practis in conversa- 
tion, an elementary view of English-German philology, and th< 
translation into English of 375 pages of German, including cm 
classical drama. These three courses, or two years' of high-schoc 
work, ar a prerequisit to any of the advanst courses 4-9. 

COURSE ONE : 

Elementary course; pronunciation, grammar, and easy read-^i 
ing. Mezger and Mueller's Kreuz und Iner durch Deutsche Landi 

Fall term. 

COURSE TWO 

Grammar, syntax, and reading of modern prose. Memorizin, 
of prose and verse. Kreuz und Iner durch Deutsche Lande 
Storm's Immensee, and his In St. Jurgen. German Poems fo 
Memorizing. Winter term. 

COURSE THREE 

Translation into German, grammatical drill, dictation, trans 
lation into English of Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, memorizing o 
lyrics and ballads. Clayton's Material for Oral Translation. Sprini 
term. 



I 



B TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

Prerequisits : Courses 1, 2, and 3, or two years of high-school 

I Students wishing a recommendation as to their ability to teach 
'xerman should take at least three of the courses 4-9, arranging to 
ubstitute the same for subjects regularly in their programs. 
I Students seeking a degree and selecting German as a prin- 
iipal subject, should take all the courses 4-9. 

Courses 2-9 include a thoro study of German grammar, 
oynes-Meissner, Parts I., II., and III. They include constant 
iractis in conversation and composition in connection with gram- 
aatical studies and the memorizing of German idioms, thru 
reie Reproduction and thru epitomes of, and composition exer- 
izes based upon, the texts red. As the course progresses German 
lecomes increasingly the language of the classroom. Much more 
.ttention than is usually the case is given to English-German 
thilology. During each year of advanst work, there will be a 
horo discussion of the aims, methods, and courses of high-school 
Jerman. 

COURSE FOUR 

Frey tag's Die Journalisten, Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, 
pyrics and Ballads, Hatfield. Fall term. 

COURSE FIVE 

A study of the life and works of Schiller. Die Jungfrau von 
Cleans and Marie Stuart. Wirter term. 

COURSE SIX 

j A study of the life and works of Goethe. His Egmont, his 
termann und Dorothea, and many of his lyrics will be red. Spring 
term. 



COURSE SEVEN 

Freytag's Soil und Hahen, and Eichendorff's Der Taugenichts. 
[itudy of the idioms of recent and contemporary German prose, 
hu term. 

i 

COURSE EIGHT 

Ludwig's Zwischen Eimmel und Erde. Heine's Die Hartzreise 
'ind some of his lyrics will be red. Winter term. Suderman's 
''rau Sorge is to be red outside of class. 

COURSE NINE 

Goethe's Iphigenie auf Tauris; Gore's German Science Reader; 
lOethe's Dichtung und Wafirheit to be red outside and repored 
class. Leon's Deutsche Grammatik to be used thruout the year. 



104 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

COURSE ONE 
/ This course is for beginners. 

Songs lernd thru imitation. The elements of music — ear codjJ 
cepts — deduced from the familiar songs. 

Notation — eye concepts — as it pictures the familiar musica 
elements. Sight-reading. Key and mesure signatures, and al 
forms of notation necessary to the intelligent reading of voca 
music. 

Text : Elements of Music in Song. Westhoff. 

COURSE TWO 

Sight-reading in unison, and two, three, and four-par 
harmony. Practis in chorus singing. A study of all ordinar: 
mesure forms. Written work as a further means for ear and eyi 
training. 

Text: Elements of Music in Song, Westhoff. Progressii 
Music Series, Book Two. 

A variety of musical selections in octavo form. 

COURSE THREE 
Advanst Sight Reading 

This course is for students who hav fmisht Course 2 or it 
equivalent, and who intend to teach in intermediate or gramma 
grades. 

The major, minor, and chromatic scales; intervals and chords 
modulation and key relationship. 

Text: Progressiv Music Series, Book Four. 

COURSE FOUR 
Primary Music Methods 

The complete song as a basis for the child's music educatior 
Selecting songs: (a) With reference to their use; (b)with ref 
erence to the child voice. How to teach a rote song . Develop 
ment and care of the child voice. The monotone. Observatio: 
of the simpler elements of song. Notation of familiar melodies 
Reading simple melodies. Written work. Fall and winter terms 

Practis teaching in the Model School. 

Texts: Progressiv Music Series, Books One and Two. 



Illinois State Normal University 105 

COURSE FIVE 
Methods 



I This course covers the work for grades four to eight inclusiv. 
fPrerequisit: Course four. 

Classification of the elements of music and the presentation 
3f their parts in logical succession. The problems involvd in the 
irt of reading vocal music, considerd from the teacher's point 
bf view. Tone production, and classification of voices in the 
ipper grades. Song interpretation. 

Practis teaching in the Model School. 

Text: Progressiv Music Series, Book Three. 

COURSE SIX 

High-School Music — Bibliografy of high-school music. Cho- 
[•us conducting. Organization of an orchestra; glee clubs. A 
study of the lives and works of the great composers. 

Practis teaching. 

COURSE SEVEN 

Elementary Harmony. Musical History. Music Appreciation. 
Form in Music. 

The Choral Club 

The Choral Club — a chorus of mixt voices — meets twice each 
^eek. Composition of the better class and excerpts from the 
standard cantatas, operas, and oratorios ar studied and prepared 
for public presentation. Three concerts ar given each year. 

The Glee Clubs 

Practis in part singing may be further developt in connec- 
tion with the work of the Girls' and Boys' Glee Clubs, which meet 
.wice a week for practis. 

The Orchestra 

Students who play upon orchestral instruments ar given an 
opportunity for practis in concerted playing. The orchestra 
tiolds one rehersal each week. 

The Band 

The Normal University owns fifteen instruments, upon which 
["egular lessons ar given until sufficient skill is gaind for concerted 
playing. The band and orchestra furnish music for the social 
functions of the school. 



106 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



II ART DEPARTMENT |J 

There is a growing demand for teachers who can introduce 
elementary instruction into the public schools of the state. Ir 
many respects this school affords excellent facilities for the 
training of special teachers. The kindred arts ar being rapidlj 
developt with the best equipment. The professional studies o1 
the normal school enable the students of art to lern the propei 
setting of art courses in the public-school curriculum. 

All students in the special program of Art and Design will leave 
for the use of the institution at least one example of their wort 
in sketching, painting, etc., and one of their work in the crafts. 

COURSE ONE 
Freehand Drawing. 

This course treats simply of the technique of drawing as i 
language. There is little effort to touch the art element. 

The scope, function, divisions and kinds of drawing, fore- 
shortening and convergence, and light and shade ar the subjects 

More extensiv treatments of these subjects ar offerd in course; 
four and five. 

It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected t( 
supplement this course. Minor. All terms. 

COURSE TWO 
Primary Teachers' Course 

There ar two parts; one that considers the subject for th| 
children and the other for the teacher. 

Suggestion in regard to illustrativ drawing, clay modeling" 
elementary object and nature drawing make up the first part. 

The second part includes effectiv blackboard drawing, studi 
of the pose, picture study for the lower grades, and the element; 
of the three branches of form study: construction, appearance 
and design. 

It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected t( 
supplement this course. Minor. Fall and spring. 

COURSE THREE 
Drawing for Rural Schools 
Study of objects in mass drawing that ar interesting in coloi 
and shape. 



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Illinois State Normal University 107 



n Simple suggestions in regard to convergence and foreshort- 
'ming in the appearance of objects. 

Flowers, sprays, fruits, vegetables, trees, animals in charac- 
leristic pose, and simple landscapes ar selected with a hope of 
lidding to the pupil's appreciation of the beauty in the things 
kbout him. 

I It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected to 
lupplement this course. Minor. Fall and winter. 

COURSE FOUR 
Freehand Perspegtiv 

This course is introduced by a discussion of the scope, func- 
ion, divisions, and kinds of drawing, which leads to the problem 
)f convergence and foreshortening. 

Chief problemf^: Curvd-edge objects: — Three views of the 
urcle, concentric circles. Straight-edge objects: nine typical 
positions of an object as to the observer. Study of parallel reced- 
ng edges and foreshortend faces. The problems ar studies made 
Tom local conditions and may be reset to the opportunities 
)f any other school. Two hours daily. Fall term. 

P' 

" COURSE FIVE 

y Light and Shade 

i Training in light and shade is a fundamental element in the 
jiippreciation of the beauty in objects. 

This course begins with the study of two faces of an object 
|;n flat values. Later there is a consideration of three faces, 
jurvd faces, shadows, reflected lights, composition in two and 
.hree tones, translation of color. The last part of the course ap- 
plies some of the principles discoverd in the foregoing to black- 
)oard illustrativ sketching. Minor. Winter term. 

COURSE SIX 
Cast Drawing 

This is advanst work in light and shade for students in the 
5pecial art and design course, intended to develop the skill nec- 
essary for a supervizor of drawing. 

Casts of hands, beds and the antique ar used in developing 
^he principles of foreshortening. Two hours daily. Winter term. 



108 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SEVEN 
Color 

Color-knowledge and color-training ar essential to good taste 
in the use of color. The use of color has much to do with the 
poise of the nervous system. i 

The course considers the spectrum, tints, shades, tones and 
intensities, color characteristics and a theory of color harmony. 
Simple nature studies ar used. Plants, sprays, fruits, vegetables 
and nearby views. Minor. Fall and spring terms. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Color Practis 

This is a continuation of course seven, for students in art and 
design. It includes advanst work in water color and blackboard 
practis with colord crayon. Flowers, fruits, and landscapes ar 
studied with special reference to high-school teaching and super- 
vizing. Two hours daily. Spring term. 

COURSE NINE 

Painting and Representation 

This course is a study of picture-making: how to paint, what 
to represent, and how to organize a picture. Essential points ar 
arrangement of lines, spaces, tones and values. Points in this" 
course ar similar to those in rhetoric, in language and harmony in 
music. Study of the works of master artists in regard to points 
of composition is an important means to the end. Most of the 
problems ar workt out first in a simply dry medium (charcoal). 
Later oil paints ar used. While skill with any medium cannot be 
gaind in a short time, the important side of this course can be 
appreciated by any faithful student who may be admitted to the 
advanst courses. Two hours daily. Spring term, 

COURSE TEN 
Art Appreciation 

This course consists of a careful understanding of art, archi- 
tecture, and sculpture by including a brief outline of the history 
of art as presented by painters from the Renaissance Period thru 
the modern schools. 

The Illinois Picture-Study course is carefully discust. 

The architecture of the Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, 
Saracenic, and Gothic schools is carefully analyzed and reviewd. 

The school is well supplied with a good reference library, 
pictures, lantern slides, casts, and other collections. 

Texts : DeGarmo's Art Appreciation, and Van Dyke's History 
of Art. Major. Winter term. 



^^ Illinois State Normal University 109 

IB COURSE ELEVEN 

I^P Art Organization 

m The topics: 

I ' The relativ importance of different branches of public-school 

fl art and their relation to each other; the aims and standards 

of successful work; tentativ plans and courses of study; study 

of proposed standard courses; the opportunities of the art teacher 

aside from her technical work. Major. Spring term. 



COURSE TWELV 

Principles of Design 

A study of composition developing the principles of arrange- 
ment in line, dark and light, and color thru exercizes and class 
projects, as well as discussion of good design in the larger fields 
of painting, architecture, costume, the house and various crafts. 
Design is made a living subject— the effort being to develop strong 
appreciation for beauty and some ability to execute. Minor. Fall 
and winter terms. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Primary Handwork 

A course arranged on the, basis of materials used in the ele- 
mentary grades to give opportunity for expression in construction 
work. 

The course includes practical work, compilation of illustrativ 
material and reference notes, book reviews and observations in the 
elementary grades. The course is arranged primarily for teachers 
of intermediate grades and supervizors. One hour per day. Minor 
credit. All terms. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

Industrial Art for Elementary Grades 

In this course in addition to the usual practical problems 
made and processes lernd there is assignd reading and discussion 
of related subject matter. The aim of this work in the school 
room is not only to meet the usual aims of handwork but also to 
bring the child into conscious relationship with his environment 
and show his contact with larger society. The section is limited 
to twenty-five students who hav alredy had some course in hand- 
work. The course is especially recommended for principals, 
special teachers, and those grade teachers who ar interested in 
making handwork a more vital subject in the curriculum. Two 
hours daily. Winter term. 



110 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Art Metal 

Copper and silver ar the metals used in this course. Problems 
suitable for intermediate grades and high-school classes ar made, 
using the following processes: etching, saw piercing, soldering, 
riveting, repousse, and simple work in enameling. In working 
with silver, simple jewelry making, including the setting of gems, 
is taught. 

While a sequence of practical problems is arranged for the 
students in order that all processes may be lernd, these ar so ar- 
ranged as to offer much opportunity for individuality. A knowl- 
edge of the principles of design is very desirable for those taking 
this work. Two hours daily. Fall term. 

COURSE SIXTEEN 
Pottery 

Clay, to the craftsman one of the most interesting materials, 
is the basic material for pottery problems made by modeling, flat 
and round coil bilding, and thru the use of the wheel and molds. 
The decoration of pottery is done by incise lines and areas, clay 
piercing, relief modeling, glazing and inlay. 

In addition to the series of bilt pottery problems the students 
in this course lern mold making, how to mix and apply both gloss 
and matt glazes, the construction of kilns and obtain experience 
in firing a muffle kiln. 

A course of design is of great value in connection with this 
course. 

Major. Two hours daily. Winter term. 

COURSE SEVENTEEN 
Bookbinding 

This course is not so technical that it is without vital value 
to the elementary school teacher. Interesting educational problems 
in advanst cardboard construction, stick and block printing, paper 
staining, lether tooling, coloring and modeling, and booklet making, 
as wel as craftsmanlike and more commercial methods of sewing 
on tapes, sunken cords and raised cord bindings, with pamflet 
binding, book repairing, and the rebinding of old volumes, ar 
features of this course. Major. Two hours per day. Spring term. 



Illinois State Normal University 111 



I ....... 

|H| Home Decoration 

"The art training which belongs in the elementary school is 

that training which makes for a better appreciation of esthetic 

. standards and which fmds expression in making things more 

' pleasing than they otherwise would be." James E. Russell, Dean, 

Teachers College. 

It is this spirit which helps create such courses as Costume 
Design and Home Decoration. It is here that we especially study 
Art principles in terms of things about us. The course in Home 
Decoration includes a study of the construction of the home and 
its furnisht details from the standpoint of the designers. Ref- 
erence work, practical color plates and the compiling of illustrativ 
materials occupy the two hours a day for six weeks. 
u Minor. Fall term. 

I COURSE TWENTY 

I Costume Design 

Design principles and color theory ar here studied in terms 
of dress. The course includes practical problems in representation, 
costume draping in cloth or paper, collecting and classifying dress 
in order to create an enthusiasm for proper and artistic dressing. 
■ Minor — six weeks only — two hours daily. Fall term. 
COURSE TWENTY-ONE 
Applied Design 
Design principles ar here studied in concrete form. This 
work should be preceded by the course, Theory of Design. The 
practical problems workt out will be especially suitable for the 
upper grades and high-school classes in Arts with especial effort 
at making more clear the defmit psychological principles of beauty. 
I i,; It is a course which should appeal not only to regular upper grade 
'i teachers and special teachers, but to all who desire an opportunity 
to develop a more genuin understanding and appreciation of 
beauty. Two hours daily. Spring term. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

The contribution of manual training to a complete and rounded 
education is now generally recognized, and the number of schools 
where it is given a place in the program is constantly increasing. 
The demand for teachers who can conduct the work continues 
to be far in excess of the supply. 

It is the intention to place special emfasis upon those forms 
of manual training that ar practicable under ordinary conditions 
in Illinois with reasonable expenditures for equipment and ma- 
terials, and to give comparativly little attention to those lines of 
work which ar impracticable by reason of the great expense in- 
volvd. 



112 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE ONE 
Benchwork in Wood 

The aim of this course is to teach the important tool opera- 
tions used in woodworking. It is arranged to prepare teachers 
who wish to teach benchwork in the upper grammar grades and 
high school. The work as outlined can be taught in any school 
that has an equipment of benches and hand tools. The students 
make a number of useful articles which illustrate various tool 
processes. The sharpening of tools and a study of materials used 
in woodworking will receiv due attention. Class demonstrations 
and shop-talks will be given at each new stage in the work. 

No credit will be given towards graduation for less than 120 
hours' work. Students taking the special manual training course 
must complete 240 hours' work. 

Texts: Workshop Note Book, Greene; Handwork in Wood, 
Noyes. 

COURSE TWO 

Wood-Turning and Pattern Making 

The fundamental tool processes used by the wood-turner will 
be taught by demonstration and practis at the lathe. 

A number of problems in spindle turning, cylinder turning, 
beads, fillets, cones, concave and compound curvs, etc., will be 
required before taking up face-plate work and pattern-making 
which will follow. A number of patterns will be made which 
w'll illustrate important principles, such as draft, cores, fillets, 
^shrinkage, partings, etc. 

Prerequisit, Course one. 



COURSE THREE 
Furniture Construction, Using Woodworking Machinery 

The use of woodworking machinery by advanst students in 
manual training tends to make the work far more vocational, and 
gives a training on various machines that is hard to get in a com- 
mercial shop, where the workmen lern to work on only one or ^ 
two machines. Students will be taught to use the circular and ^ 
band saws, and jointer, the surfacer, the mortis machine and the '^ 
trimmer, and to perform the hand tool work necessary for fitting 
and assembling. 

Factory methods, in which the same process is repeated till 
skill and speed ar acquired, ar followd to a large extent where 
several articles of the same kind ar wanted. 

The various methods of wood-finishing receiv considerable 
attention. 

Prerequisit, Course one. 

COURSE FOUR 

Elementary Woodwork and Carpentry 

The purpose of this course is the laying out of a course of 

study for the fifth and sixth grades, with a group of models for 

each grade, suitable for any school, no matter how small the 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 113 



equipment. Lectures ar given on the various fases of the work, 
and each student makes a course of study and a list of models. 
These ar made as original as possible. A part of the time is 
given to bench work on the models above mentiond, and to model 
lessons in teaching manual training in these lower grades. 

Instruction is given in the care and use of tools, the selection 
of the equipment, and devices for introducing the course with 
limited equipment. 

The second half of this course is designd for preparing 
teachers to teach the fundamental principles of carpentry in the 
upper grades and high school. 

I COURSE FIVE 

Organization of Manual Training 
This course is piand for persons who wish to teach manual 
training. Lesson plans, equipments and courses of study ar pre- 
pared by the students. Class demonstrations and the various 
methods of presenting a lesson ar considerd. 

In order that the student may become familiar with the lit- 
erature of manual training, the philosofy, psychology, and peda- 
gogy of manual training ar discust, and library reading and theme 
writing ar required. 

Prerequisit: Course 1. Fall term only. 

COURSE SIX 
Mechanical Drawing 

This is a course for beginners and includes working draw- 
ings, lettering, geometrical drawing, problems in projection, in- 
tersections of solids, development of surfaces, tracing and blue 
printing, and a few drawings in isometric projection. The im- 
portant principles in the theory of drawing ar taught, and much 
attention given to neat ink work, using the drafting conventions 
usually employd in the best drafting rooms. 

Students may furnish their own instruments, or rent them 
from the department. Bennett's Problems in Mechanical Drawing 
is used as a text. Two hours a day for 24 weeks, 2 credits. Taught 
every term. This course is required of all students taking the 
special manual training course. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Machine Drawing 
The special conventions of machine drawing, sketching, de- 
i tailing, assembling, etc., ar presented to the student in this 
course. Machine details, such as screws, bolts, etc., ar drawn to 
illustrate the technical conventions used by draftsmen in making 
such drawings. Free-hand sketches of machine parts ar made 
on platted paper and later machine details and assembled drawings 
ar made with the drafting instruments from the sketches. Some 
of the important parts of a gasoline engin ar drawn, and the 
strength and proportions of the part ar criticized from standard 
formulas workt out by engineers who hav made a special study 
of gasoline engin designs. 



114 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

This is an advanst course for students who wish to be pre- 
pared to teach mechanical drawing in high schools. 
Two hours per day for twelv weeks. One credit. 
Prerequisit: Mechanical Drawing. 

Text: Mechanical Drawing for High Schools. Sloan, Evans, 
and Zimmerman. 

COURSE EIGHT ^ 

Architectural Drawing 

Architectural letters, conventions, details, sections, study of 
materials, specifications and mechanical perspectiv ar taught in 
an elementary way as drawing the complete plans of a small two- 
story frame house designd by the pupil. ^ 

Prerequisit : Course 5. 

Two hours per day for twelv weeks. One credit. 

Text: Mechanical Drawing for High Schools. Sloan, Evans, 
and Zimmerman. 

COURSE NINE ? 

History of Manual Training (Minor) 

This course follows the efforts of the educational reformers 
in Europe in introducing the manual arts into the schools. The 
theories and practises of Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, von 
Fellenberg and others ar reviewd, followd by a study of the more 
successful work in modern times of Cygnaeus, Salomon, and Delia 
Vos. 

The history of the manual arts in the United States and the 
development by the various movements which hav produced edu- 
cational and vocational courses will be followd carefully. Lectures, 
reading and written work. 

Winter term. | 

COURSE TEN 
Furniture Designing and Construction 

Manual training in its best form is now to a large extent 
applied design. Craftsman furniture with pleasing lines, spaces, 
and attractiv proportions will be designd and some of the articles 
constructed and fmisht in soft artistic shades. A brief study 
of the various types of furniture will be made. 

Library reading on design, cabinet construction, and tool use 
will be required. | 

Text: Furniture Design, Crawshaw. i 

Prerequisit: Course 1. (Spring term only.) 



Illinois State Normal University 115 



m 



HOUSEHOLD ART 



HI It is the purpose of this department to provide for the ade- 
[uate training of teachers of Household Art. During the second 
^ear, students ar required to do practis teaching in the training 
chool. 

Courses 1, 2, 3, and 6 may be taken as electivs by students in 
ither departments. 

Materials ar f urnisht by students for all courses except Course 
'», for which a fee of two dollars is charged. 

COURSE ONE 
Needlework 

This course includes work in hand sewing, darning, mending, 
rochet, knitting, applied to problems suitable for elementary and 
ligh-school classes. It also includes an analysis of ornamental 
titches and their application to a piece of simple embroidery. 

A study is made of real laces and of historic types of em- 
jroidery. 

Text: Woolman's Textils. Fall term. 

COURSE TWO 
Garment Making 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of con- 
itruction. It gives practis in fundamental stitches, in handsewing, 
ki the use of the sewing machine, in the drafting of patterns, and 
n the planning, cutting, fitting, and finishing of simple garments. 

Problems in design, textils, and economics ar considerd in 
connection with the technical work. 

Winter, spring, and both summer terms. 

COURSE THREE 
Dressmaking 

This course givs practis in drafting and modeling patterns, in 
he use of commercial patterns, in the cutting, fitting and finishing 
)f a shirt waist, a tailord cotton skirt, and a somewhat elaborate 
inen or cotton dress. Problems in design, textils, and economics ar 
ionsiderd in connection with this technical work. 

Prerequisit: Course II or its equivalent. Spring and first 
mmmer term. 



116 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FOUR i 

Advanst Dressmaking 

This course givs extended practis in modeling and draping. 
It includes the making of a tailord woolen skirt and a crepe or 
chiffon waist and a silk gown, with special stress upon the proper 
handling and finishing of these different materials. 

Problems in design, textils, and economics ar considerd in 
connection with this technical work. 

Prerequisit: Course III. Fall term. 

COURSE FIVE 
The Theory of Household Art 

This course brings together the subject matter in construction 
stitches, textils, design, and economics, and organizes it as the 
basis for the selection of suitable problems to present to classes 
in elementary and high schools. Fundamental principles of teach- 
ing ar applied to lessons in household art. Comparison of courses 
of study in different schools under varying conditions of equip- 
ment and management ar made. 

Prerequisit: Two courses in Education, three courses in 
Householr Art. Winter term. 

COURSE SIX 

Millinery 

This course includes the simple processes in millinery, making 
and trimming, renovating, and remodeling hats and a study of the 
material used. 

Spring term. 

COURSE SEVEN (Electiv) 
Textils 

A study of fabrics from the standpoint of the consumer. It- 
includes the study of fibers, yarn structures, weavs, and finish-^ 
ing, and of simple physical and chemical tests for the identifica-i 
tion of mixtures and adulterations — the work to form the basis for', 
the selection of clothing and house furnishing. 

Fall term. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Rural School Course 

This course has for its aim the presentation of such work as 
can be accomplisht in rural schools : — crochet, knitting, hand and 
machine sewing, darning and mending, and the planning, cutting, 
fitting, and finishing of simple garments, including a linen or 
gingham dress. 

The time and place for sewing in the country schools will be 
discust. Winter term. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 117 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The courses in Household Science ar pland to cover the six 
terms of two regular school years and one summer term. 

They ar designd for high-school graduates, and the corre- 
lated studies required ar those considerd necessary to the prep- 
aration of a teacher of Household Science in the public schools. 

Courses 1, 2, and 3 in Household Science ar open to regular 
students who wish to take up the work as an electiv without pur- 
suing all the correlated studies. Classes in Household Science ar 
limited to eighteen members. Students ar registerd in order of 
application. 

Materials used by students ar charged at cost. 

COURSE ONE (Fall Term) 

Cookery I. 

The first course of cookery is based on a study of Food Prin- 
ciples. The composition and dietetic value of food materials and 
the processes of cookery best adapted to each class of foods are 
discust and each principle is illustrated by the preparation of sim- 
ple dishes. The practical work is designd to acquaint the student 
with all the fundamental processes of cookery and the most at- 
tractiv methods of serving. At the same time the sources, history, 
manufacture, and cost of each food is considerd. Daily, two 
periods each day. 

COURSE TWO (Winter Term) 

Cookery II. Household Management I. 

The second course in cookery provides instruction and practis 
of an advanst character and a wider application of the principles 
studied in the first course. Open to all who hav completed Course 
I in Cookery. Three lessons per week, two periods each. 

The first course in household management is a systematic 
study of the duties of the housekeeper, embracing the foundation, 
administration, and maintenance of the home. Lectures in sani- 
tation, household accounts, and domestic servis ar included in 
this course. Two lessons per week, double periods. 

COURSE THREE (Spring Term) 

Cookery III. Household Management II. 

The third course in cookery is a continuation of the work 
given in the first and second courses. It deals with the planning 
and preparation of menus, the choice and arrangement of appro- 
priate garnishing and correct methods of servis. Simple and in- 
expensiv meals ar pland to meet the requirements of a standard 
dietary and a number of these meals ar prepared and servd by the 
students. 



418 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The second course in household management is devoted to the 
study of marketing, serving, and laundry work. 

The course in marketing deals with the source, quality, price, 
and uses of foodstuffs and takes up a study of the Pure Food Laws 
and Requirements. Visits to markets ar made. 

The laundry work is based on a study of the scientific prin- 
ciples involvd in the softening of water, the preparation and ac- 
tion of soap and other clensing agents, and the methods of hand- 
ling the various fabrics in order to remove stains, disinfect and 
dense garments, and restore the natural finishes by the different 
methods of drying and ironing. The subjects ar arranged in a 
series of practical lessons according to the nature of the processes, 
and the work is carried on in a well-equipt laundry. 

Course III is open to all who hav completed Courses I and II 
in Cookery, and Course I in Household Management. 

Daily, two periods per day. 

Text: Food Products, by Henry C. Sherman. 

COURSE FOUR (Fall Term) t 

Cookery IV. I 

Institutional Cookery, Preservation of Food 

The first part of this course is devoted to the canning and 
preserving of fruits and vegetables and the making of jellies. 

The institutional work combines the skill in cookery, acquired ■ 
during the earlier courses, with the knowledge of correct methods ' 
of serving, practist in the serving course; and carries out, in 
practical manner, the planning of menus and serving of meals. ■ 
The students acquire skill in handling large quantities of material, ' 
a knowledge of correct combinations, cost of materials, time of • 
preparation for meals and labor involvd in serving a large number ■ 
of people. 

Daily, two periods per day. . 

Open to all who hav completed Courses I, II, and III in Cook- , 
ery, and Course II in Household Management. 

COURSE FIVE (Winter Term) '. 

Cookery V. 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

This course includes work in the care and feeding of infants 
and children, invalid cookery, dietetics and nutrition. 

The care and feeding of infants and children includes a study 
of the physical development of the child during the first few 
months of its life, artificial feeding, with special attention to the 
preparation of modified milk according to standard formulas, the 
selection of clothing and the general care which leads to the 
formation of correct habits. Sample diets and typical meals ar 
prepared for children of different ages. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 119 

Invalid cookery as taught includes the preparation of food 
for the sick room, special stress being laid upon the digestibility 
and mitritiv value of food. Dainty and attractiv servis is con- 
stantly emfasized. Special diets for various pathological conditions 
ar also considerd. 

A study of dietetics and nutrition involvs consideration of the 
nutritiv value, digestibility, and cost of food, the balanst ration, 
combinations of foods suitable for workers, old persons, infants, 
and invalids, and economic dietaries. 

Open to all who hav completed Courses I, II, III, and IV in 
Cookery and Courses I and II in Household Management. 

Two periods daily. 

Texts: A Laboratory Eand-Book for Dietetics, by Mary 
Swartz Rose; Chemistry of Food and Nutrition, by Henry C. Sher- 
man. 

COURSE SIX (Spring Term) 

This course includes home nursing, organization of household 
science principles, advanst cookery, and demonstrations. 

The course in home nursing is pland to enable one to render 
intelligent assistance in the sick-room. The topics coverd ar 
the furnishing, warming, and ventilating the sick-room; making 
of the bed; bathing and dressing the patient; administering food 
and medicine; lifting and care of helpless patients; preparation 
and appliances of poultises, bandaging, emergencies and diet in 
disease. 

The course in household science principles embraces a study 
of the meaning and history of the household science movement; 
equipments, courses and methods of study; and the qualifications 
necessary in a teacher of household science. 

The dishes prepared in advanst cookery ar of a more elaborate 
and complicated nature than those taken up in the earlier courses 
and more formal servis is studied. 

The latter portion of the term is given up to the demonstra- 
tions in cookery in which methods of teaching household science 
by demonstration and lecture ar studied and practist. 

Course VI is open to all who hav completed previous courses 
in Cookery and Household Management. 

Two periods daily. 

Texts : The Home Nurse's Handbook of Practical Nursing, by 
Charlotte A. Aikens. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Household Science for Country Teachers 
This is a special course of 120 hours in the study of foods, 
marketing, cooking, and serving. An effort is made to adapt the 
work to the needs of the country home, and to present methods of 
class organization and suggestions for correlation that will be of 
value to the country teacher. 
Winter term. 



I 




120 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



AGRICULTURE 



The four-year program in agriculture is designd for students 
who wish to become teachers of agriculture in township high 
schools, consolidated schools, village or city schools, in addition 
to giving the students a thoro course covering ciie entire field 
of scientific agriculture, it is well fortified with courses in physi- 
cal and biological science. These courses form an excellent foun- 
dation for the study of scientific agriculture, and equip the student 
for teaching two or more lines closely allied with each other. 

Students may take the first two years of the four-year pro- 
gram and secure the regular Normal-School Diploma, after which 
they may either teach or take the remaining two years' work and 
secure the degree of Bachelor of Education. Students ar urged 
cause of the better training and greater possibilities which the 
graduate from the four-year program obtains, 
to finish the four-year program before attempting to teach, be- 

The Normal University owns and operates an excellent farm 
of about ninety acres, lying close to the campus. The sole pur- 
pose of this farm is to demonstrate good farming methods to the 
students taking the courses in agriculture. 

The farm is primarily a dairy farm, a feature which in- 
creases the activities of the farm and adds to the student's pos- 
sibilities of practis and observation. Pure-bred horses, cattle, 
swine, and poultry ar grown. 

The farm is equipt with a modern house, barn, and other 
farm bildings, and sufficient modern machinery for a farm of its 
size. 

A five-field rotation is carried on, and a careful and thoro 
system of farm bookkeeping is foUowd, recording all data of costs 
and receipts. These records ar available to students in the course, 
enabling them to study scientific farming from the business point 
of view. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE ONE 
Elementary Stock Judging 

A study of the history, character, and form of the horse, 
cow, pig, and sheep. Emfasis is placed upon the market classes 
and grades of the various animals, upon their feeding qualities, 
and upon their capacity for the production of milk, meat, wool, 
work, and speed. Some time is given to the identification and 
scoring of the various types of poultry. A study of the pedigrees 
and show-ring achievements of the various animals is made. 

Fall term. 

Text-book: Harper's Animal Husbandry for Schools. 



Illinois State Normal University 121 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE TWO 
Elementary Stock Feeding 

A study of the classes of food nutrients and their functions 
in the animal body. Digestion, absorption, and assimilation. The 
extent and nature of the demands for food for maintenance, 
growth, fattening, milk, wool, and work. The principles involvd 
in the selection of rations. Choice of feeding stuffs and the com- 
pounding of rations. 

Winter term. 

Text-book: Harper's Animal Husbandry for Schools, 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE THREE 
Ad VAN ST Stock Feeding 

This course includes a study of the most successful and eco- 
nomical methods of feeding horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and 
poultry. Special emfasis is placed on the growth and develop- 
ment of the young animal, on feeding for the production of pork, 
milk, wool, and egs, and in the feeding of the horse for work. The 
work will be largely practical feeding tests carried on with animals 
on the University Farm, and a study of the results obtaind at the 
various experiment stations. 

Fall term. 

Text-book: Henry's Feeds and Feeding. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE FOUR 
Principles of Animal Breeding 

This course is a study of the history of the development of 
the various breeds of domesticated animals, a study of the various 
herdbooks where the important families of each breed ar traced. 
The methods used by breeders in establishing desired character- 
istics. The scientific application of the laws of heredity, selection, 
variation, atavism, etc. 

Spring term. 

Text-book: Davenport's Principles of Breeding, 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE FIVE 
Animal Pathology 

A study of the detection, prevention, and treatment of the 
pathological diseases of the farm animals. Hog cholera, tuber- 
culosis, and abortion will be treated more fully than other diseases 
of less importance to the farmer. 

Spring term. 

Text-books : Government and Utate Publications. 



122 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

AGRONOMY COURSE ONE 
Cereal and Forage Crops 
A study of the varieties of wheat, corn, oats, barley, and rye. 
The judging, grading, and storing of the cereals for seed or mar- 
ket. A study of the forage crops which demand the attention 
of the farmer in the autum months will be taken up. Alfalfa 
and silage will receiv considerable attention. 
Fall term. 
Text-book : Hunt's Cereals in America. 

AGRONOMY COURSE TWO 
Soil Physics 

A study of the formation and classification of soils; capillary, 
hygroscopic, and gravitational water; the effects of drainage and 
color of soils on soil temperature; the granulation and puddling 
of soils; the preparation of the seed bed and the proper tillage for 
the various crops. 

Winter term. 

Text-books: Lyon and Fippins' Soils and Mosier and Gus- 
tafson's Laboratory Manual for Soil Physics. 

AGRONOMY COURSE THREE 
Crop Production 
This course includes a study of the methods of planting and 
cultivating the various cereal and forage crops. The treatment 
for insect, weed, and fungous enemies of the cereals and forage 
plants. Conservation of the water supply for cereal and forage 
crops. Curing and marketing of hay. 
Spring term. 
Text-book : Hunt's Cereals in America. 

AGRONOMY COURSE FOUR 
Concrete Construction and Drainage 

This course includes a study of the making of concrete floors, 
walls, blocks, tile, posts, tanks, and troughs. Considerable time 
is spent in the mixing and reinforcing of concrete. The work 
in surveying consists of the surveying of field, the location of fence 
lines, and the laying out of systems of tile drains. The work in 
surveying and drainage is largely field work. 

Fall term. r! 

Text-books: State and Government Bulletins, 

AGRONOMY COURSE FIVE 

'lb' fl 
Farm Machinery 

A study of the various types of power and field machines for 
the farm. The major part of the course will be devoted to a study 
of the gas and steam engin, and the more complex forms of field 
machinery of the farm. J 

Winter term. 

Text-book. Davidson and Chase's Farm Machines and Farm 
Motors. 



k 



« 



Illinois State Normal University 123 

AGRONOMY COURSE SIX 
Soil Fertility 

This course is a study of the various types of crop rotations, 
together with a study of the fertilizers necessary to maintain the 
soil fertility. Considerable time is spent in growing pot cultures, 
and in a study of the results obtaind on fertilizer plots. 
Fall term. 

Text-book: Hopkins's Soil Fertility and Permanent Agricul- 
ture. 

AGRONOMY COURSE SEVEN 
Soil Fertility 

This course is a continuation of Agronomy Six. It consists 
of a detaild study of the results obtaind in soil fertility tests 
at the various state experiment stations. 

Winter term. 

Text-book: Hopkins's Soil Fertility and Permanent Agri- 
culture, 

AGRONOMY COURSE EIGHT 

Farm Management 

A course in selecting the farm, planning the rotation, lo- 
cating the fields, lots, and bildings, and keeping the farm ac- 
counts. In addition to the work as outlined above the student 
spends some time in acquainting himself with the various forms 
of legal papers with which the farmer has to deal. 

Winter term. 

Text-book: Warren's Farm Management. 

HORTICULTURE COURSE ONE 
Orcharding and Gardening 

This course includes a study of graftage, cuttage, layerage, 
pruning, and spraying. Some time is spent in laying out orchards, 
selecting trees, planting trees, and cultivating the orchard after 
planting. The insect enemies of the tree, bush, and vine fruits 
ar studied. In connection with the work in fruit culture a study 
of the hot-bed, and cold-frame is taken up. The planting of the 
various plants follows the work with the hot-bed and cold-frame. 
The insect enemies of the vegetables ar also studied. 

Spring term. 

Text-books: Bailey's Principles of Fruit Growing and Bail- 
ey's Vegetable Gardening. 



124 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

HORTICULTURE COURSE TWO 
Landscape Gardening 
A course in the arrangement, and planting of the trees, 
shrubs, and flowers necessary for the proper decoration of home 
and school grounds. The care of flowers, trees and shrubs in 
winter and summer. The pruning of trees and shrubs. 
Spring term. 
Text-books: Government and State Bulletins. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Milk and Milk Products 

A course In the operation of the Babcock test, the testing of 

herds, the detection of adulterated milk, and the testing of milk, 

cream, butter, or cheese for butter fat, acid, bacteria, and 

adulterants. 

Spring term. 

Text-book: Farringdon and Wolls' Testing of Milk and Its 
Products. 

COUNTRY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

The purpose of this department is three-fold. 1. To pre- 
pare teachers for country schools. 2. To assist country teachers 
activly engaged in teaching. 3. To help stimulate rural progress. 
Two curriculums ar ofiferd thru the Country School Department: 
a one-year curriculum for students who hav had two years of 
high-school work and a two-year curriculum for graduates of the 
eighth grade. The completion of these counts two years toward 
the regular Normal-School Diploma. Curriculum provides the 
remaining courses needed for graduation. Upon finishing these 
two curriculums students ar given a special certificate testifying to 
the accomplishment of this work. These certificates may lawfully 
be accepted by county superintendents as evidence of qualification 
for third-grade teacher's certificates. 

COUNTRY SCHOOL SPECIAL COURSES 

COURSE ONE 
Country School Teaching 

This course deals with what to teach and how to teach it. 
The first work presented is a discussion of a few of the common 
terms used in psychology and in pedagogy, then there is a pre- 
sentation of the basal principles of method in reading, in fonics, in 
arithmetic, in writing, and in such other subjects as time will 
permit. A great many devices and helps ar made by the students 
to take to their schools for drills in these branches. 

Text: Charter's Teaching the Common Branches; The State 
Course of Study. 



i 



Illinois State Normal University 125 

COURSE TWO 

Country School Management 

This course deals with country school ideals and how to 
lealize them; and with school property and how to care for and 
'mprove it. There is at first some discussion of a few of the great 
ducational movements and reformers, also some study of present- 
ay educators and schools. Other topics discust ar : school law — 
larticularly the new Sanitation Law, daily program, seat work, 
isciplin, schoolroom decoration, school entertainments, and co- 
peration with school board and patrons. 

Text : The Rural School, Its Methods and Management, Culter 
,nd Stone. 

COURSE THREE 

Country School Problems 

This course deals with the district as a unit of study — its 
condition, its needs, and its possibilities. A study of the social 
rroups — the school children, the young people not in school, and 
he householders — and the school itself — common, standard, su- 
)erior, and consolidated. Enriching the curriculum with local 
naterial. Establishing and maintaining a social center. 

Text : Rural Life and Education, Cubberly, and Bulletins. 

COURSE FOUR 

j Rural Problems 

I For advanst students. The students study some of the country 
Problems now pressing for solution, and prepare addresses appro- 
)riate in speaking before a country audience. Some of the topics 
«r: community leadership, country school supervision, educating 
he old and the young, community friendship, co-operation, ideal 
country school system, ideal country teacher, etc. 

Text: Country Life and the Country School. Carney. 

Country School Extension 

Many country teachers hav a vision of social center work, and 
hey ar fortunate enuf to be located in districts that hav alredy 
'felt something of the gain that comes to those who go to school 
.0 themselvs. Our teachers and students hav been out to various 
districts encouraging this movement. They expect to increase this 
work and make it more helpful to those districts that ar willing 
to work with us. All teachers in districts where this work can be 
done should keep in touch with our plans. 



I 



126 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



COMMERCE 



In September, 1914, a department of Commercial Branche 
was establisht to prepare teachers in this fast-growing type o 
vocational education. The second floor of the Gymnasium Bildiiii 
has been remodeld and equipt with suitable furniture and appli 
ances to carry on the work. While the department has been or 
ganized primarily as a training school for commercial teachers 
yet it will give excellent training to such students as prefer secrfr 
tarial positions in the business world. 

The program is seven terms in length, covering two years 
time. The following courses ar offerd to those who enrol in th 
department : 

COURSE ONE 
Accounting 

Three terms' work in the theory and practis of accounts, be 
ginning with the more simple transactions and records of a smal 
retail business under a single proprietor. This small business i 
later enlarged to include wholesaling and the ownership is changei 
to a partnership. Students ar carefully traind not only in thi 
clerical work of bookkeeping but also in the analytical work d 
the accountant. In the spring term, upon the completion of thi 
assignd work in wholesale partnership, the type of business i 
again changed and the student is introduced to corporation aCt 
counting. Cost accounting as applied to the manufacture of i 
staple product is studied and many problems in factory accounts 
offiis management, and production factors, ar taken up. 

Text: Bookkeeping and Accountancy, H. M. Rowe Co. 

Opportunity for practis teaching in bookkeeping in the Uni^ 
versity High School is given to students who hav successful!) 
completed the Normal course in Accounting. 

COURSE TWO 
Bookkeeping (Summer Term) 

The inductiv development of the principles of double-entrj 
bookkeeping and their practical application in as many sets as th« 
length of the term will permit. 

Text: Budget 101, Commercial and Industrial Bookkeeping 
Rowe. 

COURSE THREE 
Accounting (Summer Term) 

The theory of accounts as developt from the standpoint of thi 
practising accountant. Solution of accountancy problems an( 
principles as applied to business statements, balance sheets, analy- 
ses, bankruptcy, the designing of bookkeeping systems, etc. 

Prerequisit: Course one. 

Text: Elements of Accounting, Klein. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 127 

COURSE FOUR 
Shorthand (First Year) 

The development of fonetic writing as conceivd by Gregg 
nd workt out in his manual. The Manual is supplemented by 
•/ork in shorthand, penmanship, and in progressiv exercizes in- 
ended to increase finger dexterity and a thoro understanding and 
kilful application of the principles of shorthand. 

Text : Manual of Shorthand, Gregg. 
COURSE FIVE 
Shorthand (Second Year) 

A careful review of the Gregg Manual, followd by progressiv 
iictation taken from standard dictation texts and covering many 
ypes of business correspondence. During the winter term it is 
ixpected to bring the student to a writing speed of approximately 
20 words per minute, and to that end there is much dictation ex- 
ending over a wide variety of material, i.e., sermons, addresses, 
lyllabi, testimony, legal forms, etc. Teaching methods ar intro- 
luced in the spring term and students ar encouraged to increase 
heir shorthand skill to verbatim speed. 

Texts: Gregg Speed Practis, Gregg. Shorthand Dictation 
iJxercises, Eldridge. 

COURSE SIX 
Typev/riting (First Year) 

The touch method is insisted upon in this course. The work 
lone in the course is based upon the subject matter as containd 
n a standard text, such as the Fritz-Eldridge Expert Typewriting, 
supplementary work begins during the winter term and consists 
)f direct dictation of plain copy for speed and accuracy, plain copy 
it sight, and blindfold dictation. In the spring term, shorthand 
ranscript work is begun. The formal work includes thirty-six 
essons in the text as a minimum requirement for one year's credit. 
Thirty words, net, per minute, is the rate pupils ar expected to 
reach at the end of the Spring term. 

Text: Expert Typewriting, Fritz-Eldridge. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Typewriting (Second Year) 
i The second year's work begins with a thoro review of finger- 
ing, to be followd by that portion of the text not included in the 
Dutline for the first year. A portion of the time is devoted to 
transcript work. Tabulation, rough drafts, and special work in 
typing makes up the schedule for the winter term. Frequent 
3peed tests as well as examinations for proficiency certificates, ar 
?iven. During the spring term ofils appliances ar used in connec- 
tion with this course, and the students ar given the course in ofiis 
training as set forth in "Ofiis Training" by Sorelle. Students ar 
3xpected to reach the certificate speed of sixty words net, per 
minute, on plain copy. 

Text: Expert Typewriting, Fritz-Eldridge; Offis Training for 
Stenografers, Sorelle. 



J 28 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE EIGHT 

Business Correspondence 

This course is given in the fall term of the first year and in-| 
eludes such review of the general rules of grammar, punctuatioi 
and sentence construction as the instructor deems necessary as ail 
introduction to the writing of business letters, advertizementsl 
pamflets, etc. Especial attention is given to correspondence fro| 
ihe point of view of selling. 

Text: English for Business Uses, Cody. 

COURSE NINE 
Commercial Law 

This is one of the most important of the commercial branche. 
and is very widely taught in the high schools. Two terms ar give] 
to the consideration of Commercial Law. The features to whicl 
most attention is given ar Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, Sales 
Agency, Insurance, Bailments, Partnership, Credits and Loans 
Corporations, Real and Personal Property, and Settlement of Es- 
tates. The preparation of legal forms is included in the course, 

Text: Elements of Business Law, Hufcutt. 

COURSE TEN 

Commercial Arithmetic 

This subject is offerd for one term in the second year. Th 
course is designd to include the usual applications of arithmeti 
to business organization, management, accounting, and to sue 
miscellaneous problems as arise in various types of business. Thi 
use of many ruled forms is an important feature. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Salesmanship and Advertizing: (Summer Term and Spring 

Term of Second Year) 

This course includes the study of the laws of appeal and re! 
sponse as applied to business; the advertizement in its composi 
tion, form and effectivness; and the principles of salesmanshij 
(retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and personal). 

Text: Art of Selling, Sheldon. 

COURSE TWELV 

History of Commerce 

The general history of business progress is surveyd : attentioi 
is given to the economic changes that hav taken place in the pas 
century, and to the future outlook along the lines of transporta- 
tion, banking, commercial treaties, and world markets. 



Illinois State Normal University 129 



8.!SM= 



1^ PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



This department exists because the state needs as teachers 
len and women of sound helth who ar traind to care for the 
hysical welfare of their pupils and set before them for imitation 
16 example of a dignified and erect bearing. 

Its aims ar two-fold: 
M 1. For the individual: to supply systematically one essential 
iement in hygienic living, namely, muscular exercize; and to en- 
)urage as related to this, proper habits of sleep, bathing, ventila- 
on, and diet, to correct common postural defects, and develop as 
3curate muscular control as may be possible in the time available. 

2. For the teacher: to make clear the relation between helth 
iid efficiency, the hygienic demand for systematic exercize in ele- 
entary and high school, and to supply a fairly comprehensiv 
uipment of practical work for use in such schools. 

Three terms' work in physical training is required of all stu- 
3nts, and every effort is made to adapt work to individual needs, 
his work is to be taken in the first year unless there be excellent 
3asons for postponing it. A careful record of the helth history of 
ach entering student is taken and a physical examination given, 
special class is provided for those thus shown to be unequal to 
16 work provided for the average beginner. In the rare cases 
here exercize even in this class is not suitable, individual work 
i prescribed and sufficient observation of class work assignd to 
nabie the future teacher to conduct simple exercizes in the school 
3oms and make intelligent use of games in the school yard. 

For physical training women ar required to hav a specific 
ymnasium suit, which can be orderd after arrival at a cost of 
3.75. Every woman needs also an athletic skirt for tennis, hockey, 
hd field work in Nature-Study, Geografy, and other sciences. 
1iis may be orderd on arrival or made at home. It should be 
Lrong, wide, and of shoe- top length, preferably navy blue or 
lack. 

Men require for the gymnasium two black sateen shirts, gray 
■ousers, and black tennis shoes. These can be obtaind after 
rrival at a cost of not more than $4.00. 






130 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSES FOR WOMEN ^|| 

COURSE ONE 

Gymnastics, folk dances, plays and games ar taught with coi 
sideration of their distinctly effects and suitability for use in tl 
school room or on the playground. Weekly lectures deal wi 
personal care and social behavior. Especial attention is given 
nose, throat, and teeth, bathing, posture, and dress. 

Four hours' floor work, one hour lecture. 

COURSE ONE (A) 
Arranged for women whose helth history and physical tes 
show them not redy for Course I. Enrolment will be limited ai 
special attention given to individual cases. 

COURSE TWO 

More vigorous and difficult forms of gymnastics, dancing, ai 
games. Apparatus work is introduced and a study of Bancrof 
Posture Training of School Children is substituted for week 
lectures. 

Time requirement as for Course I. 

COURSE THREE 
Posture training is continued during the first part of the ten 
gymnastics with hand apparatus and simple forms of esthe 
dancing ar introduced; organized games playd out of doors occu 
a prominent place in this course. Three hours of exercize a 
one hour for discussion of principles and methods. 

COURSE FOUR (Elegtiv) 
Outdoor sports, including volley ball, basket ball, hockt 
tennis. Reading, discussion, and note books. Time required sai 
as preceding courses. Open to women whose physical tests sh« 
them equal to such work. 

COURSE FIVE (Elegtiv) 
Esthetic dancing is offerd twice a week during both win 
and spring terms. Students taking all of this work receiv c 
minor credit. Note books required. Open to all women qualifi 

COURSE SIX (Elegtiv) 
Gymnastig Teaching and Playground Management 

The first six weeks of the term will be devoted to princip 
and methods used in Gymnastic teaching, and will be arranged 1' 
those who wish to make a specialty of physical training in eleme 
tary or high schools. During the remaining six weeks the pc 
sibilities of the playground, its organization and equipment, v,^ 
be taken up. Playground activities will be considerd in det£. 
and will be accompanied by supervizion of play in the traini' 
school. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1 and 2. Spring term. 

Text: The Posture of School Children, Bancroft. 



Illinois State Normal University 131 

COURSES FOR MEN 

All men, except those physically disabled, ar required to take 
;te first three courses during the first year of attendance, unless 
iceptable reasons ar given for not doing so. All such men must 
IV the work completed before graduation, unless excused at open- 
g of the school year before graduation time. 

COURSE ONE (Fall Term) 
Base Ball, Foot Ball, Soccer, and Tennis 

Practis: Four periods per week. Base ball, foot ball, and 
nnis will begin with the opening of the term. Soccer will take 
e place of base ball when cool wether comes. Each man must 
low a certain degree of skill in tivo of the four sports to obtain 
edit for the fall term. 

Pedagogy: One period per week. 

1. Rules for foot ball, soccer, and tennis. 2. Lectures on 
;rsonal hygiene, training and first aid. 

, Books : Official Foot Ball Guide, Official Soccer Guide Official 
srmis Guide, Note Book. 

COURSE TWO (Winter Term) 

Elementary Marching, Calisthenics, Hevy Apparatus, Volley 
Ball, Indoor Base Ball, and Basket Ball 

Practis: Five periods per week. 

COURSE THREE (Spring Term, Men) 
Base Ball, Track and Field Athletics, and Tennis 

Practis : Four periods per week. Base ball two periods. Track 
ork two periods. Credit will be given for tennis two periods 
jr week, provided one period is given to base ball and one to 
ack work. 

Pedagogy. One period per week. Rules for base ball. Rules 
' track and field. Training. 

Books : Official Base Ball Guide, Intercollegiate Athletic 
andbook, Note Book. 



132 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



COURSE FOUR (Elegtiv, Fall Term) 

Prerequisit: Course 1. 

Practis: With University foot ball team, or class team 
base ball and soccer. 

Pedagogy: Four periods per week. 1. Rules of foot ball 
soccer, and tennis from the standpoint of coaching and officiatin] 
2. Officiating in class games and 'Varsity practis games. 
Training. 4. First aid to injured. 

Books: Official Football Guide, Official Soccer Guide, OjJ 
ficial Tennis Guide. Text-books will be announst at opening of tl 
term. 

ilajor : One credit. 

COURSE FIVE (Elegtiv, Winter Term) 

Prerequisit: Course 2. 

Practis : Two periods per week in intermediate gymnasti) 
— free handwork, light apparatus, and hevy apparatus. 

Pedagogy: Three periods per week. Practis in teachii 
marching and gymnastics. Place of physical training in educjj 
tion. Leading systems of gymnastics. Methods of teachiDl 
Physiological effects of exercize. 

Books: Teaching of Elementary School Gymnastics, W. i| 
Bowen; Manual of Marching, Cornell and Berry; Official BasiA 
Ball Rules; Official Volley Ball Rules; Note Book; extensiv libra)| 
work. 

N. B. — Those taking this course will need to keep open eithjj 
the seventh period or the eighth period two days per week to 
in teaching squads in Course 2. 

Major: One credit. '■ 

COURSE SIX FOR MEN (Elegtiv, Spring Term) 



Prerequisit: Course 3. 

Practis: University base ball and track team, or class b^| 
ball and track team. 

Pedagogy: Four periods per week. Base ball rules frc 
standpoint of coaching and officiating. Track base ball rules fro 
standpoint of coaching and officiating. Athletic administratic 
Management of athletic meets. Play and playgrounds. 

Major: One credit. 



Illinois State Norinal University 133 

COURSES IN LIBRARY METHOD 

COURSE ONE 

The Use of the Library 

Ten weekly lessons for all first year students. The practical 
part of the work is to be applied by each student to the work that 
he has on hand for the term. Wednesdays to take the place of 
Physical Training. 

COURSE TWO 

The Formation and Care op School Libraries 

Eight weekly lectures, spring term. Same in five weekly lec- 
tures, first summer term. Course illustrated with exhibits of 
books and library equipment. An hour a week outside of the lec- 
tures will give full time for examining the exhibits and arranging 
the note-books. 

COURSE THREE 
Library Pragtis 

The librarian offers a course also in library apprentisship 
which includes simple details of the care, management, and use of 
a library, with mending books, mounting pictures, etc. From four 
to six students ar employd each term as library assistants; this 
affords further instruction and practis in library administration. 

Special instruction is offerd to juniors and seniors in the 
preparation of term papers and graduation themes. 

Fall term. 



134 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT 

This department includes a well-equipt kindergarten in charge 
of a director and assistant. 

It offers to students an opportunity for observation and for 
practis in the teaching of classes. Children may enter at the age 
of four, and ar supposed to remain two years. The kindergarten 
is primarily a social institution and stands for co-operativ activ- 
ity. It aims to develop children physically, mentally, and morally, 
by directing their natural activities in an educational way. Be- 
cause the kindergarten has proved a potent factor in transforming 
modern educational theory and practis, there has come about a de- 
mand for primary teachers who hav been traind in the principles 
and methods of the kindergarten. 

The Kindergarten Primary Course is offerd to meet this de- 
mand. It covers a period of two years. Students ar admitted at 
the opening of the fall term only. They must be graduates of an 
approved high school, or hav done equivalent work. 

Three terms of observation and teaching in the Kindergarten, 
and two terms of teaching in the primary grade ar required. 

KINDERGARTEN TECHNICS (Junior Year) 

This course includes a study of the gifts, occupations, songs, 
stories, plays and games of the kindergarten: original exercizes 
ar pland by each member of the class, and presented for dis- 
cussion and criticism. 

Gifts : This comprises a study of the Froebelian gifts as edu- 
cational toys, in connection with other play materials, to discover 
their value as mediums of expression. 

Occupations : The kindergarten occupations ar studied in con- 
nection with modern construction work and nature materials suited 
to the needs of children. 

Games and Rhythms: In this connection a study is made of 
the play instincts of children. Plays and games adapted to differ- 
ent stages of the child's development ar considerd, their educa- 
tional value noted, and practis given in playing kindergarten 
games. A classification of plays and games is made, including 
motor, sensory, and dramatic plays, traditional ring games, rhyth- 
mic exercizes and marches. 

Story -Telling: A study is made of the different kinds of 
stories, their origin and value. Principles of selection, adapta- 
tion, and classification ar considerd and opportunity is given to 
tell stories to different groups of children. 

Text: Stories and Story -Telling, Bailey. 



♦ 



Illinois State Normal University 135 

KINDERGARTEN THEORY (Junior, Two Terms) 

The aim of this course is a study of Froebel's general theories 
and Mother Plays, in connection with modern child-study liter- 
ature. 

Texts: Froebel's Educational Laws, Hughes; The Mother 

Play, Froebel. 

KINDERGARTEN THEORY (Senior Year) 

Fall term. 

This course includes a study of the history of the kindergar- 
ten and the relation of the kindergarten to the primary grades. 

Text: History of Kindergarten in American Education, Van- 
dewalker. 

Winter term. 

This course deals with the principles of program-making, 
of problems in admistration, and of the Montessori system of edu- 
cation. 

SPECIAL COURSE (Spring Term) 

This course is pland for primary teachers who wish some 
knowledge of the principles and practis of the kindergarten. It 
is recommended to all teachers who ar training for primary work. 
All fases of kindergarten work ar discust, with daily observation 
of groups of children. 

PRACTIS TEACHING 

The training department consists of the elementary school 
including a kindergarten and eight grades, and of the University 
High School. The school of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, with four 
hundred thirty-five pupils, will also be used as a school of observa- 
tion and practis after September, 1916. Seventeen teachers devote 
their entire time to this department;, several others assist in the 
training-school work. 

The Training School is designd to give careful and extensiv 
training in the art of teaching in all grades and in all the special 
subjects taught in public schools. Each student in the Normal 
School and Teachers College is required to teach three terms. In 
some cases the daily observation and criticism of a class, foUowd 
by a written or oral discussion ar taken in lieu of one term in 
each of the three departments, Primary, Intermediate, and Gram- 
mar School. But students desiring to fit themselvs for any par- 
ticular grade of school work, or any special branch of study, ar 
given an opportunity to do so. Teachers of satisfactory training 
and experience who wish to prepare themeselvs for expert work 
as training teachers ar allowd all the advantages of the Training 
School. 



136 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



mm 



The work of teaching is carefully supervized by the training 
teachers. Each student teacher is required to write out the plans 
of recitation one week in advance. These plans ar closely examind 
by the training teacher and, where necessary, discust with the 
student teacher and revized. The instruction itself is also observd 
by the training teacher, and helpful criticisms ar given in private. 
Each practising teacher is held fully responsible for the control and 
management, as well as for the instruction of the class. He is 
expected to develop skill and power in management and instruction 
of a class as a whole, and at the same time to study and adapt 
the work to the individual ability and disposition of each pupil. 
As far as possible during the last two terms of his instruction, 
the student teacher is given charge of a room; so he is supervizing 
one class at the same time that he is teaching another. 

Students who hav had no experience in teaching find it best 
generally to observ a class one full term in the Training School 
before undertaking the instruction of a class. Careful criticism 
and discussions of the lessons observd ar required of each ob- 
server. 

Each week, two illustrativ or "critique" lessons ar given by 
experienst teachers. Teachers and observers ar required to observ 
one of these lessons each week. An hour following the lesson 
is devoted to its careful discussion under the direction of the 
supervizor of the Training School. This gives each teacher an 
opportunity each term to see eleven such lessons carefully pre- ^ 
sented and thoroly discust. 

In all observation of the students attention is directed— 

1. To the teacher's preparation for the work thru mastery; 
of subject matter, lesson planning and providing external means. 

2. To the teacher's skill in teaching as shown in skill in as- 
signment, in skill in questioning, in energy, in disciplin, in power 
of holding attention thru interest, in rediness to meet emergencies, '. 
in attention to details of form and position, in ability to discern ; 
and meet the needs of individual pupils, in the use of apparatus 
and other aids, in attention to the physical condition of pupils, in 
attention to the language of pupils. 

3. To the teacher's personal fitness as reveald in his atti- 
tude towards his pupils and his work, his ability to make use of 
criticism, his voice, language, manner, and personal care in 
mechanical work. 

Certain students ar also appointed regularly to supervize 
the children at noon, recesses, and during study periods. 

The training teachers present illustrativ lessons, at such 
times as ar convenient, for the benefit of the students who ar 
preparing for work in the Training School. 



Illinois State Normal University 137 

COURSE OF STUDY IN THE TRAINING 
SCHOOL 

A brief statement of the course is made below. A detaild 
ianalysis by subjects, years and terms will be furnisht on appli- 
bation. 

Literature. — Daily exercize in Mother Goose, Robinson Crusoe, 
Hiawatha, The Jungle Book, and stories and poems from other 
writers thru the first three years. From the fourth year thru the 
eighth the literature is combined with the reading. 

Reading. — Three lessons per day during the first two years. 
One lesson per day in all other except the seventh. In the seventh 
year reading alternates with history. 

Writing. — Writing exercizes occur daily during the first two 
jrears and one term of the seventh year. 

Spelling. — Daily spelling exercizes thru the seventh grade 
upon words occurring in regular studies. 

Language. — Incidental training thru the first six years. 

English Grammar. — Daily exercizes thru seventh and eighth 
j^ears in all terms but one; two lessons per week in that term. The 
work follows the Illinois State Course of Study. 

Arithmetic. — The Illinois State Course of Study is strictly 
followd thruout the eight years. 

Geografy. — Daily lessons from the third year thru the seventh. 

History. — Oral presentation of pioneer history stories during 
the fourth year. Daily lessons in United States History during 
the fifth and sixth years and two terms of the eighth year. In the 
seventh year history alternates with reading. 

Civil Government. — Last term of eighth year. 
I Nature Study. — Daily lessons in garden, the campus, or the 
beenhouse in the fall and spring terms in the last four years; 
in the spring terms of fifth, sixth, and seventh years, in fall and 
spring terms of the eighth year. 

Elementary Physics. — Daily lessons during winter terms of 
ill years but seventh and eiglith and also m the fall term of fifth 
md seventh years. 

Astronomy. — Fall term of sixth year. 

Physiology. — Oral lessons in lower grades. Daily lessons with 
:ext book in wmter terms — seventh and eighth years. 

Music. — Twenty minutes daily in all grades. 

Drawing. — Exercizes averaging three per week in all grades 
above second. In primary grades associated with other studies. 

Manual Training. — Daily exercizes in primary grades, alter- 
nating with drawing in grades three to six; in seventh and eighth 
rears pupils spend two hours per week at bench work in shop. 

Physical Training. — Brief daily exercizes in schoolroom. Reg- 
ular lessons from the physical director on Wednesday. 



138 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



STUDENTS 




TEACHERS COLLEGE GRADUATES 



POSTOFnS 



.McLean Normal 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Normal 



Anderson, Lillian ■ 

Blackburn, Eunice 

Blackburn, Jane Ann — TTnTv.Hal» 

Boling, Carroline Mary l.^'f^^^^ N?S 

Bush, Jessie Catherine McLean Norm^ 

Coen, Constance McLean pftts3 

S??iW^.S5f-:::::::::::;::::::::;:::::::|^F----^^^^^^^^ 

Lrson^'Se„r:;::::::::::::::::::::::::M^^^^^^^^ 

S&e.^''¥^a«/7Xse7.::;:::::;:::::::::Kn-v;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;^ 

Lightbody, Ernest Rieger Peoria Tmv 

Smith, John Aaron Madison WincheS 

Smith, Willard Carl Scott WavSlI 

Stevens, Earl Grover Morgan Waverty 

White, George f^ %TrU riinton 

WilsoA, Thomas Jefferson De Witt Clinton 



JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 



.McLean Bloomington 

.Morgan JacksonviUe 

.McLean Stanford 

.McLean Danvera 

Chapman, Natalie Cass Ashkndj 

Clark, E^ie Dale ''-'•^!^ •::::::::: :::::::;;;;;;;;;-.v 'iSS!' 



Alexander, Portia . . 
Badger, Mrs. Grace.. 
Baird, Hazelle Electa 
Bush, Helen Lucile . 



Cook,' Marie Madison Versailles 

- nc Brown Versailles 

McLean S"**^*V 

Gasaway, Alice E..:::: McLean No^ 

Hieronymus,^ Iva Vern Logan ••••:••••.•.;•.•.:.•.•.•.■.•. . . » 



Foster, 

Freed, Alma Maud 



Hogan, Gertrude Christian 

Hueni, Bertha Livingston ^o^ 

Johnson, Esther Louise McLean Normal, 

Johnson, Marian March }l^\f^^ Mt Camd. 

King. Mabel Anne ^^abash — ::::::::■ — y '^orS^ 

Lundeen, Mildred ^-7, Pprro Gordo* 

Macy, Mable Nadine fia" NoS 

Manchester, Miriam Flora .McLean ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:v;;;;;;;-BloorSnSS 

.McLean Bloomington^ 

McLean •• LcRoS[ 



Means, LaVerna 
Mueller, Vema 
Neal, Opal A. 



S?s;^X'Alia-miza:::::::::::::::::::::::::McLean ^^n^^ 

Ost, Mabel Elizabeth Vermilion .-. DanvUW 

Parks, Gladys Elizabeth Brown ^Mt. Sterhnj 

Peters, Frances Elizabeth Logan New HoUana 



Pettit, Marian Esther 



.Bureau Neponset 



Reitz,' Nellie WiUamine . .ly.ii'.iil'.i'.i'.il'.i.Menard ^MansS 

Sherrard, Helen Van Meter Piatt ^..Mansheld 



Swaim, Ada Clare '.V.-V- McLean Gibson^City 

Boley, Arthur W.._ 
Brandenburger, Friedolin 



Olney 



Boley, Arthur W R^c^^^^.d FreeburK 

Brandenburger, Friedolin St- Clair F 1 Pa2 

Bullock, Forrest Minor y/"?/-'"^ Sullivan 

Butler, Charles Henry Moultrie S 

Carrington, John Wesley Iroquois ^^ ; 

comp, Verne D Bureau :::::::::::::::' su^SS 1 

Fearheiley, Lewis ^awrence Oolconda • 

Hacker, Linder William ?°?\.--'V St foC' 

Herriott, Marion E g^sf '""^ ;::V.V.:' ciiandS 

Jackson, Euns o^ ,u Stra^burs 

Norris, Halvem Lamar She by StrasDU^ 

Ramsay, Dwight Mendenhall Will JO'^ 

Tice, Harold I Menard ^la 






Illinois State Normal University 139 
NORMAL SCHOOL GRADUATES 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Anderson, Helen F Will Joliet 

Archambeault, Geraldine C (Wisconsin) Peshtigo 

Augspurger, Pearl L Ford Gibson City 

Balmer, Margaret B Richland Olney 

Bennett, Cora L Henry Annawan 

Billings, Leta Rae F McLean Normal 

Boley, Bessie H Richland Calhoun 

Bruce, William Shirley C La Salle Ransom 

Changnon, Edna Martha L Kankakee St. Anne 

Colgrove, Mary Lucretia A Vermilion Danville 

Crosby, Alene L McLean Normal 

Crosby, Irene L McLean Normal 

Cummings, Kathryn C Hancock Dallas City 

Cusick, Nora A Peoria Edwards 

Dean, Jessie B Bureau La Moille 

Duvall, Anne Elizabeth G Macon Argenta 

Felton, Ruth B McLean Bloomington 

Fields, Marguerite E C Vermilion Hoopeston 

Fink, Flora A St. Clair O'Fallon 

Fisher, Carrie Uhland A Adams Payson 

Frey, Lydia Mayme L Livingston Gridley 

Funk, Lela F McLean Normal 

Garlough, Zoe Irene G-H McLean Normal 

Gates, Harriet Elizabeth H Cook Chicago 

Gillespie, Annie Walton B Rock Island Rock Island 

Goodheart, Stella A McLean Normal 

Gregg, Lela May C Gallatin Omaha 

Gregg, Nora Inez G Gallatin Omaha 

Guttery, Ruth Irene A Logan Lincoln 

Guy, Elva C St. Clair Belleville 

Hayes, Josephine B McLean Bloomington 

Henry, Irene Marr B Cook Chicago 

Hey, Mary Isabel C Cook Chicago 

Hogue, Norma A A Warren Monmouth 

Hollis, Mabel Dee G Menard Petersburg 

Hudak, Julia Veronica B Will Joliet 

Ibbotson, Helen Bland D Cook '..Chicago 

Jinings, Vera Viola L Woodford Secor 

Kamm, Leonie G-H Madison Highland 

Kelley, Prudence C Greene Carrollton 

Leever, Agnes A Fayette Vandalia 

Mann, Lydia Eliza B Vermilion Hoopeston 

Marriott, Alma Elverta C McLean Chenoa 

Marshall, Marie Elsie B Tazewell Minier 

Miller, Emily L Cook Chicago 

Moberly, Grace C Cook Chicago 

Montgomery, Irene A DeWitt Clinton 

Moore, Delia Sears B Scott Naples 

Nicol, Verl Mary L McLean '.'.*. Covell 

O'Neill, Elletta B McLean Bloomington 

Parsons, Cecil Dorothy A Madison Granite City 

Pierce, Minnie Mae B Woodford El Paso 

Place, Jean Ruth G Stephenson .'.'.'.*.* Freeport 

Potts, Kathryn Winifred D Moultrie Lovington 

Raycraft, Phyllis A McLean Bloomington 

Reynolds, Effie Elizabeth G-H Ford Gibson City 

Robbins, Mary G McLean Bloomington 

Roe Helen Rebecah H McLean Bloomington 

Schlabach, Gladys C McLean Normal 

Scott, Coaina Marie C (Iowa) Davenport 

Seed, Mary Ina A Richland Qhiey 

Seitz Hazel Pearl A McLean Normal 

Sherden, May F Henry Cambridge 

Shipley, Lucile A Macon Maro\ 

bhowers, Fannie A Moultrie ..: Bethany 

Simpkins Josephine L McLean Bloomington 

Smith, Winifred Vera D McLean Bloomington 

Stoltze, Mane Elizabeth B McLean Normal 

btracke, Irma Agnes G-H Hancock Warsaw 

Swickard, Niza Ethel G-H Douglas Newman 

Swigart, Verneil E H De Witt Farmer City 

Tappe Nina Marie G-H McLean Bloomington 

lerrell, Maude L Mason Easton 

Thomas, Rhue L Menard Oakford 

rramor, Emma C Jaspar Newton 



140 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Twomey, Mildred B McLean Bloomington 

Whalen, Agnes Marie H Livingston Pontiac 

Wiechert, Esther B St. Clair - Belleville 

Wolk, Leanora Aldene C Woodford El Paso 

Woolston, Mary Alice B Montgomery Nokomis 

Braun, Edward Joseph I Livingston Saunemin 

Burtis, Edwin J McLean Hudson 

Changnon, Dale E Kankakee St. Anne 

Courtwright, Russell Albert J McLean Normal 

Cox, Carroll Downey J McLean Normal 

Deal, Roy E McLean Normal 

Duncanson, Mark L Peoria Peoria 

Eusey, Samuel E Macon Decatur 

Harrell, Wilburn R E Vv^hite Omaha 

Holmes, Parker Manfred I McLean Normal 

Johnson, Grover Everett E Ford Gibson City 

Johnson, Waldo Theo I McLean Bloomington 

Kettering, Ray Mason E McLean Normal 

McCord, Orville E McLean Normal 

Musick, Harry E E Logan Lincoln 

Niehart, William Marion E Christian Pana 

Schneider, Oscar E McLean Normal 

Shirck, Daniel E Logan Atlanta 

Smith, Robert Sumner I Macon Decatur 

Sturdivant, James Oscar E Mercer Joy 

Vanneman, Edgar J McLean Normal 

Wildy, Frank R L St. Clair Dupo 

Yeck, Raymond D E Woodford Roanoke 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

. Teachers College and Normal School 
September 13, 1915— June 8, 1916 

Abbot, Amy B Champaign Mahomet 

Adams, Grace Anna N Clark West Union • 

Adams, Jane Ruth A Christian Moweaqua 

Alexander, Julia K McLean Bloomington 

Allen, Ruth Muriel M McLean „ ?"** 

Ambrose, Ruth A McLean ^^°1°" 

Amidon, Adeline A Kankakee Herscher ^ 

Anderson, Eva June L Tazewell Delavan ■ 

Anderson, Hulda G-H Putnam Hennepin 

Andrew, Feme Iva A IMcLean Heyworth ; 

Armstrong, Ruth Baylor M McLean t;°™*i 

Armstrong, Violet Elaine N McLean Normal 

Atterberry, Golda Bell P Menard Atterberry 

Augustine, Frances K McLean Normal 

Austin, Lois F McLean Bloomington" 

Badur, Florence A Logan ^t"'^" i ' 

Bailey, Florence Caroline B McLean ^.o"nal , 

Baine, Mary Jane K McLean Bloomington < 

Baker, Flossie Mae A McLean Normal 

Barding, Ina Mildred P Christian i'ana 

Barnard, Dorothe A Livingston . _ ±'anoia ' 

Bartlett, Emily Male K Pike GriggsviUe ^ 

Barton, Marjorie Jewell N Will •• Peotone 

Batchelder, Ina Loretta A Macon Harnstown 

Bean, Hazel Gale G-H Macon Blue Mound . 

Beierman, Anna Josephine K Montgomery Kaymona 

Belsley, Olive K Woodford Metamora 

Eerensmier, Clara P McLean Bloomington 

Beschle, Ruth Annetia M Macon • • ..J^^^on 

Bierbower, Mabel Fern H McLean Bellflower 

Bierbower, Velma Lois P McLean Arrowsmit^ 

Bishop, Tillie Jane B (Missouri) t "^1„ 

Biven, Viva Gertrude N McLean ^, ^^y 

Blackburn, Florence E L Madison EdwardsviUe 

Blair, Hazel Oneta B McLean c,^°t7^„ 

Bledsoe, Doris Lodema K Fayette St. Llrao 

Bliss, Bertha Elizabeth ..C Peoria P"""\! S 

Bloom, Elsie Mae L Putnam n^J^Ht 

Blossom, Mina Lucretia L Marion ^l?:!iil 

Bond, Mildred Constance K McLean ^r „Z. 

Boswell, Marguerite Elta C Kankakee Momence 



Illinois State Normal University 



141 



11 NAME SECTION 

■ium, Marybelle N 

. wman, Leona Florence G 

ind, Dorothy Mildred K 

;ese, Anna D PI 

; ,^ese, Edith Jean A 

;ese, Rachel Given K 

Meton, Katherine A 

jssie, Lorna K 

:ssie, Ramona K 

-tall, Florence Carmen C 

:ock, Helen Ruth K 

;)kaw, Dell Marie K 

:own, Carrie K 

: )wn, Edith Morrell C 

jisch, Anna Sarah K 

; /ant, Ada E N 

; nyard, Harriet G 

: rdick, Ivah Gertrude L 

.' rns, Mary Eugenia K 

1ms, Maude Flossie B 

:'rns, Nettie Chloe C 

:tler, Grace D 

(llahan, Nonie Madelon A 

< mpbell, Grace Virginia N 

(rberry, Helen Agnes M 

( rrigan, Nell A 

(rson, Louise K 

(-ter, Louise H 

( ier, Verna Irene K 

(;h, Elsie Myrtle D 

( 5well, Hazel Louise B 

( ighey, Mabel Agnes P 

(ighey, Nelle Mae F 

(vanagh, Nora M 

( ,'anagh, Rose Lorraine L 

( /anagh, Teresa M 

(ipman, Mrs. F. R J 

( ;noweth, Olive Elizabeth K 

(;shire, Ruth Frederica C 

( rk, Emma Myrtle C 

(rk, Ethel C 

( rk, Margaret Helen J 

( y ton, Eula Grace B 

Cary, Nellie Grace P 

( aw, Grace Louise A 

dins. Bertha O 

(mor, Elizabeth G M 

()ke, Mary Gertrude P 

(:ieland, Zillah E L 

( bitt, jeanette Florence A 

(dell, Thelma J 

( rigan, Alice E M 

( ven, Mrs. Mary P B 

C ig, Margie Elizabeth B 

( ne, Catherine B 

( ath, Anna Gertrude B 

Cel, Edith Mae A 

(Meld, Helen B 

(okshank, Rachel L 

(we, Edith Marie L 

( lenbine, Mary Magdalen M 

(iningliam, Blanche M 

( tis, Gertha L 

( tis, Hazel B 

( tiss, Edythe Jeanette M 

( tev, Luella Marie G-H 

1 c, Mabel Lena H 

I igherty, Mrs. Jean G 

I is, Alfa A 

lis, Elma Alberta D 

r is. May Randolph P 

In, Mary Lervina P 

1 Costa, Florence Ellen M 

I tns, Lorena Velma N 

I iner, Gertrude N 

I aney, Jeanie L 

r Weerth, Katie Ella N 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Morgan Jacksonville 

Macon Decatur 

McLean Normal 

McLean Lexington 

McLean Normal 

McLean Lexington 

Tazewell Pekin 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

Cook Oak Park 

Kankakee Kankakee 

Henderson Stronghurst 

McLean Normal 

Shelby Moweaqua 

McLean Normal 

Jackson Murphysboro 

DeWitt Farmer City 

Christian Stonington 

]\Ioultrie Sullivan 

Moultrie Sullivan 

Bureau Princeton 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

Livingston Fairbury 

Sangamon Springfield 

Woodford Panola 

(Nebraska) Omaha 

DeWitt Clinton 

Stark Toulon 

Vermilion Hoopeston 

Tazewell Delavan 

Livingston Chatsworth 

Livingston Chatsworth 

Livingston Pontiac 

Livingston Chatsworth 

Livingston Chatsworth 

Adams Quincy 

Logan Atlanta 

Christian Assumption 

Christian Assumption 

Greene Roodhouse 

McLean Normal 

Ford Kempton 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Downs 

Adams Quincy 

Macon Niantic 

McLean Bloomington 

Macon Blue Mound 

McLean Gridley 

Lake Highland Park 

Livingston Corned! 

Macon Decatur 

Mercer Seaton 

Pike Pittsfield 

St. Clair East St. Louis 

Macon Decatur 

Tazewell Minier 

McLean Randolph 

Peoria Laura 

Bureau Arlington 

Iroquois Onarga 

McLean Colfax 

Henry Kewanee 

Livingston Odell 

McLean Normal 

Mason Mason City 

Cass Virginia 

Macon Decatur 

McLean Bloomington 

Livingston Forrest 

Pike Pittsfield 

Sangamon Springfield 

McLean Bloomington 

Logan Lincoln 

Macon Niantic 

Peoria Mapleton 



142 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFF] 

Dillard, Glenna M Tazewell Deer Cree 

Dixon, Maude Alice N Will Symertc 

Dodd, Luella Irene N Ford Loc 

Doherty, Edna Marguerite C (North Dakota) Fairmoui 

Dole, Mary Izetta A Kankakee Manter 

Doner, Alice Amanda L Moultrie Bethai 

Donovan, Margaret A Christian Assumptic 

Dormire, Lelia Fern D Brown Coope^sto^^ 

Downs, Jennie L McLean Norm 

Doyle, Hazel May A Peoria Peor 

Duff, Janie Mae L McLean Norm 

Duff, Julia Edith H McLean Norm 

Dunbar, Cora Ann K McLean Norm 

Dunn, Ida May B Champaign Urbai 

Durham, Margaret Bessie N Bureau Wain 

Eaton, Alice Cora K McLean Norm 

Eberle, Elizabeth Joan .. K Logan Lmco 

Edds, Myrtus Verne C McLean Norm 

Eddy, Vera Isyl N Bureau La Moi 

Edel, Velda L McLean Cooksvi 

Emerson, Edith Anne K Christian Stoningt^ 

Eminger, Mabel K Ford Gibson Ci 

Ennis, Frances Lillian C Montgomery Pawn 

Ernthaller, Magdalen M Marshall Tolu 

Ernthaller, Rose Marie M Marshall Tolu 

Evatt, Estella G-H (Arkansas) Waldr 

Exter, Margaret Ruth M St. Clair Freebu 

Fairbaim, Alice Beatrice B Will Jol 

Fairchild, Agnes Elda M Tazewell m 

Fanelli, Mrs. Fern D McLean Bloommgt 

Fehr, Lillian Charlotte C McLean Nom 

Firth, Mrs. Mary A G Peoria Peo; 

Fletcher, Hazel Rebecca N Mason Saidc 

Flutro, Adelle Anne A Iroquois Medc 

Foran, Anna Marie L Putnam Granv, 

Fort, Gustina N McLean B oomingt 

Fort, Stella N McLean Blooming- 

Fraker, Helen Josephine G Shelby Shelbyv 

Frederick, Nelle Grace H McLean Bloorning' 

Freeman, Jessie Orvetta P McLean ^o^r 

French, Ada N McLean Le 1< 

French, Marcella J McLean Norn 

Frost, Gertrude Lockwood P McLean Blooming 

Funk, Gladys H McLean bhir 

Gassner, Roma Pearl N McLean Arrowsm 

Cast, Hattie Marie N Will Peotc 

Gates, Anna Elizabeth B Will • Plamfi 

Gerrietts, Freda Sophia N Mason l-orrest L 

Ghiglieri, Frances A Marshall joH 

Gilbert, Grace Virginia C St. Clair Bellev 

Giles, Anna Louise A Tazewell -Ueia^ 

Gilliland, Elfleda Holmes G-H McLean "u^^" 

Givens, Alpha Mae B McLean Heywc 

Glasgow, Mary N McLean --A-i-^u 

Glass, Laura Luella P Kankakee Buckmgh 

Glover, Hazel Genevieve L Marshall ^^^P' 

Golev, Anna Winifred N Livingston Eming 

Goley, Margaret Manila N Livingston ^ ?i? 

Golike, Esther P Madison Beth. 

Gooch, Mary Esther B St. Clair Bellev 

Goodheart, Mrs. Stella K McLean Non 

Gould, Mrs. Jessie L Macon •••• H^ca 



Grey, Olive Agnes M Iroquois Ashk 

Griggs, Edith Katherine K McLean J^o" 

Grigsby, Sadie Ann L Marion t. ^w 

Groves, Gladys Anna M (Indiana) c-!i. 

Gust, Lena M L Champaign a Q^ 

Gust, Rose E K Champaign i^icu 

Guttery, Waneta Marie A Logan v-„a^^, 

Hack, Barbara K Pike KindeA 

Hageboeck, Leona Graf K Bureau i»SKiJ 

Hahn, Christine K Livingston ■L'wi 

Halkyard, Marguerite B Will rCV'^Jrv 

^all, Annas Bess P Cass ^S-wfS 

Hall, Esther Ernestine .P Macoupin ^ Knn 

Hall, Muriel Alice M McLean ^O" 



Illinois State Normal University 143 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

fall Nelle Viola K Lawrence Lawrenceville 

'anner, Lola Irene M Logan Fancy Prairie 

arbert, Ola Frances N McLean Bloomington 

arper, Anna Belle B Douglas Newman 

arrison, Anna Sarah ..P Menard Fancy Prairie 

arrison, Ethel Marie P Menard Fancy Prairie 

atfield, Beulah B Scott Naples 

averfield, Mabel Agnes K Christian Assumption 

ayes, Teresa Coleta A Woodford El Paso 

ays, Edna Emogene N Fulton Canton 

ebert, Cecelia Mary B Christian Assumption 

efner, Kathryn H McLean Lexington 

ein, Mrs. Elizabeth ..G McLean Normal 

eller, Lottie K McLean Normal 

enderson, Mary Grace K McLean Bloomington 

endricks, Ava Eugenia K Fulton Ipava 

endrix, Edna Pearle K Piatt Bement 

enry, Marian Frances L Kankakee Kankakee 

erriott. Hazel May K McLean Normal 

erriott, Winifred Anna D McLean Normal 

eylin, Helen Lucile N Livingston Saunemm 

ickman, Eunice Marie M De Witt Wapella 

iggs, Lillian Gertrude L Peoria Trivoli 

ilty, Katherine Barbara M Livingston Saunemin 

ilty, Margaret Agatha P Livingston Saunemin 

odsdon, Louise P Whiteside Lyndon 

olmes, Dorothy E G-H Ford Melvin 

olyer, Myrtle Ruth M DeWitt Weldon 

omraon, Lora Elizabeth K Fulton Ipava 

ood, Feme Florence ...C Champaign Mahomet 

cod, Nelle Beatrice P Champaign Mahomet 

oopes, Edith A Fulton Ipava 

owe, Charlotte G McLean Bloomington' 

unt, Mary Kathryn B Fulton Ipava 

uston, Aletha D B McLean Cropsey 

utchens, Florence Ethel H Greene Whitehall! 

utches, Edna B Morgan Chapiii 

yde, Adelia Marie P Champaign Champaigo 

eland, Adelaide M Peoria Williamsfield 

eland, Leatha F L Peoria Laura 

ackson, Leila Elvina K La Salle Rutland 

irman, Lina Murle J Peoria Chillicothe 

sffers, Ruth Belle A Douglas Tuscola 

effries, Leota Bessie N McLean Bloomington 

snkins, Adelina Honor K Macon Decatur 

ensen, Anna Jensine M Livingston Saunemin 

-nsen, Mabel Anna N McLean Heyworth 

lohnson, Myrtle Olivea N Ford Paxton 

ones Eleanor K Macoupin Virderi' 

Dnes, Florence Louise C Will Wilmington 

ones, Mabel Elizabeth C Livingston Cornell' 

ones, Mary Eleanor K Macoupin Virden 

ones, Mary N Christian Edinburg: 

urgensen, Ena L Marshall Bradford 

:avanaugh, Marie Cecelia M Will Symerton 

ilearns, Nellie Gertrude A Champaign Urbana 

,:eefe, Alice Elizabeth N Will Symerton 

leller, Mae Elizabeth N Ford Gibson City 

teller, Edna May K Macon Harristown 

lelly, Ethel Lucile F Ford Paxton 

i^elly, Frances Kathryn B Verniilicn Danville 

ielly, Ruth Angeline K Ford Paxton 

Penney, Florence Irene N Ford Loda 

i^erchanfaut, Kathryn L McLean Saybrook 

[^erschner, Grace Katherine K McLean Normal 

jger, Ellen Owens L McLean Normal 

i'ildow, Rhoda Mae M Putnam Putnam 

kitchens, Dorothy G-H (Arkansas) Paragould 

Jneale, Laura K Ford Kempton 

ilneale, Pearle P Ford Kempton 

ilnobeloch, Anna Louise A McLean Bloomington 

Irughoff , Cora W L Logan San Jose 

.acey, Elva Mary L McLean Bloomington 

.acey, Lela Velma A Fulton Ipava 

angdon, Ethel Irene P McLean Holder 

/,ange, Lydia N Logan Hartsburg 

Urimore, Mae G Adams Plainville 



144 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUl'TY POSTOFFIS 

Larson, Anna Matilda • L McLean Normal 

Lawlor, Theresa L Will Johet 

Layton, Lois Elizabeth L Champaign Fisher 

Leech, Corinne J Lake Zion City 

Le^g Pansy Avis D Mason Mason City 

Lesse'g, Caroline DoUie P Calhoun Golden Eagle 

Le Sure Essie K Richland Olney 

Litchfield, Ethel Marie A Marshall Toluca 

Lloyd, Betty D McLean Bloommg^on 

Long, Kathryn Agnellus L Will Symerton 

LottinviUe, Florence Louise L Ford Kempton 

Loudon, Janet Elizabeth B McLean Bloommgton 

Ludw-ig, Maylon A Stephenson J^-^l"\\ 

Lytle, Manta Marie K Greene Whitehall 

McCauley, Vivian T A Vermilion Hoopeston 

McClure, Edna Anna K Tazevell Mackinaw 

MrClure; Lvlvon Land F McLean Bloommgton 

McCormick,' Mary Grace G-H McLean ^oi-mal 

McCue, Hazel Maurine N McLean Bloommgton 

McCune, Margaret K McLean Chenoa 

McDonald, Rosella A Livingston Pontoc 

McDowell, Chrissie Margaret K McLean ^ormai 

McGee, Harriet Evelyn : K Shelby -T^i^^r^'i'T' 

MacGilvray, Helen E H McLean Bloommgton 

McGinnis, Genevieve Lorraine N Kankakee ■ • . Campus 

McGraw, Ruth Anna M McLean Blooming on 

Mclntyre, Ethel Marie C Mercer Seaon 



McKenna, Eelle 



.p Ford Meh'in 



Sck[^?, Mae V.::::::::: l McLean Hudson 

McKown, Hazel Fern P Peoria c' ,S " 

McLaughlin, Madge C Sangamon SP™°f^ 

McMannis, Virginia May H La balle ^nllt.«X-l 

McManus, Mrs. Laura Frances C Madison .fh^n': 

Maikson, Hilma Elizabeth L Menard . ..mens 

Malonev Anna Mary P i-cLean ^^°T i^^?^ 

Martin,' Blanche ^ Moultne Su U . 

Mateer, Ellen H La Salle Rutl 

Mead, Fadelia Louise B Tazewell vu^!t 

Mette, Vida A Livingston •• Flanag 

Meye;, Marie K McLean . Bloommg^ 

Miller, Delia M. I*^ Cumberland 



Tok 

Miller, Helen Marguerite C Stark Tou' 

Miller, Mrs. Lena Rogers L Vermilion ^a^- 

Miller, Pearl Iris B St. Clair mnS^ 

Mitchell, Beulah Esther D McLean ^^°°"^\"S 

Molohon, Geneva Elizabeth B Sangamon ■hino,;w 

Moratz, Bernadine Amelia C McLean ^^°°'S; 

Mortimore, Flo Vera M Mci^ean ^^ou^ 

Moser, Flelen Rosalie -B Macon . Vv.iK- 



MouUon, Ruby 



,M Woodford Washbj: 

, Aj Will Manhattai 



Murdie, Zeta Jeannette :^ )\ lu rhVnriler\i 

Murphv, Hester Mae ••■H Cass_ Chandleni 

M:urphy, Marguerite G-H Moultrie r^sna Pari 

Murray, Ruth Ellen L Iroquois Cissna . Pari 

Nantz, Sophia Louise ^' Macoupin 



Carlinviir 



^^ T • Tv/r M Fnvpttp Bavle Cit^ 

H-. . '^-y\., ■■• ,. ? l;:'rZr. v-:::::;:;:;;;.;.:;;:;:;;.7i.rRo 



Nichols, Marion F A McLean 

Nickerson, Josephine L \ermilion Damn 

Nicol, Edith Margaret L Morgan . ^^oodsol 

Niess, Mmnie ^ ^t- ^-^^ir Carfiek 

Nolan, Zita Anna B La Sal e G-rheK 

Obermiller, Anna Cecelia A La Salle ^F^lmminC 

O'Brien, Margaret Mary L McLean ^^°°™ S 

O'Brien, Margaret Mary JN tord •• 

Oldaker, Ethel May J Logan ^^uam 

Ollis, Luella Irene L Logan ^e^o 

Olson, Hanna Claretta N Ford • Farmer Cif 

O'Neil, Marguerite Dewey C De Witt cimm- 

0-Neil, Florence N Livings on Ca^PJ; 

O'Neil, Stella N Livingston RanS 

Orendorff, Genevieve Esther N McLean Rando^P; 

Orman, Loma Hattie N Menard Attjrmir 

Paddock, Mrs. Flossie K McLean ^^^™ 

Palmer, Gertrude Margaret g Cnampaign -"P^j.^ 

Parks, Agnes Margaret B Will 



Illinois State Normal University 



145 



NAME SECTION 

I Patton, Edna Mabel L 

[ Peck, Ruth Scott B 

I Penner, Gladys Eloine I; 

Phillipp, Evalyn Victoria C 

; Phillips, Aline Louise A 

! Pilch, Maud B 

Pinchert, Lydia Maria J 

: Place, Marie Louise C 

! Pollard, Rena Claire G 

; Pond, Florence Mildred P 

''• Powell, Grace Amelia L 

Purl, Callie May K 

Quigg, Alberta P 

Quinlan, Josephine B 

\ Ralph, Frances Irene M 

Rathje, Hulda Dorothea C 

I Rawson, Helen McGregor K 

! Raycraft, Irene B 

I Read, lona B 

I Reed, Viola Marguerite K. 

: Rehner, Cecel Marie K 

i' Reichel, Bessie May Violet C 

i Reichel, Esther Leota F 

i Richter, Edna Helena B 

j Riley, Juha Marie K 

i Rithmiller, Mildred Belle J 

I Roberts, Capitola Alice L 

i Robinson, Mary L K 

Rock, Edna Glendolyn K 

Rockwell, Esther Winifred L 

Roe, Grace H 

Rohweder, Helen H 

Root, Susan Verne K. 

Rose, Isel Fern ^ 

Rosenberger, Martha Jane B 

Rosenow, Anna N 

Ruddy, NeUie •••K 

Ryburn, Hazel Elizabeth G-H 

1 Scheffler, Emma Alice B 

;' Schertz, Imo C 

Schlabach, Mildred K 

Schott, Laura M B 

Schulz, Marie W ^ 

Schurenian, Mabel Love I^ 

,, Schwab, Marie N 

Secor, Blanche L C 

I Secretan, Helen Bertha B 

f See, Aurora Thea Ola L 

Shaffer, Edythe Jane M 

Sbarp, Feme Lora I"^ 

Sharp, Frona A 

Sharp, Mary Gertrude B 

Sharp, Pearl Graham B 

Sherman, Mrs. Floy C 

; Shields, Fannie J 

I Shields, Naomi Elvira N 

I Shireman, Euliss Elva M 

Sics, Florence Elizabeth C 

Simpson, Mabel Williams L 

Sine, Elsie de G-H 

Singleton, Irene M 

Skinner, Elsie Ehzabeth >^ 

Slaughter, Minnie C B' 

Sloan, Ruby Eleanor <"» 

Smith, Elsie TIenriette B 

Smith, Josephine J 

Smith, Sylvia Edna K 

Snider, Venus Mildred H 

. Snow, Bearl Ethel A 

l Solmon, Mrs. Cora Mabel K 

i; Spicer, Velma Verna ^ 

^ Stalter, Lena Mae M 

Stangel, Julia Ethel A 

Stanger, Lois Reeves B 

Stansbury , Anna K 

Starling, Bernice E A 

Starr, Clara Catherine N 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Peoria Oak Hill 

Logan Atlanta 

McLean Bloomington 

Mason San Jose 

McLean Normal 

Fulton Astoria 

Will Monee 

Stephenson Freeport 

Warren Monmouth 

Menard Greenview 

Marshall Speer 

Green CarroUton 

Morgan Jacksonville 

Champaign Tolono 

Livingston Pontiac 

Will Beotone 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

Peoria Beoria 

Peoria Peoria 

Peoria Peoria 

Gallatin Ridgway 

Marshall Toluca 

Mason Forrest City 

Cook Kenilwortn 

DeWitt Farmer City 

McLean Bloomington 

La Salle Rutland 

Douglas Tuscola 

Brown Versailles 

Schuyler RushviUe 

Cass Beardstown 

Bureau Prniceton 

Vermilion Rankin 

McLean Heyworth 

Sangamon Springfield 

Ford Gibson City 

McLean Normal 

Kankakee Reddick 

McLean Danvers 

McLean Saybrook 

McLean Bloomington 

Greene CarroUton 

Peoria Peona 

Kankakee Herscher 

DeWitt V/eldon 

McDonough Blandinsville 

Ford Biper City 

(West Virginia) Meadow Bluff 

(West Virginia) Meadow Bluff 

Schuyler Rushville 

McLean Norma 

McLean Normal 

McLean . . , Bloomnigton 

St. Clair Belleville 

Marion Centralia 

Piatt Bement 

Will Symerton 

McLean Normal 

(Missouri) Marshall 

Scott Manchester 

Macon Topeka 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

(Indiana) Valparaiso 

Stark Wyoming 

Woodford Secor 

Macoupin Waggoner 

Livingston Flanagan 

Champaign Champaign 

McLean Norma 

McLean Normal 

McLean Bloomington 

(Vermont) South Londonderry 



146 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Statler, Leona Frances K McLean Chenoa 

Steers, Hazel Jeanette N Bureau Tampico 

Stevens, Mrs. Lulu Queen A McLean Normal 

Stocker, Alice J Madison Highland 

Stoltz, Rosella P N Ford Garber 

Stratton, Alice R J Marshall Toluca 

Stuart, Ruth Catherine H McLean Normal 

Sutherland, Trissie Anne K Lawrence Sumner 

Sutton, Lucile K La Salle Rutland 

Swallow, Nellie Martha N Ford Gibson City 

Sweet, Sarah Elton L Sangamon Springfield 

Talbot, Agnes Lucile M Macon Decatur 

Tavenner, Jennie Blanche G-H McLean McLean 

Taylor, Olive K Woodford Pana 

Teal, Edith Winifred G Macoupin Carlinville 

Teal, Ophelia Eliza G-H Macoupin Carlinville 

Tee, Vivienne Harriet G-H McLean Bloomington 

Thomas, Evelyn Katis N Brown Cooperstown 

Thomas, Nina L Brown Versailles 

Thompson, Helen Elizabeth H St. Clair East St. Louis 

Tobias, Grace May B McLean Normal 

Tortat, Eulalia Iva K McLean Normal 

Trovillion, Jeanne C Pope Golconda 

Troxel, Mary Louise K Piatt Cerro Gordo 

Tuggle, Gladys Ethel P De Witt Clinton 

Tuggle, Ruby Fern G De Witt Clinton 

Turner, Fannie Virginia B (Ohio) Zanesville 

Twomey, Margie K McLean Bloomington 

Vance, Agnes Margaret B McLean Danvers 

Vandervoort, Verna Marie A McLean Heyworth 

Vetter, Lorena Roberta K Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Victor, Edna Marie M McLean Normal 

Vogelbacher, Josephine A Ford Piper City 

Wabel, Gladys Mae N Bureau Princeton 

Wall, Theresa Cecelia L McLean Colfax 

Wallace, Ida L A Mason Havana 

Walton, Millie Emma B Mason Mason City 

Washburn, Clonie Gail D McLean Normal 

Wasson, Glenna A Fulton Fairview 

Watkins, Lucy Rybum G-H McLean Bloomington 

Webb, Maybelle Elsie C Christian Assumption 

Webster, Dorothy Faith G-H Fulton Vermont 

Welchlen, Maudella N McLean McLean 

Welte, Mary Margaret O Livingston Flanagan 

Werts, Frances Caroline L Woodford Eureka 

Wessel, Letha Jeanette P Iroquois Crescent City 

Westhoff, Margaret D McLean Normal 

Wheeler, Stella Mae A Johnson Vienna 

White, Ernestine S B Livingston Forrest 

White, Justina K McLean Bloomington 

Wilber, Mrs. Amy L L Brown Mt. Sterling 

Williamson, Helen C N McLean Bloomington 

Wilson, Clara B Kankakee Grant Park 

Wilson, Effie Mae H Peoria Dunlap 

Wilson, Hester M B Fulton Fairview 

Wilson, Mrs. Pearl P McLean -No^"^?j 

Winch, Marie Anna P Sangamon Springfield 

Winchell, Helen Lucile L McLean Normal 

Winchester, Zella Irene A Peoria Elmore 

Winkle, Nellie Feme M McLean Bloomington 

Winters, Verna La Delle M Livingston Saunemin 

Wiseman, Laura K Jasper Willow Hill 

Woll, Pansy Martha B Mason San Jose 

Worley, Cesta Olive M Sangamon lUiopoIis 

Wright, Jessie Marie B Douglas Newman 

Wright, Louise Gazelle L Mercer ,,^^t^^°" 

Wright, Nelle Elizabeth A McLean McLean 

Wright, Mrs. Samantha G-H McLean Bloomington 

WuUenwaber, Maude K McLean Bloomington 

Wyant, Leta Bernice K Henry Kewanee 

Wyllie, Marion Maude N Livingston Emington 

Wyne, Clarinda Jean K Fulton Vermont 

Yantiss, Gwendolene A Christian Moweaqua 

Yerkes, Lola K Shelby Moweaqua 

Yerkes, Neena K Shelby Moweaqua 

Young, Irnia Marguerite C McLean -^o™ 

Younl; Stella .... M Stark Toulon 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 147 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Youngblood, Mabel Clare O McLean .Normal 

Zeller, Elizabeth Anne G Morgan Alexander 

Zenor, Faye Marie L McLean ; Bloomington 

Zimmerman, Frances P Jasper Newton 

Zinn, Dorys Elizabeth C Livingston Flanagan 

Alexander, Eugene E J McLean Bloomington 

Arbogast, Francis Lee E McLean Saybrook 

Ault Arthur Ray E Kankakee Momence 

Austin, Clyde L Hamilton McLeansboro 

Ball, Leslie Hamilton K (Nebraska) Bridgeport 

Beckman, Fred Ferdinand K McLean Bloomington 

Benz, William A P Calhoun Nebo 

Bivin, Ray L K Macoupin ...Palmyra 

Blackmore, Raymond P Ford Gibson City 

Boughton, Roy P McLean Hudson 

Bowyer, Earl William K Piatt Bement 

Braden, Noah I Cass Beardstown 

Brown, George William K Greene Roodhouse 

Burdick, Robert Charles 1 Christian Stonmgton 

Burns, William W I Moultrie Sullivan 

Burtis, Royal V K McLean ?.^^^°" 

Bush, Louis J McLean Normal 

Cade, Carroll Columbus L Greene Patterson 

Campbell, Comer Clarence K Kane ^S^^j 

Carlson, Carl Frederick K Champaign 5^^" , 

Cavins, Warren C K McLean .Normal 

Chapman, Walter , P La Salle Marseilles 

Coffey, William McKinley P Douglas Oakland 

Condon, Robert S E McLean Bloomington 

Cooper, William CoUinson P Scott Manchester 

Cowser, William Keith N Peoria Mapleton 

Crouch, Carl I McLean Normal 

Deutsch, Harry Lincoln E McLean Bloomington 

Dowdall, Leven M E Greene CarroUton 

Dowell, Lloyd Foster E McLean Bloomington 

Dragoo, Alva William E McLean Normal 

Eaton, Samuel West J McLean Normal 

Eaton, Thomas Marion K McLean Normal 

Echols, Orphus Chester I Hamilton Dahlgren 

Eckart, Harold Crocker K McLean Bloomington 

Eisenbise, Allen K Carroll Mt. Carroll 

England, Albert Carleton P Piatt Monticello 

Epstein, Julius Livingston K McLean Bloomington 

Ernest, Robert Benjamin P Perry Swanwick 

Evans, George Tryner McLean Bloomington 

Farrell, Arthur Eugene K Adams fowler 

Feek, John Lester F Ford ^r \ 

Fehr, Harold Lester K McLean Normal 

Fiedler, Hugh A K McLean Bloomington 

Fisherkeller, John E McLean Bloomington 

Fleming, Floyd Veran I Fulton J'^V^ 

Foster, Dean Loren P McLean . . .■ Shirley 

Foster, James D K McLean Bloomington 

Froebe, Milton E P Logan San Jose 

Card, Addis L Wabash Allendale 

Garman, Arthur Lee J McLean Normal 

Geneva, William B K McLean Bloomington 

Gillis, Hallie Hadley E McLean Bloomington 

Golden, Robert Edwin N Tazewell Manito 

Goodwin, Freeman K La Salle ^'°"V^* 

Graham, John William K Putnam ^ McNabb 

Grider, Fred P Greene Athensville 

Grider, Glenn Adolphus P Greene Athensville 

Groble, John B L Hamilton Broughton 

Groff, Escoe M Lawrence Lawrenceville 

Grubb, Robert Willis ....K Adams h^^^^^, 

Hanson, Archie Michael E McLean Normal 

Hayes, John Leo K McLean Bloomington 

Hedrick, Leonard C L Edwards West Salem 

Higginson, Glenn V K Wabash Mt. Cannel 

Hileman, John E McLean Bloomington 

Hill, Omar Lowe I Moultrie Sullivan 

Hoierman, Paul I McLean Bloomington 

HoUimon, Lawrence P M McLean Bloomington 

Hoover, Ralph E E McLean Bloomington 

Howe, Ethan I McLean ^°^^ 

Hudion, Glenn Evans K Livingston Odell 



148 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECnON COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Huffington, Earl Stephens E McLean Normal 

Hunt, Donald M Peoria Peoria 

Ireland, Guy O Lawrence Bridgeport 

Johnson, Walter E McLean Chenoa 

Johnson, Warren I McLean Bloomington 

Jones, Fred A L St. Clair Lovejoy 

Jones, Kenneth K McLean Normal 

Justus, Paul Kilbride I Fulton Ipava 

Kelso, Raymond WilHam P McLean Bloomington 

Kerr, Grover William L Wayne Mt. Erie 

Kincaid, Lawrence E P Menard Athens 

Kinsella, Raymond P McLean Bloomington 

Kitchen, William D E McLean Bloomington 

Knecht, Herman Paul E McLean Normal 

Knuppel, Fred John M Mason '..'.'. Easton 

Koch, Merle Stanley N Adams Liberty 

Lambert, Verner I La Salle Tonica 

Langfeldt, Grover Henry E Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Lesseg, George Edward L Calhoun Golden Eagle 

Lewis, Loren K McLean Bloomington 

Liberty, Henry Lewis E Will Joliet 

Liggitt, Chester P McLean Norma! 

Little, John N La Salle Streator 

Livingston, Samuel W K Madison Edwardsville 

Lutz, Franklin Harold K McLean Bloomington 

McBride, Ralph E Warren Monmouth 

McKennie, Frank N Franklin Benton 

McKim, Chester Lincoln M Moultrie Bethany 

McLaren, Homer D K Vermilion Potomac 

McMurry, Francis C I McLean Bloomington 

Mahaffy, Erie Loomis J McLean Bloomington 

Main, Everett Hugh E Madison St. Joseph 

Marquis, Vincent B K McLean Bloomington 

Marsh, James B I Vermilion Venmilion Grove 

Masterson, Maurice Leroy K Douglas Garrett 

Mathis, Earl L Hamilton Broughton 

Meyer, Harold Frederick E McLean Lexington 

Miller, Edward George K Fulton Fairview 

Miller, Pearl Hobart K Cumberland Toledo 

Millman, Lewis L (England) London 

Minton, Irtis Othie E De Witt Clinton i 

Mobley, George L Logan Atlanta 

Moore, Wayne Stewart K McLean Normal 

Mueller, Emil A K Madison Granite City 

Murry, Wayne J K Christian Mt. Auburn 

Meyers, Harry L K Pike Barrs- 

Neff, Virgil K Tazewell Minier 

Newhauser, Rutherford E McLean Normal 

Nuttall, Walter H P Shelby Bethany 

O'Mara, James C K Tord Piper City 

Packard, Carroll D wight L McLean Normal 

Peak, Paul Reed K (Colorado) Denver 

Perrott, Raymond L Lawrence Clarence 

Perry, Abram B I McLean Bloomington 

Perry, Elbert Lawrence E ISIcLean Normal 

Petty, Joy I Lawrence Sumner 

Pfiffner, Floyd Marten K Peoria Peoria 

Pif er, Mortimer E P McLean Normal 

Plumer, Raymond Thomas M Peoria Brimfield 

Purl, Rutherford Keith E Greene Carrollton 

Randall, Leslie E McLean Normal 

Raycraft, Edward E McLean Bloomington 

Rebbe, Alfred E Randolph Chester 

Reichling, Walter N St. Clair Millstadt 

Ricketts, Edward F K Cook Chicago 

Riley, Michael Kelly K Gallatin Ridg^vay 

Ritter, Richard Floyd K McLean Normal 

Ritz, David Oliver K Peoria Edwards 

Rolley, Elias William K Putnam Magnolia 

Root, Charles H P Brown Versailles 

Rowley, William P P McLean Bloomington 

Ryan, Oliver Hubard I La Salle Tonica 

Sarff, Oran P Cass Virginia 

Schofield, Roy K Morgan Waverly 

Scott, Walter Jefferson K Montgomery Raymond 

Schick, Ralph Andrew L Lawrence St. Francisville 

Shotwell, Ray John L McLean Normal 



Illinois State Normal University 149 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

lith, Carl Ross I McLean Nonnal 

<ith, Carl Weeras K Logan Linco n 

<ith, George Ernest K Logan Lincoln 

'ith Paul V D McLean Bloomington 

5-aker, William Arthur L McLean ^-P/^^^ 

'ddard, John Colby K Mason Mason 

<rey John E De Witt Wapella 

ly ' Claire Franklin E McLean Normal 

r"v Glenn Norris E McLean Coltax 

ppen, Russell Golding E Will ^J^. 

'tman, Horton E E McLean .F°™^ 

'ubeneck, Ignatius D L Clark ^^^^J^^ 

'ubeneck, Otto Clark E Clark Marshall 

'eis, Raymond Carl E Tazewell Mimer 

■ieben, Ralph K Iroquois Loda 

' ompson, Charles Albert E McLean Saybrook 

'ompson, Robert Burns P St. Clair East St. Louis 

'rogmorton, Josiah N K Johnson New Burriside 

-c William G K Madison Godfrey 

.v.bridge, Ray E Macon Decatur 

n Petten, Franklin I McLean Bloomington 

ight, John Christopher I Kankakee Kankakee 

i^mer Joy I^ Lawrence bumner 

ifker ' Fred Woodward E Mason Mason City 

ilton, Henry L Macoupin 3^^^^^^ 

ishburn, Robert Glenn L McLean Normal 

itson, Myron T ^ E Christian Assumption 

-aver, Edwin Orin D McLean Bloomington 

;aver, Maurice J N Ford Loda 

'St Clyde I E Madison Edwardsville 

^lit'comb, Donald Dooley K McLean Bloomington 

hitt, Leslie K McLean Norma 

iemers, Tulius Edward : E Macoupin Bunker Hill 

ierman, Harry Wilson L La Salle Tomca 

ilber, Karl Allison L Lawrence Russellville 

iky, Grant Frank K Henry Kewanee 

iilley, Perry Homer I Putnam Granville 

:ood, Maurice Clyde P McLean r?%™'''' 

arley, Lewis Evans K Woodford LI pso 

orthington, Robert K Menard Petersburg 

aimerman, Frank L Macoupin Bunker HiU 






150 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS, 1915 



NAME COUNTY POSTOHI 

Absher, Genevieve Ford Sibl 

Adams, Mrs. Anita Jo Daviess Apple Riv i 

Adams, Lula Maude Peoria Elmwo( 

Ahne, Anna M St. Clair Milsta 

Ahrens, Ina C Livingston Od 

Aitken, Isabel Whiteside Fult( 

Albrant, Reta Gladys Lake Zion Ci' 

Albrecht, Elsie M Bureau Tiskih. 

Albright, Bemice McLean Norin 

Alcorn, Bessie H McLean Bloomingtc 

Alderson, Ruth Macoupin Vird 

Alexander, Mary L Iroquois Milfo. 

Alexander, Portia McLean Bloomingtc 

Alexander, Ruth Iroquois Goodwii 

Allen, Maud Lena Morgan Jacksonvil 

Allensworth, Myrtle Pulaski Olmstci 

Allison, Oma M Christian Assurapti( 

Alsbury, Mary Elizabeth Macon Mar( 

Alsop, Stella Maud Madison Soren 

Alteen, Myrtle May Tazewell Tremo 

Altman, Millicent Madison Collinsvil 

Anderson, Ellen S Iroquois Milfoi 

Anderson, Esther Johanna Iroquois Milfo; 

Anderson, Helen Irene Will Joli 

Anderson, Hulda La Salle Mendo 

Anderson, Irene Tazewell DelavE 

Anderson, Mary Belle McLean Hold 

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth Logan LincQ 

Anderson, Mattie B Logan Linco 

Andrews, Lura N Bureau Sheffie 

Antle, Grace Eleanor Sangamon Salisbu; 

Antle, Mary Belle Sangamon Farmingd^' 

Arbogast, Leila Rebecca DeWitt Farmer Of 

Arends, Anna M Ford Melvl 

Armstrong, Agnes R McLean Norm. 

Armstrong, Rutb Baylor McLean Nomv' 

Arrington, Bertha Adina Macon Mar( 

Arrington Edna Viola Macon MarC 

Augspurger, Pearl Eunice Ford Gibson Ci' 

Austin, Lois Merrill McLean Bloomingtc 

Axline, Jane Fulton Bryai 

Badger, Mrs. Grace M Morgan Jacksonvir' 

Bails, Martha Bemita Christian Morrisonvil 

Baine, Mary J McLean Bloomingtc 4 

Baird, Alma F Livingston Od^ 

Baird, Elizabeth Ruth McLean Norm. 

Baird, Hazelle Electa McLean Stanfo' 

Baird, Louise Emma McLean Norm- 

Baird, Mae Belle McLean Nonn- 

Baker, Ethel Tazewell Delavj. 

Baker, Feme McLean McLea 

Baker, Maude Douglas Newm? 

Baker, Stella La Salle Streati 

Balmer, Margaret Anna Richland Ohi( 

Bandy, Essie R Moultrie Lovingto 

Bangston, Edna Bureau Princeto 

Banks, Mrs. Margaret Macon Decatv 

Banks, Marie Livingston Pontia 

Barber, Flossie E La Salle Lostar 

Barbracke, Josephine Macoupin Mt. Oliv 

Barbracke, Mary Macoupin Mt. Oliv 

Bare, Mabel Whiteside Fulto 

Bamett, Bertha Brown Versaille 

Bamum, Elsie Logan Hartsbur 

Barr, Fern Marian Logan Atlant 

Bartelme, Margaret Louise Sangamon Springficl 

Bartels, Augusta Macoupin Mt. Oliv 

Bartlett, Edna V Montgomery Irvin 

Barth, Kathryn Woodford Minon 

Barton, Gladys McLean Norms 



Illinois State Normal University 151 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

T^, . T7 Piatt Mansfield 

SS; Geo^gfa Benonr::::::::::::::::::;:Scl'ean Mmower 

ites, Hattie L. 



.Tazewell Armington 



",,'^h Franrps Hazel Macoupin Modesto 

ZU Do'oSef H,--:;::;:::::.: mcl«,, ="°tSS 

>ar, Gcraldean %\.? Shamir 

' „' Anna Clmton bnauuc 

cker' EUJ l"::::: TazeweU Pekm 

:^h! TTazPl M Christian Assumption 

caer^Mt^eriVe':::::::::::::::..: Sangamon Spnnged 

;^£; Sr^^'^:::::::::::::::::::::::iSXS^ v:::;:::;:-^ 



^Prv Tane M .!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!'.!! Piatt Cerro Gordo 

eery, jane m. Lmtner 

3eri?'«i/\:::::::::::::::::::;::::::::|-ei> /^^n 

ell Eva, M »o"sl»s sSdoS 

!lL^^.^i"--:::;:::;:;:::::::::::::::;:Trw^ii--:::::::::::::::::::::^^ 



elsley, Bessie 

clt, Lillie Pemberton 



.McLean Saybrook 

.McLean Bloommgton 



enjamin Sadie M He'nry"" Annawan 

.ennet, Cora Eva La Salle La Salle 

ennett, Mabel L i-a ^aue 

lennington, Bemice Marshall St Elmo 

;cnnyhoff, Ruby FayeUe V;;;;.V;;;;;;.V;;; Ma'on'^S 

tenscoter, Mrs. Lola F ^^^^^ Pnha 

i-^-^on. ^^ft ™" ::::::::::::::::::::::'ManhSa5 

;ergan, Edith St Clair Caseyville 

(ergmann, Emma »t- L-iair Panola 

iernhardy, Margaret L Woodford ianola 

5erta, Thomasina Sangamon Latham 

|eshears, Fern Allison Logan V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V MnS 

evilhimer, Esther Tazeweil • ^°^°" 

kyer, Mary Anna iazeweu Ouincv 

,§!cile, Grace Adams V;;;;;.V.V.V.V.V.V NorS 

killings, Leta ^t Lexineton 

5ishop, Grace Marie ^^L^^^, pfSn 

3ishop Hazel M Tazewell i.'ii.-ii.'ii.'liiiii.-ia Saie 

^^'^' S^KiicJAli La Salle Grand Ridge 

Black, Mabel Isabel , , t -Nrnrmal 

Blackburn, Eunice Rebecca McLean DaSe 

Blackford, Nellie J Vermilion Blue Mound 

Blair, Effie A Macon VIrdner 

Blak^, Sadie A Grundy RociesteJ 

Blakely, Emma ShX .■.•.•;.•.•;.•.•:;::::. . "oluca 

Blazina, Elsie i^^ , II Tnlnra 

Blazina,Mary.Marcella Marsha i;::;::::::::: i]- ^Be leluie 

Blciker, Hedwig ^t. Uair Atwater 

Blevins, Lusettie Macoupin Proadllnds 

Block, Edyth Champaign T Uchfield 

Bockewitz, Louise Montgomery Philo 

Bocock, Hazel Champaign Hammond 

Bodamer, Desse E P att . SSun 

Boley, Bess g^^t^^^ oC 

Boley. Hattie Ann Richland Piper Sty 

Boma. Bertha Ford -.V.V.V.V.V;. . NorS 

Bond, Mildred C McLean McNabb 

Bonde, Inger M Putnam Vernon 

Bonnell, Myrtilla Fayette Fafrfield 

Book, Mabel Olivia Wayne AH^^ta 

Boosinger, Ella G 'iX Island .V.V.V.V.V.V.V. MolSt 

Booth, Grace E Rock isiana TrimwnnH 

Booth, L. Louella Peoria Ransom 

iBosley, Kathryn Veronica La Sale p^nnfrk 

Bossert, Ruth ..., Kankakee Mackinaw 

Boucher, Corinne Tazewell MeWh^ 

Boundy, Lottie Viola Ford TifZ^ 

Bowers, Mrs. Edith Logan itll^^r 

Bowman, Leona Florence Macon trJnTmV 

Bowman, Maude A Woodford Minonk 

Boyd, Mrs. Nina Hale Menard Tir.rnln 

Boyd, Odessa Elizabeth Logan \^^rZf\ 

Boyer, Zella Alfreda ^,*=4r ^ Carlock 

Bozarth, Ruth Woodford t Irnv 

Bracken, Ollie McLean ^e^y 



i52 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFI^ 

Bradley, Lena Jane Iroquois Loh. 

Bradley, Marie E Menard Gr;env?e,J 

Bradley, Ruth Piatt BeS 

Bradshaw, Ruth E Livingston pSrS 

Brand, Marjorie McLetn . NomS 

Brando, Catherine Putnam "■"GraS 

Branom, Bessie L Jersey JerSvv 

Bray, Eva Margaret De Witt CHnton 

Brendley, Ruth M Livingston '• dS 

Bressie, Lillie Janet Ford Robert! 

Bressie, Lorna McLean Bloomington 

Brian, Mary E Mason San lose 

Bridges Blanche Mason ' kason City 

Endwell, Laura May Macoupin Virden 

Brining, Mamie Letitia McLean Lerov 

Briscoe, Loretta A Grundy Minooka 

Brockhahn, Clara M St. Clair O'Fallon 

Brodt, Fronie Louise Woodford Eureka 

Brokaw, Dell Marie Henderson Stronghurst 

Brokaw, Marta Alletta Henderson Stronghurst 

Bronson, Mary Livingston Pontiac 

Brookhart, Edith Ethel Lawrence Lawrenceville 

Brown, Bernice McLean Bloomington 

Brown, Grace I Tazewell Morton 

Brown, Harriett Peoria Glasford 

Brown, Lettie M Tazewell Morton 

Browning, Mrs. Anna Macon Decatur 

Browning, Clio Macon Decatur 

Brubaker, Gail Montgomery Waggone- 

Brubeck, F. Marie Christian Edinbui 

Bruce, William Shirley May La Salle Ransoi 

Eruegscman, Calanthe Roberta Madison Alto- 

Eiummett, Oma E £dgar ' Chrismn 

Brunenmeyer, Luella F Tazewell .'.'.'." Washingto 

Bruno, Cora C Champaign Broadlanc, 

Bryant, Mrs. Emily F McLean Bloomrngto 

Buchanan, Ethel Tazewell Peki 

Buck, Marguerite Madison ....'..'.".'.'.'..".'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.'." Wood Rive 

Buck. Sarah Hazel De Witt Waynesvi! 

Buckingham, Minnie yAacon Oakle 

Buerkett, Katie Louisa Menard Athcr 

Eiiesing, Marguerite Ford '.".'.'.'" Gibson C:' 

Bumgarner, Irma M Putnam McXal ' 

Burgess, Blanche Lois Madison Cci: 

Burgess, Helen Leila Piatt 

Burnell, Hazel Mae Bureau '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '. '. '. ' 'Spring 

Burns, Mae Randolph Spar; 

Burr, Harriett Elon Xankakee Esse 

Burr, Henrietta Kankakee Esse-; 

Burroughs, NeUie Woodford El Paso 

Bushnell, Ruth Julia Greene Carrollton 

Busmg, Anna Ford Gibson Cit- 

Butler, Flazel Leona Sangamon Chathai; 

Butler, Vesta Macoupin Palmvr 

Buzard, Judith (Missouri) Kansas C'it- 

Byv,-ater, Frances E Adams Quinc- 

Cade, Ruth Hazel Champaign Penfielc 

Cameron, Maude Bureau Spring Vallc 

Campbell, Edna Woodford Minonk 

Cam.pbell, Ida Perry Pincknevviil; 

Campbell, Margaret Menard Tallul; 

Carberry, Margaret Mary Sangamon Springfiek 

Carlos, W. Lucy Kankakee Manteno 

Carmicharl, Edyth A Piatt Cerro Gordo 

Carpenter, Carrie M Marshall Henn- 

Carney, D. Esther Ford Siblev 

Carr, Clyde Cass Chandlerville 

Carroll, Helen Catherine Pike Pittsfield 

Carroll, Nellie St. Clair O'Fallon 

Carson, Louise TNebraska) Omaha 

Carson, Margaret Harlan Peoria Peoria 

Carter, Lillian Hazel Morgan Jacksonville 

Carver, Mrs. S. E Bond Greenville 

Caswell, Maude E Sangamon Lowder 

Cathcart, Jennie St. Clair Marissa 

Cattell, Jessie Marion Salem 

Caughey, Joy Crawford Robinson 



Illinois State Normal University 153 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

ughey, Ruby Helen Crawford Robinson 

ughlan, Mabel Pike Pittsfield 

lampion, D. Esther McLean Normal 

,aney, Ella Nora Montgomery Litchfield 

langnon, Bessie Kankakee St. Arme 

langnon, Edna M Kankakee St. Anne 

lapman, Bertha Champaign Long View 

lapman, Bessie Scott Bluffs 

lapman, Bird Christian Stonmgton 

lapman, Iva Champaign Long View 

lapman, Natalie Eleanor Greene White Hall 

larlton, Henrietta Tazewell Pekin 

laussee, Beatrice Montgomery Raymond 

leedle, Lillie Martha Woodford Matamora 

lenoweth, Gweneth Eleanor Brown Versailles 

lidester, Fafa Grundy Morris 

lildress, Beulah Irene Lawrence LawrenceviUe 

lism, Mabel Sarah Greene White Hall 

lism, Martha Celura Greene White Hall 

litwood, Jessie D Vermilion Oakwood 

iivington, Genevra Peoria Peoria 

iristensen, Julia Putnam Putnam 

iristians, Daisy Woodford Minonk 

iristie, Angelus McLean Bloomington 

iristie, Elizabeth McLean Bloomington 

abaugh, Lillian Clinton Carlyle 

aggett, Amy M McLean Lexington 

aggett, Louise McLean Lexington 

ampit, Mary Madoline Morgan Jacksonville 

ark, Essie Dale McLean Normal 

ark, Ethel Scott Manchester 

ark, Margaret W Grundy Coal City 

arke, Helen W Sangamon Springfield 

audon, Ruth Marie McLean Meadows 

aypool, Bonnie Vermilion Danville 

avton, Eula Grace Ford Kempton 

eary, Alice McLean Gridley 

cary, Ella M McLean Gridley 

eary, Marcella Elizabeth Woodford El Paso 

eary, Margaret McLean Gridley 

eary, Margaret K Kankakee Momence 

endenen, Alma Ruth Sangamon Illiopolis 

endenen, Ruth C McLean Normal 

ine, Helen E McLean Le Roy 

inton, Mae E Bureau Spring Valley 

)ady, Nellie Christian Pawnee 

:)burn, Mary M McLean McLean 

,)ffman, Mary Stella Marshall Lacon 

)law, Myrtle M Logan Atlanta 

albert, Avis Belle Fayette Hagarstown 

)le, H. Fay Macon Macon 

le, Nellie Piatt Monticello 

)leman, Frances Kane Aurora 

)llins, Ellen Mary Whiteside Tampico 

)Ilins, Lillian Myrtle Champaign Foosland 

mipton. Ivy M Edgar Scottland 

mdit, Lois A Champaign Dewey 

onfrey, Catherine La Salle La Salle 

)nkey, Grace M Vermilion Hoopeston 

imnell, Marguerite Regina Macoupin Bunker Hill 

;mnors, Marie Tazewell Pekin 

i)ok, Ruth A Macoupin Medora 

)ok, Ruth Mae McLean Danvers 

poper, Elsie Ethel McLean Normal 

')oper, Myrtle McLean Normal 

)oper, Ruth Alice McLean Normal 

ipe, Edith Elmira Jersey Grafton 

)pe, Ethel jersey Grafton 

)quilette, Mary Margaret McLean Normal 

liquilette, Tressa May Richland Olney 

)rder, Florence Victoria T .ake Zion City 

)rrigan, Nellye Sangamon New Berlin 

;)sby, Anna Elizabeth Logan Lincoln 

)Sgrove, Jennie La Salle Marseilles 

,)ss, Leila V McLean Arrowsmith 

Dstello, Mamie St. Clair East St. Louis 

niltas, Bessie Scott Winchester 



154 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPHS 

Cowan, Grace Helen McLean Normal 

Cowie, Marian , Macoupin Gillespie 

Craig, Eva Marie .. Douglas Newman 

Crewes, Frances McLean , Normal 

Crichton, Lillian Dewar McLean ' Towanda 

Crihfield, Helen Tazewell Miniei 

Crimm, Edith Pulaski Olmstead 

Crinigan, Katherine Champaign Ivesdale 

Crosby, Alene McLean Normal 

Crosby, Irene McLean Normal 

Croskey, Anna Alice McLean Le Roy 

Cross, Cassie Niswonger De Witt Welder 

Crouch, Zuma May McLean Normal 

Croughan, Lenora Wayne Rinard 

Crowell, O. Fern Morgari Waverly 

Crozier, Lucy St. Clair Lebanon 

Crum, Lena May De Witt Clinton 

Crusius, Edna McLean Lexington 

Cumming, Emma Clayton Marshall Sparland 

Cummings, Kathryn Hancock Dallas Citj 

Cunningham, Hilda June McLean Normal 

Curley, Nellie Teresa McLean Down; 

Curry, Olive Fay Sangamon Dawsor 

Cusick, Nora Peoria Edwards 

Dagon, Agnes Grundy Coal Cit> 

Daily, Edith M Franklin West Frankfort 

Dalrymplc, Dora Edgar Chrismar 

Danford, Alta M Christian Owanec 

Daniells, Louisa McLean Norma 

Daniels, Mabel McLean Bloomington 

Darnall, Estelle Livingston Fairbur, 

Darrah, Cora G Macoupin Medor- 

David, Bessie Emma McLean Norm 

David, Effie McLean Norm; 

Davidson, Genevieve Anne Woodford Eurck 

Davidson, Golda Madison Worde 

Davidson, Nora Eliza Woodford Eurek 

Davine, Adele A St. Clair East St. Lou 

Davis, Bessie Sangamon Springfie 

Davis, Elma Alberta McLean Bloomingtr 

Davis, Grace Madison Ti\ 

Davis, Kate Fulton Cub 

Davis, Lilly M Menard Tallui 

Davis, Mildred D Montgomery Litchfie 

Davison, Velma Elizabeth McLean Norm 

Dean, Alice B Lake Zion Ci: 

Dean, Ella Rose Pike Pittsfie' 

Dean, Jessie Bureau La Moil 

Deaton, Lutie Sangamon Springfielf 

DeCosta, Florence Sangamon Springfielr 

Deeke, Amanda M Will Beechei 

Deem, Eva Madison Altoi 

de Builbert, Juanita Woodford Low Poi'^ 

DeHaas, Minnie Blonde! Logan Beas- 

Dennis, Maude S McLean Norm 

Devereaux, Ruth A Ford Kemptr 

Dickerson, Gertrude Livingston Com 

Diefendorf, Daisy Knox Dougk 

Dillon, Abbie M Bureau Tiskily 

Dixon, Leta Ellen Calhoun Hard 

Dixon, Lillian A Calhoun Hard 

Dobson, Lula M Piatt Cerro Gor 

Dobson, Margaret Piatt Milmir 

Dodson, Christine McLean Bloommgt: 

Dodson, Dorothy Esther McLean Norn. 

Doerr, Amalia St. Clair East Caronder; 

Dohrs, Pearl Morgan \\avei. 

Dolph, Delia Vermilion Rank: 

Donahue, Clara Ford Culi>v 

Donahue, Irene Whiteside Tamp; 

Donelson, Nina A Tazewell Hoped.^ 

Doner, Alice A Moultrie Bethan; 

Donovan, Gertrude H Will Jo je' 

Donovan, Grace M. Will U, ^S}^^ 

Doody, Alice M Woodford El Pasc 

Doran, Ruth Piatt Hammonc 

Dotson, Grace McLean Le K05 



A 



Illinois State Normal University 155 

Itt NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

I4ll. Mrs. W. W ,pe Witt Clinton 



-die, Nellie -L^^an 



D 

D ty, Kathryn Emmer 

D le, Marie . 

D coll, Marie 



Lincoln 



McLean Bloomington 

.Stephenson Freeport 

Bureau Tiskilwa 



gah^5?ore.Mo.Ii= Macon ^Dec^u. 

)nticello 
Dir'juiia y McLean Normal 



:!-'?S ^f ^::::::::::::::::::::S :::::::::::::::::::::::::::;: mSS 



D 'Son, Laura Ellen 



nian Bridget Livingston Fairbury 

gfar Cora^Ann McLean Norrna^ 

D.bar, L. Blanche Henry Galva 

D.can. Louise Doug as V a grove 

Dican, Marie po^i^^,^ •••••• ^'^^^ ^P°!^ 

Dtcan, Mary M If t^^"^ Le R^ 

n,ian Daisv McLean i^e Koy 

gi',^'ESt'r..:::::::::::::: christian Mt. Aubum 

Dtn, Vema L .Kankakee Essex 

Cton. Alma ?i^.H;"------" West ' FraS 

Villa Grove 



D:an, DoraA Douglas Vina urove 

Dvcr Rosa E Peona • Hanna L.ity 

E-e,'Helen Bureau Prmcrton 



Est, Ruby Franklin West ^Frankfort 

Dan, Dora 
Eycr, Rosa E. 

Fin Anna M." ".'.'.'.*.'.*.'.'.*.'.*.*.'.'.'.'. '. La Salle ^^V'-^J^ 

IterbrSok, Pearl McLean ^^°Tob^S 

Ert, Laura May I^°'^o/: iS'u^-^me 

Frt Lucia Pearl St. Clair '-n ^^ifj'i! 

ieity, Bertha Blanche Douglas ^Z\}Zt 

Elingfield, Harriet Putnam Magnolia 

Els Bessie McLean xt i 

Els', Myrtus Verne McLean ••!;••, T?"l^i 

Evards, Mabel A Rock Island ^°'^J™ 

E.ards Pansy (Oklahoma) ^^tY..^ 

Erton,' Irene Marsha Lacon 

Erton, Winnie Marshall ^con 

E;enberger, Bertha Livingston -bV UUirTc^^l, 

E;er, Barbara McLean Bloomington 

fien, Esther E ^^^^^J^f?.'' Snar^ 

Ft Claire Randolph •• ^P^^a 

Ein; FaTe .:::..:::.:. Schuyler Rushvile 

Emberger, Myra P McLean V'uIlSi 

Is, Mary Bea Morgan Jacksonville 

E.S, Rachel Gwendolyn McLean p"?^ 

B, Mrs. Carrie Peoria c" .f^l!^ 

t Rose Marshall Sparland 

lerson, Edith A Christian ^^°"V"f°.'^ 

lery, Clara Irene De Witt ■f^.i^'l^' 

Imert, Agnes Marie Iroquois Uoi!?u^" 

Imons, Winifred Hancock rt Vt^I " 

Idemon, Maud Sangamon ^ /?:„J5 

Igland, Estella Macoupin ■•. ^"^f,^ 

Iglish, Anna Myrtle Morgan ^^^^^^^.S 

Iglish, Beth McLean No™al 

lochs, Maude (Iowa) Cieston 

Itler, Lena Emily Macon •tt VT^ 

Icridge, Florence Bell Piatt ^^'rrf°,^^ 

lergard, Lenor Iroquois Vt i!!:!?-^ 

Ims, Agnes Gertrude Montgomery N?°"i'! 

l^rett, Ruby Woodford Eu'-eka 

hy, Edna Elizabeth Woodford r- • ^^ ^ 

ling, Fae Wayne ^%'^it 

ling, Jennie Randolph ••••• ?Parta 

]gan Joanna McLean Bloomington 

llliay, Ruby Logan ^!."^?!" 

Ihev, Marguerite N Kankakee iiradiey 

Jir,'Mrs. Mina S Tazewell ^t i 

Hrfield, Belle McLean •• Nonral 

Imsworth, Mary Sangamon bpringneia 

:rr, Nina Marie Henry ^Z— l 

:icke. Anna Tazewell • • • • Minier 

:iton, Ruth McLean Bloomington 

:rry, Katherine R Rock Island Rock Is and 

:rry, Margaret B Rock Island Rock Is and 

therling, Mattie Bernice Iroquois bliciaon 

;lds, Marguerite Elizabeth Vermilion Hoopeston 



156 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME COUNTY 



POSTOFPI 



Fikenscher, Mrs. Amy Blanche Ford Gibson Cit 

Fillingham, Marie Livingston Pontia 

Fillingham, Verna Viola Livingston Pontic 

Finch Edna Fay Ford •;.•;;.•. Pa^' 

Fmk, Flora St. Clair O'Fallo 

Firth, Eveline Macoupin Gillesoi 

Firth, Gladys Tazewell Green Valle 

Fischer, Anna J St. Clair O'Fallc 

Fish, Lillian May Pike Bay]- 

Fisher, Carrie Uhland Adams Payso 

Fisher, Lucile Piatt .' iiammon 

Fisher, Mabel Sudbrink Sangamon IlHopoli 

Fitzpatrick, Mabel McLean Colia 

Fitzpatrick, Rose McLean Colfa 

Flanagan, Edith L Clinton Carl 

Fleming, Anna E Calhoun Hard 

Fleming, Bessie De Witt Weld 

Fleming, Elsie E Kankakee Hersc> 

Fleming, Elsie M Marshall Sparla 

Fleming, Lottie R McLean Bloomin-r 

Fleming, Luella Edith Vermilion Dam: 

Flutro, Adelle Iroquois MilV 

Flutro, Mildred Iroquois MiiV 

Foeller, Adel M St. Clair Belle-' 

Fogel, Violet Valora La Salle Grand Rid 

Foltz, Georgia Macon Decat 

Foltz, Marie Macon Decar 

Foote, Idah Frances Pike Pittsfi 

Forbes, Viola De Witt '...'..'.'.... Lar 

Ford, Carolyne M Tazewell Men 

Forister, Leora Madison HigMa 

Fort, Gustina McLean Bloomingtc, 

Fort, Stella McLean Bloomingtoi 

Fortune, Alice M St. Clair Caseyvill 

Forwood, Florence Madison Alto- 

Foskule, Grace Bertha McLean Bloomingtoi 

Foskule, Lena Louise McLean Bloomingtoi 

Fosseen, Elizabeth M Livingston Pontia. 

Foster, Beryl Lee Logan Atlanti 

Foster, Lelia McLean Nonna 

Foster, Myra Randolph SparttJ 

Foster, Nannie L Warren Monmoutll 

Foster, Valeria Franc Brown Versail^ 

Fculk, Fanchon Tempel Livingston Pontia. 

Fox, Esther M Peoria Alt 

Fox, Nellie May (Minnesota) Blue Eart: 

Fraker, Helen Josephine Shelby Shelbyvilli 

Fraley, Dollie Mae Christian Tavlorvill. 

Francoeur, Parnelle E Iroquois Watsek; 

Franzi, Alice Amelia Madison Collinsvill. 

Frary, Alberta Joslyn McLean Bloomingtoi 

Freehill, Clara Livingston Straw; 

Freeman, Amelia Juliette St. Clair East St. Loui 

Freeman, Eva Kathleen Jersey Grafto 

Freitag, Bessie Tazewell Minie 

Frey, Lydia Maj'me Livingston Gridle" 

Frintz, Martha Iroquois Cissna Pan 

Fristoe, Eva Marie Livingston Ponti:- 

Frye, Alma Litta Livingston Fairbv 

Frye, Marguerite Livingston Fairbi. 

Fuchs, Lily C St. Clair O'Fali 

Fuessley, Elizabeth Livingston Fairb : 

Fuessley, Etta Mabelle Livingston Fairb-; 

Fulton, Agnes Ruth Douglas Cama ; 

Funcke, Ida St. Clair Bellev; 

Furrow, Elizabeth Sangamon Roche-- 

Gaddis, Delia Fern Woodford Caric 

Gaddis, Ethel Pearl W^oodford Car'c 

Gaeschel, Anna St. Clair Caseyv: 

Gallegher, Charlotte V Logan Emc 

Galloway, Sarah Iroquois Hoopest 

Gambon, Carrie Edna McLean Blooming:: 

Gannon, Ruth E Marshall Tolucs 

Gantz, Edith Leora Marshall Wenona 

Gardner, Roberta Marshall Toluca 

Garlough, Zoe Irene McLean Norm. 

Garrett, Dorothy Mildred Vermilion Danv; 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 157 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

3asaway, Alice Elizabeth McLean Normal 

jasaway, Florence Irene McLean Normal 

3asaway, Stella Logan Latham 

3ascho, Lottie Esther Madison Godfrey 

3atchell, Ada M La Salle Ottawa 

3ates, Myrtle E Champaign Tolono 

Jebauer, Alma Madison Troy 

jce, Gladys Lorraine McLean Bloomington 

lehm, Cleo Maude Macon Macon 

3eip, Hazel Marie Champaign Champaign 

leip, Lula Maude Champaign Champaign 

Teissier, Marguerite St. Clair Belleville 

3ent, Evelyn May Madison Alton 

3errietts, Freda Sophia Mason Forrest City 

3esell, Clara McLean Bloomington 

3evman, Ruth Belle Woodford Low Point 

3higlieri, Frances Marshall Toluca 

3ibbs, Edith Marshall Toluca 

3ibeaut, Mae McLean Bloomington 

3ibson, Nettie Greene Carrollton 

Gibson, Helen Farabee McLean Bloomington 

3ibson, Ola Mae Morgan Franklin 

3ilbert, Imogene Bemice Iroquois Watseka 

Giles, Verla Knox Wataga 

3illan. Violet Tazewell Pekin 

Gillespie, Annie Rock Island Rock Island 

Gillespie, Madge Piatt Farmer City 

3ilmore, Lucile V.. Champaign Mahomet 

Silmore, Zella Marie McLean Saybrook 

Gingrich, Susie Livingston Pontiac 

Ginther, Minnie C Tazewell Pekin 

Gipson, Mary Vynettia Mason San Jose 

Givens, Faye McLean Heyworth 

Glasgov/, Elsie Grundy Braceville 

Glasgow, Mary McLean Normal 

Glass, Lena Alpha Warren Monmouth 

Gieespen, Stella A Christian Morrisonville 

Goad, Elinor Macoupin Carlinville 

Goddard, Gladys Genevieve Livingston Manville 

Goetz, Clara Lawrence Lawrenceville 

Golze, Lillian Alice Macon Decatur 

Gooch, Mary Esther St. Clair Belleville 

Goodheart, Mrs. Stella C McLean Bloomington 

Gordon, Helen Lucile Cass Virginia 

Gorenflo, Minnie Margaret Sangamon Riverton 

Gould, Helen McLean Le Roy 

Gould, Mrs. Je.ssie Macon Decatur 

Grafton, Clara Ford Piper City 

Graham, Etna E (Florida) Jacksonville 

Graham, Lillian Mary Rock Island Watertown 

Gray, Mabel De Witt Weldon 

Green, Marie Mitchell Edgar Christian 

iGreenman, Bessie Ford Paxton 

Greenawalt, Margaret Kankakee Momence 

Greeno, Alice Pike Kinderhook 

Greer, Viola Will Seneca 

Gregg, Grace Baker Gallatin Omaha 

Gregg, Nora Inez Gallatin Omaha 

Grey, Aline Olive Iroquois Askum 

Griffin, Margaret McLean Towanda 

Griffith, Cleora I Montgomery Sorento 

Griggs, Carolyn E McLean Normal 

Griggs, Marie Livingston Blackstone 

Grigsby, Sadie Ann Marion Centralia 

Grimm, Helen Marie Marshall Wenona 

Grimm, Wahneita Mae Marshall Wenona 

jGrob, Lorena Kankakee Reddick 

Grove, Hazel Woodford Metamora 

Groves, Priscilla Mason San Jose 

Guderjan, Elsie Marshall Varna 

Guede, Emma Mai Marshall Lacon 

Gunn, Frances La Salle La Salle 

Gutterv, Ruth Irene Logan Lincoln 

Guy, Elva St. Clair Belleville 

Gwinnup, Alice K Tazewell Delavan 

Haag, Delia Livingston Cullom 

flaag, Hazel Livingston Cullom 



158 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFHS 

Hagan, Eva Henry Kewanei 

iHageboeck, Leona Graf Bureau Tiskilwa 

Hahn, Mary Louise Livingston Dwight 

Haig, Emily J St. Clair Caseyville 

Haines, Nellie Sangamon Glenarm 

Hainline, Eva Beatrice Tazewell Armington 

Hainline, Margaret E Tazewell Minier 

Hall, Bessie Ingles Macon Niantic 

Hall, Bess M Montgomery Litchfield 

Hall, Eva Ellen Piatt Atwood 

Hall, Letha S Piatt Atwood 

Hall, Myrtle Iroquois Donovan 

Halliday, Mary Hazel McLean Bellflower 

Halliday, Stella McLean Bellflower 

Hamilton, Etta May Morgan Waverly 

Hamilton, Laura Alice Morgan Waverly 

Hamilton, Maude May Madison Troy 

Hamilton, Wilha May McLean Saybrook 

Hamman, Carrie Piatt Bement 

Hammerlund, Myrtle Olive Ford Paxton 

Hampton, Frances Willard Sangamon Mechanicsburg 

Hampton, Ruth Sangamon Mechanicsburg 

Hance, Hazel Livingston Campus 

Hanks, Dorothy Eliza Macon Decatur 

Hannah, Frances Piatt Monticello 

Hannah, Goldie Champaign Mahomet 

Hannon, Grace Josephine Henry Geneseo 

Hensen, Mabel Arline Grundy Gardner 

Hanson, Capitola Kankakee Momencc 

Hanson, Erma Fay McLean Bloomington 

Hanson, Frances McLean Normal 

Hanson, Nita McLean Bloomington 

Happe, Beatrice Sangamon Virden 

Harbert, Hazel Vermilion Hoopeston 

Hargitt, Daisy Dot McLean Normal 

Harkness, Vivian Piatt Mansfield 

Harper, Anna B Douglas Newman 

Harper, Hallie May Sangamon Glenarm 

Harper, Mary Crawford Robinson 

Harper, Vila Minerva Sangamon Glenarm 

Harringon, Virginia Montgomery Litchfield 

Harris, Emma Madison CoUinsville 

Harris, Jessie Bureau Princeton 

Harris, O. MoUie Morgan Pisgah 

Harris, Ruth Saline Carrier Mills 

Harrole, Ada Lawrence Lawrenceville 

Hart, Lela Ellen Morgan Waverly 

Hartin, Alice Evette Clay Xenia 

Hartman, Amelia Woodford Eureka 

Hartman, Louise Woodford Eureka 

Harvey, Susie La Salle Dana' 

Harwood, Hazel A Iroquois Watseka 

Harwood, Nellie M Iroquois Crescent City ; 

Hasel, Agnes Livingston Fairbury 

Hatfield, Cecile Scott Naples 

Hathaway, Theresa Corinne Vermilion Rossville 

Haven, Grace Shier De Witt Kenney \ 

Hawk, Sadie Woodford Washburn 

Hay, Katherine Isabel White Canni' 

Hayes, Josephine Elizabeth McLean Bloomington 

Hayes, Kathryn Alberta Scott Manchester 

Hays, Ruth Macoupin Gillespie 

Hazen, Rose Champaign Bondvillc 

Head, Nellie Blackburn Macoupin Carlinvillc 

Heaney, Blanche Mary Will Joliet 

Heavener, Dora Ford Piper City 

Hedgecock, Ruby Alice Sangamon Springfield 

Hefner, Esther Calhoun Batchtown 

Heidrich, Lelia M Edgar Chrisman 

Heiss, Golden M Sangamon Mechanicsburg 

Helgeland, Serena Paulina Ford Elliott 

Hemken, Ada Alice Madison Alton 

Henderson, Lucile Tazewell Hopedale 

Henderson, Mabel Ethel Will Johet 

Henderson, Mary Grace McLean •. Bloommgton 

Henderson, Stella Marie Tazewell Hopedale 

Hendrix, Edna Pearle Piatt Bement 



Illinois State Normal University 159 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Henneberry, Frances Marie Logan Elkhart 

Henninger, Louise McLean Bloomington 

Henrikson, Anna Marie Menard Athens 

Henry, Irene Cock Chicago 

Henry Nina McLean Bloomington 

Hensef, Litta McLean Bloomington 

Hercer, Florence Bureau ^P""f 7^^^^ 

Herndon, Rosa Frances Tazewell Mackinaw 

Herriott, ,HazeI May McLean Normal 

Hershey, Helen Marion Christian Stomngton 

Hickey, Josephine G Logan Burtonview 

Hiddleson, Vera Ford Cabery 

Higgins, Veronica La Salle ^^?^^,^ 

Higgs, Emma Elaine Peoria Trivoii 

Riles, Lana Madison Edwardsville 

Hill Etta McLean Bloomington 

Hill', Lottie F .....Hancock Hamilton 

Hill, Nellie De Witt 9."^^°" 

Hill, Trella Macon • .^ara^ 

Hiilig, Ernestine M Cass Virginia 

Hinderliter, Annabel Fulton Cuba 

Hines, Margaret Peoria 'tV. -V^""^ 

Hirschi, Amelia Madison Highlarid 

Hirst, Evan Lucille McLean Towanda 

Hitt, Mary W McLean Bloomington 

Hixson, Bemice Ellen Kankakee Bonfield 

Hoadley, Alice - Cook Chicago 

Hoag, Pearl Angeline La Salle beneca 

Hodges, Luna Lucile Clay l*iora 

Hodson, F. Louise Whiteside ^^7"^°.^ 

Hoehn, Ora Macoupin Gillespie 

Hoenig, Elsie A Madison iroy 

Hogan, Gertrude Christian ci, i5"^ 

Hogle, Lena Maie Iroquois -.^^^'^P,^ 

Holcombe, Alice M Lake Zion City 

Holcombe, Maud Lake Zion City 

Holden, Louise O Tazewell "^ ^^^^" 

Holland, Besse A Carroll Thomson 

Holland, Winnie J Carroll Thomson 

Hollandsworth, Sarah Marshall ^^^^°" 

Hollenbach, Blanche Cook Chicago 

Holley, Blanche McLean S°™ , 

Holley, Esther Martin McLean Normal 

Holloway, Marie Livingston Forrest 

Holman, Eunice Randolph .••• Chester 

iHolmes, Adelene De Witt Farmer City 

Holmes, Dorothy E Ford Melvm 

Holmes, Edith Iroquois \,^^^^^^ 

Holmes, Evelyn Belle Kankakee Momence 

Holmes, Frances Gertrude Kankakee Momence 

'Holmgren, Esther Henry %m^"^j 

Holt, Deffie Blanche Iroquois • , I^'ij 

Hoog, Ida Montgomery Litchheld 

Hoots, EHzabeth L Piatt Cerro Gordo 

.Hoover, Ruth I Moultrie Lovmgton 

Hopewell, Helen Gertrude Mason San Jose 

Hopkins, Ada G Macon Decatur 

Horner, Ethel St. Clair Lebanon 

Horrie, Doris Eylene Livingston Hanagan 

Houghton, Myrtle Tazewell Farmdale 

Howard, Florence H Adams ;, ^v^^^ 

iHowe, Eva Piatt ^^"^^?,r 

Howell, Minnie Schuyler Rushville 

IHudak, Julia V Will ••••: J^]^'^\ 

Hudson, Hazel Elizabeth Greene White Hall 

1 Hueni, Bertha Livingston Forrest 

Hucni, Marie Livingston Forrest 

Huffington, Fern McLean Normal 

i Huffman, Edith M Tazewell fekm 

;Hufford, Lois Irene Iroquois „m'1'u 

1 Hughes, Esther Montgomery Hillsboro 

j Hughes, Genevieve Kankakee St. Anne 

'Humphrey, Anabel McLean Normal 

Humphrey, Ethelyn D Iroquois Crescent City 

'Humphrey, Rose W McLean Normal 

Hunt, Alice Peoria Chillicothe 

Hunt, Irene La Salle Streator 



160 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



I 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Hunter, Mrs. Eda Macon Decatur 

Hutchens, Beulah A Greene White Hall 

Hutchens, Florence Ethel Greene White Hall 

Hyatt, Edith Greene White Hall 

Hyde, Marian A Champaign Rantoul 

Ireland, Inez Invaline Fayette Vera 

Ireland, Lottie Bureau Princeton 

Isenhour, Margaret De Witt Weldon 

Iverson, Maggie Livingston Cornell 

Jackson, Bemice Frances Will Sumerton 

Jackson, Oacle Genola Shelby Findlay 

Jacobs, Agnes Tazewell Pekia 

Jacobs, Emma Ethel McLean Bloomington 

Jacobs, Nellie S Marshall Lacon 

Jacobson, Clara Livingston Odell 

James, Eva Sangamon Rochester 

James, Maud E McLean Bloomington 

James, Florence Woodford Eureka 

Janssen, Ulricka Marie Tazewell Pekin 

Jarman, Pearl Peoria Chillicothe 

Jarrett, Helen Wood Adams Quincy 

Jarvis, Henrietta Norma Madison Troy 

Jeffrey, Ida B De Witt Clinton 

Jennings, Dora Woodford Eureka 

Jensen, Juliane K Kankakee Kankakee 

Jensen, Mabel Anna McLean Heywortii 

Jinings, Vera Viola Woodford Secor 

Johnson, Charlotte Peoria Elmwood 

Johnson, Esther Louise McLean Normal 

Johnson, Florence Katherine McLean Bloomington 

Johnson, Grace McLean Stanford 

Johnson, Hazel Peoria Trivoli 

Johnson, Jennie June McLean Elsworth 

Johnson, Laura Dorothy Ford Paxton 

Johnson, Marian March McLean Normal 

Johnson, May Madison Troy, 

Johnson, Muriel Ford Paxton | 

Johnson, Ruth Grundy Seneca | 

Johnson, Sadie C La Salle Oglesby^ 

Johnson, Verna J Tazewell Minier- 

Johnston, Edna M McLean Normal 

Johnston, Eini Martha Sangamon Illiopolis , 

Jones, Ethel Faye Cook Chicago^ 

Jones, Fern E Woodford Minonk 

Jones, Lucile Cumberland Toledo: 

Jones, Ora Elizabeth De Witt De Witt". 

Jones, Pearl Elizabeth McLean Towanda. 

Jones, Ruth Cass Ashland < 

Jones, Susie Woodford Secor 

Judd, Nellie Sangamon Dawson' 

Julien, E. Maude Iroquois Sheldon I 

Justus, Winifred Grace Fulton Ipava. 

Kamm, Leonie Madison Highland 

Karcher, Anna Marie McLean Normal 

Kasten, E. Margaret Macoupin Carlinville 

Kearns, Lula Montgomery Farmersville'^ 

Keefer, Bemice M Mason Mason City^ 

Keese, Frances A Montgomery Litchfield 

Kiefer, Katherine Clark Marshall 

Keightly, Almeda Frances Tazewell Armington 

Keightly, Laula T Tazewell Anningtoa 

Keiser, Lizzie Marion Centralia 

Keithly, Nina Sangamon Springfield 

Kelly, Anna Marie Will Joliet 

Kellv, Geneva Piatt Monticello 

Kelly, Lillie Marshall Toluca 

Kelly, Margaret Marshall Toluca 

Kelly, Prudence Greene Carrollton 

Kelly, Ruth A Ford Paxton 

Kendrick, Mae Logan Lincoln 

Kenley, Mabel Clay Clay City 

Kenned5% Blanche McLean Normal 

Kennerly, Ellen Christian Taylor\-iUe 

Keogh, Nora Mary McLean Bloommgton 

Kerchenfaut, Edith Ford Gibson City 

Kerchenfaut, Kathryn McLean Saybrook 

Kerschner, Cornelia Madison Glen Carbon 



Illinois State Normal University 



161 



NAME 

rn, Helen M 

:irrick, Marguerite ... 

"irrick, Ruth 

jrschner, Grace 

;rschner, Lide 

jtcham, Gertrude N. 

"jtcham, Mary E 

:ttell, Emily 

ttelkamp, Alma A. . 

ii, Cora M. 



POSTOFFIS 



COUNTY 

Peoria Peoria 

Woodford Washburn 

Woodford Minonk 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

Livingston Dwight 

Livingston Dwight 

Lake Zion City 

Tazewell Tremont 

Tazewell Pekin 

Mildred McLean Le Roy 

ger, Ellen Owens McLean Normal 

fey Marie Livingston Campus 

ilion, Nellie May M De Witt Wapella 

ng, Mabel Aime Wabash Mt. Carmel 

rchner, Marie L McLean Normal 

rchner, Virginia Lucile McLean Normal 

rk, Elizabeth Otellia Crawford Oblong 

ein, Emma Caroline St. Clair Waterloo 

emm, Edna Maye De Witt Midland City 

lapp, Ina Isabelle Woodford Washburn 

lobeloch, Anna Louise McLean Bloomington 

ludson, Genevieve Livingston Odell 

)epke, Emily Bureau La MoiUe 

)hrt, Mabel Kathem La Salle Seneca 

)llman, Clara Monica Rock Island Port Byron 

amer, Cordelia Logan Lincoln 

eider, Daisy Belle La Salle Tonica 

igbaum, Mildred Macon Decatur 

•uger, Lotta Lovena Douglas Areola 

lenneth, Esther Macoupin Mt. Olive 

fferty, Lulu E Vermilion Hoopeston 

ndram, Bessie Macon Decatur 

itndwehr, Estella Adams Quincy 

;.ne, Florence Elizabeth Kankakee Herscher 

i.Nier, Elsie Piatt Monticello 

iNier, Marie Piatt Monticello 

irimore, Edna Adams Plainville 

rkin, Anna McLean Towanda 

irrance, Nelle Marie Vermilion Vermilion Grove 

rrance, Olive Hattie Vermilion Vermilion Grove 

irson, Almeda Bureau Princeton 

irson, Anna Matilda McLean Normal 

iwin, Edna Madison Granite City 

iwlor, Theresa Margaret Will JoHet 

liwrence, Bessie Christian Pawnee 

iwson, Vena Frances Greene White Hall 

;ary. Jennie McLean Bloomington 

:athers, Gristle Macon Oakley 

■athers, Helen D Macon Oakley 

'.e, Marian Teresa Lake Zion City 

;ech, Corinne Lake Zion City 

;ever, Agnes Fayette Vandalia 

ionard, Maude M Macon Decatur 

iionhard, Zelma Cass Beardstown 

;sch, Adele Vermilion Danville 

"wis, Anna E Grundy Mazon 

,;wis, Hattie Will Peotone 

;wis, Maurine Livingston Fairbury 

iesch, Katherine Logan Latham 

ight. Vera Edgar Christian 

illy, Eva Clark Kankakee Momence 

inbarger, Edna Fryer Mason San Jose 

indsey, Clara Pearl Madison Madison 

indsey, Marie S Champaign Mahomet 

instrum, Myrtle Anna Christian Assumption 

ipnight, Florence Pauline Piatt Bement 

itchfield, Ruth Irene Marshall Toluca 

ockhart, Margaret Madison Alhambra 

ongman, Reba Marshall Lacon 

ook, Mabel N Peoria Peoria 

opossa, Zora Estel Christian Edinburg 

orenz, Edna J Madison Highland 

ottinville, Lilian Irene Ford Kempton 

ovejoy, Mabelle Champaign Rantoul 

owe, Sara Grundy, Braceville 

owry, Mary Loretta Champaign Long View 



162 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOml 

Lowry, Maude Elizabeth Douglas, Fairlani 

Lucas, Theresa Macoupin Girar^ 

Ludwig, Maylon M Stephenson Freepoi 

Lundeen, Mildred G McLean Bloomingto 

Lutyen, Helen Livingston Flanaga 

Lyerla, Ava Juanita Montgomery Irvin 

Lynch, Estella Ruby McLean Normj 

Lynch, Sophye Fiegenbaum Madison Edwardsvill 

Lyons, Mary Anna Woodford El Pas 

Lyons, Mary Aloysius Bureau Arlingto 

Lyons, Nelle M (Indiana) Ambi 

McAmis, Roby Christine Macon Decatf 

McBean, Jean Crawford Obion 

McCarty, Enda Ruth Sangamon Riverto 

McCauley, Vivian Vermilion Hoopesto: 

McCay, Helen L Logan Lincol 

McCleary, Helena Mabel Menard Greenvie\ 

McCluggage, Florence May Peoria Peori 

McConnell, Nelle Douglas Arcol 

McConnell, Zina Douglas Arcol 

McCord, Jennie McLean Nornic 

McCully, Ethelyn Marshall La Ros 

McCune, Margaret E McLean Cheno 

McDanold, Nelle Bond Greenvil: 

McDonald, Nellie Calhoun Hardi 

McDonald, Rosella Livingston Pontia 

McDonald, Vera Cook Oak Par 

McDonna, Marie A Peoria Princevili 

McDow, Rheba Madison Alto 

McDowell, Lucile Vermilion Hoopesto 

McGee, Harriet E Shelby Moweaqu 

MacGilvray, Helen E McLean Bloomingto 

McGinnis, Ethel Tazewell Tremor 

McGough, Ella Mary Logan Lincol 

McGrath, Mamie McLean Noriric 

McGraw, Anna McLean Bloomingto 

McGraw, Bessie McLean Bloomingtc 

McGraw, Cecil McLean Bloomingto 

McGreevy, Beatrice Pike Pleasant Hr 

McGuire, Julia A Macon Decati 

Mclntyre Viva McLean Normi 

McKean, Ruth Catherine Bureau Bradfor 

McKee, Marcia Sangamon Rochesti 

McKeighan, Pauline Stark Toulo 

McKenney, Lillian Mae Calhoun Golden Eagl 

McKibben, J. Mildred Knox Oneio 

McKinney, Sallie Givens Morgan Winchestt 

McKnight, Mrs. Elfriede Macoupin Carlinvill 

McKown, Hazel Fern Peoria Monic 

McLafiin, Esther M McLean Bloomingto 

McLauchlan, Blanche Will Jolie 

McLaughlin, Madge Sangamon Springfiel 

McLean, Anna Louise Macon Marr 

McMackin, Anna Margaret Marion Saki 

McMahon, Julia Iroquois Clifto 

McMannis, Virginia Mae Rock Island Rock Islan 

McManus, Mrs. Laura Frances Madison Trc 

McMillen, Geneva AUeen Piatt DeLan 

MacMillen, Jane Marion Central 

McMullen, Marie Menard Petersbui 

McNamar, Irene Franklin West Frankfoi 

McNaught, Edna Iroqfuois Onarg 

McTaggart, Margie Sangamon Divemo: 

McWhinnie, Agnes Macoupin Virde 

Machamer, Marie Whiteside Fulto; 

Mackey, Minnie May Warren Monmout 

Macy, Frayda McLean Norma 

Macy, Lucille McLean Norma 

Macy, Mabel Nadine Piatt Cerro Gord 

Maddox, Kittie Sangamon Chathat 

Maisch, Estella M St. Clair Caseyvi 

Makemson, Nellie Vermilion Danvill 

Malone, Blanche Elizabeth Randolph Cheste 

Malone, Mabel Woodford Metamor 

Maloney, Anna Mary McLean Bloomingtoi 

Maloy, Mary- Feme Logan Hartsbur 

Mammen, Marie Logan Emdei 



Illinois State Normal University 163 

KNAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

anchester, Margaret Ada McLean Normal 

anchester, Miriam Flora McLean Normal 

angon, Elizabeth Henry Kewanee 

angon, Nettie Henry Kewanee 

antle, Alice Ebba Madison X',.. ,y°^ 

antle, Lola J St. Clair ^J^^H°^ 

anus, Dora Logan Emden 

anus, Marie Louise Logan Emden 

arkham, Florence Sangamon Riverton 

arkland, Sara Helen Marshall Sparland 

arlatt, S. Katie Iroquois Milford 

arr, Belva Grace McLean Bloommgton 

arriott, Alma Elverta McLean Chenoa 

arshall, Anne La Salle Seneca 

arshall, Marie Elsie Tazewell Minier 

artin, Catherine A Vermilion Hoopeston 

artin, Florence Vermilion Hoopeston 

:artin, Frances G Will Braidwood 

:artin, Hazel Tazewell Delavaii 

artin, Jessie McLean Normal 

artin, Lucile M Lake Zion City 

:ason, Esther Louise McLean Bloommgton 

:ason, Luella Anna Grundy Mazon 

iassoglia, Madaline Mary Fulton Farmmgton 

^athemy, Mabel Macon Decatur 

[axfleld, Lucile C Macoupin Palmyra 

Layer, Edith Marie Morgan Jacksonville 

layer. Myrtle Madison Glen Carbon 

layo, Gertrude Edgar Redmon 

[eans, LaVema McLean Bloomington 

[egowen, Ruth Madison Alton 

[eihsner, Josephine Ida Bureau Walnut 

lercer, Ruth Marshall Henry 

[erchant, Cora McLean Normal 

[erritt, Louise Marshall Varna 

letz, Edna M Champaign ^^^^u 

letz, Grace Livingston ^^ ,1 

leyer, Stella M Livingston Cornell 

[ichael, May De Witt Farmer City 

[ichel, Emma Dorothea (Missouri) St. Louis 

[iddleton, Clare Frances Marion Sandoval 

[ikel, Eleanor Emeline McLean Bloomington 

[ikel, Lorene (Iowa) Webster City 

liller, Alta Marie Montgomery Nokomis 

Ciller, Bessie Carolyn Livingston Odell 

liller, Elva Madison Granite City 

filler, Emily Piatt Cook Chicago 

liller, Erline St. Clair Lebanon 

Tiller, Mrs. Irma Gerdes Tazewell Pekm 

liller, Janet B McLean Bloomington 

liller, Mabel McLean Danvers 

liller, Mae J (Kansas) Wellington 

liller, Margaret Edna Henderson Kirkwood 

liller. Marguerite McLean Bloommgton 

liller, Maurine De Witt Clinton 

liller, Mildred Livingston Pontiac 

liller, Sadie Florence Christian Owaneco 

nils, Lottie Mae Livingston Manville 

lilstead, Gladys Belle Livingston Chatsworth 

instead, Venah Beatrice McLean Normal 

lisener, Myrtle Fern Grundy : Mazon 

litchell, Ada Ruby Peoria Glasford 

litchell, Bculah Vernon Macoupin Virden 

litchell, Helen M Macoupin Virden 

loechel. Flora Tazewell Pekm 

jloffet, LaVerna Mason Mason City 

lonaghan, Mary Macoupin Gillespie 

lonroe, Fannie Saline Carrier Mills 

lonroe, Lena B Moultrie Sullivan 

iontgomery, Blanche La Salle Dana 

lontgomery, Ethel Emma Logan Atlanta 

Iontgomery, Irene De Witt Clinton 

loore, Mrs. Blanche Sutton McLean Normal 

loore, Delia Sears Scott Naples 

^oore, Leah McLean Normal 

loore, Maurine Douglas Newman 

lorgan, Dorothy Louise McLean Bloomington 



« 




164 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY 

Morgan, Mary .Henderson 

Morrison, Ethel Lynn Ford 

Morrison, Faye Ford 

Morrison, Minnie Bessie McLean 

Morton, Ouida Christian 

Moschel, Anna Tazewell 

Moser, Miriam Kane 

Moulton, Ruby May Woodford 

Mount, Maud Waldon Logan 

Mount, Nina Grace Logan 

Moxon, Elsie H Morgan 

Mueller, Anna C St. Clair 

Mueller, Vema McLean Bloomingtoi 

Mulador, Nell Kane Auror; 

Mullins, Bertha Inez Lawrence Lawrencevill 

Munch, Adah Mae De Witt Weldoi 

Munch, Mabel Gertrude De Witt Lam 

Munchenburg, Tressa Macon Decatu 

Murphy, Luella Tazewell Minie 

Murphy, Mabel MeLean Stanfon 

Murphy, Marie E. , Madison Altoi 

Murray, Dorothy McLean Norma 

Murray, Elizabeth Vermilion Hoopestoi 

Myers, Josephine Anita Tazewell Washingtoi 

Nafziger, Gusta E Tazewell Minie 

Nafziger, Wanita Tazewell Mackinav 

Nance, Edna Cook Harve 

Nantz, Sophia L Macoupin Carlinvill 

Nave, May Fayette Bayle Git 

Neal, Opal E McLean Lero; 

Neff, Gertrude Tazewell East Peori 

Neff, Margaret Bertha Tazewell Pekii 

Neill, Hazel Marshall La Ros 

Neisler, Stella Mabel Montgomery Hillsbori 

Nelson, Abbie Pearl Henry Genese. 

Nelson, Alma C Bureau Spring Valle; 

Nelson, Clara M Bureau Spring Valle 

Nelson, Eva Marie McLean Le Ro 

Nelson, Sylvia Livingston Cullor 

Nevin, Lottie Pearl St. Clair Mariss 

Nevins, Florence Helen McLean Bloomingtoi 

Newcomb, Vema Ford Gibson Cit; 

Newell. Pearl Iroquois Cissna Par' 

Newman, Ida Belle (Missouri) Bunceto 

Newton, Ruth M Woodford Metamor, 

Nickols, Bertha Sangamon Rocheste 

Nicol, Verl Mary McLean Cove: 

Niess, Minnie St. Clair Mascouta: 

Nix, Grace Evangeline Sangamon Springfiel< 

Nolan, Margaret La Salle Wenon 

Normile, Lucy Elizabeth McLean Bloomingtoi 

Norris, Ada May Marion Veron 

Norris, Ethel May Grundy BraceviU 

Norton, Verna Calhoun Neb 

Noteboom, Grace L Lake Zion Cit 

Novack, Rose C Putnam Granvil. 

Nyberg, Emma McLean Bloomingtc 

Oakes, Dorothy Alberta Macon Decatv 

Oakes, Mabel Macon Marc 

Obrecht, Ada Leona Kankakee Bonfiel 

O'Hem, Mary Peoria Peori, 

Oldaker, Ethel M Logan Atlant; 

Oldaker, Jessie Logan Atlant: 

Oldham, Mildred AUyne Christian MorrisonviU 

Oliver, Agnes Anna Will Peoton 

Oliver, Nella Frances McLean Le Ro- 

Olson, Esther Marie Logan Broadwel 

O'Neil, Elletta Marie McLean Bloomingtoi 

Opperman, Matilda Ida McLean Norma 

Orendorff, Alta E McLean Randolp 

Orr, Elaine Iroquois Danfortl 

Orr, Leatha Iroquois Danfortl 

Osbom, Esther Edith Sangamon Aubun 

Osenton, Edna Feme Sangamon Buffal< 

Ost, Mabel Elizabeth Vermilion Danvill 

Otto, Edna I Iroquois Watsek: 

Otto, Viola M McLean Norma 



Illinois State Normal University 165 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

wen, Nellie Violet McLean Normal 

xford, Frances Fannie Iroquois Martinton 

aimer, Frances A Macon Decatur 

apenhaus, Eva Tazewell Morton 

arker, Cordelia McLean Bloomington 

arker, Dolpha '. Warren Monmouth 

arkin. Bertha M Morgan Waverly 

arks, Gladys E Brown Mt. Sterling 

jrr, Eunice Piatt Cisco 

arr, Jessie Piatt Cisco 

arsons, Cecil Madison Granite City 

arsons, Vera Musetta Logan Lincoln 

artridge, Emma Randolph Chester 

atterson, Bemice Amber McLean Le Roy 

atterson, Edith Bureau Sheffield 

atterson, Elizabeth Henry Prophetstown 

itterson, Jessie Marie McLean Bloomington 

atterson, Margaret Bureau Sheffield 

atterson, Mayme Woodford Benson 

lugh, Myrta Grace Piatt De Land 

awson, Mary June Tazewell Delavan 

axton, Lola Pearl McLean Arrowsmith 

;abody, Irene Lucy Woodford Washburn 

;ak, Alma Ruth Morgan Jacksonville 

;ck, Estella McLean Chenoa 

:ck, Ruth Scott Logan Atlanta 

dfer. Norma Logan Beason 

jndergrast. Bertha Iroquois Cissna Park 

jnnington, Feme De Witt Clinton 

copies, Isabel Macon Decatur 

;rdue, Louise Ford Paxton 

2rrill, Lucille Tazewell Pekin 

;ters, Geneva Condon Cumberland Greenup 

iters, Mae Eileen Marion Sandoval 

-terson, Violet Luella Henry Cambridge 

2tty, Philena Margaret Lawrence Lawrenceville 

hilippi, Carolyne Tazewell Washington 

hillips, Willie Idella St. Clair East St. Louis 

ickens, Verna Alice Adams Plainville 

ierce, Minnie Mae Woodford El Paso 

ierce, Verna E Bureau Princeton 

ierson, Esther C Menard Petersburg 

ike, Agnes McLean Arrowsmith 

ike, Mary C McLean Arrowsmith 

iper, Edith Nanette Sangamon Chatham 

iittenger, Lola Ann Montgomery Nokomis 

lack. Lenora Alma Peoria Oak Hill 

latt, Bessie Myrtle McLean Bloomington 

bllard, Rena C Warren Monmouth 

Dllock, Lucy McLean Normal 

ond, Faytima A Sangamon Springfield 

3pe, Florence Franklin Benton 

orch, Zexa M Marshall ^ Minonk 

orter, Sara J Kankakee Chebanse 

otts, Ethel L McLean Normal 

btts, Katherine W McLean Normal 

Dundstone, Esther Alberta La Salle Grand Ridge 

owars, Beulah Anna Macoupin Palmyra 

Dwell, Blanche Mary Madison Collinsville 

Dwell, Cora Madison Collinsville 

Dwell, Grace Marshall Speer 

iDwell, Mona Lucille McLean Randolph 

Dwers, Gertrude Tazewell Pekin 

bwers, Mrs. Lucie Jenny Iroquois Chebanse 

ratt, Irene Orpha Henry Cambridge 

irewctt, Maude Marjorie Peoria Peoria 

rice, Cleta Viola Clinton Shattuc 

ricer, Ruth Champaign Mahomet 

Tingle, Helen McLean Normal 

ritchett, Mary Madison Troy 

robst, Bertha St. Clair New Athens 

robst, Elsie Elizabeth St. Clair Waterloo 

alien, Velma Myrtle Iroquois Watseka 

umphrey, Eunice Wells McLean Bloomington 

unke, Minnie Ford Elliott 

urdum, Ella Belle Ford Piper City 

iurdum, Ida Mae Ford Piper City 



il„ 



166 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY 1 

Purvines, Talvi Sangamon Pleasant P! 

Putnam, Kate Champaign Cham 

Putnam, Luella Edgerton McLean No: 

Pyatt, Bess Geraldine Morgan Jacksoni 

Quigley, Mabel St. Clair Belli 

Rabusch, Elizabeth La Salle La 

Rader, Maude M Madison Granite 

Radford, Golda Macoupin Scott 

Ralston, Christie Anna Ford Piper 

Ralston, Mildred McLean Lexin 

Ramp, Jennie Marshall 

Ramsey, Fay Ethyl Menard Green 

Randolph, Clara Tazewell Green V 

Randolph, Florence Gertrude Pope Golo 

Randolph, Mona Marie Pope Golo 

Rapp, Viola Monroe Colu 

Rasmusen, DuWana C Kankakee Momi 

Rau, Georgia Lee Christian Blue M 

Rawlings, Edith Y Shelby Fr 

Rav, Bemice Putnam Ma 

Ray, Katheryn Piatt Be: 

Ray, Stella Vermilion Dan' 

Raycraft, Phyllis McLean Bloomingb' 

Raymond, Eleanor Iroquois St. An: 

Raymond, Sara Ruth De Witt Clint( 

Real, Julia Magdalene Stark Bradfo 

Real, Johanna Mary Stark Bradfo 

Reed, Viola Marguerite McLean Bloomingti 

Reeder, Ruth Elizabeth Scott Winchest 

Rees, Vaneita May De Witt Clinti 

Reese, Bessie Grundy Bracevi 

Reeves, Blanche Nadine Cass Ashlai 

Reeves, Helena Pike Griggsvi 

Reeves, Luella Pike Griggsvi 

Reid, Hazel Elizabeth Vermilion Georgeto^ 

Reinhardt, Katherine Peoria Peoi 

Reinhart, Anna Marie Bureau Spring Vali 

Reitz, Nellie W Menard Petersbii 

Remster, Pearl Vermilion Hoopest 

Renshaw, Elizabeth McLean Norn 

Reynolds, Cora B Vermilion Vermilion Gro 

Reynolds, Effie E Ford Gibson C; 

Reynolds, Gladys Racine Greene Ka 

Reynolds, Ruth Lydia Cass Ashla. 

Rice, Belle Kankakee Momer 

Rice, Ruby Gwendolyn Shelby Shelbyvi 

Richards, Alice J Cook Oak Pa 

Richardson, Mabel Ella Christian Edmbu 

Richardson, Ruth Elizabeth Ogle Forrest 

Riddell, Irma Mae Marshall Sparla 

Ridge, Beth Woodford Mino' 

Riebschlager, Augusta Woodford Washbu 

Riebschlager, Edith A .Woodford Washbv 

Rieck, Cynthia McLean Norn 

Riel, Clara G Peoria Lav 

Riordan, Mary Jersey Graf. 

Roach, Kathleen Anne Macon ^^^\ 

Roach, Mary Margaret McLean Danv 

Roane, Wessie Jefferson Opdy 

Robbins, Mary McLean Bloommgt 

Roberta, Notie L Bureau Chei 

Roberts, Irene Tazewell Mackin: 

Roberts, Lucy E Montgomery Hillsb< 

Roberts, Marjorie Grundy ■^i^'i*" 

Robertson, Fay Montgomery Fillmc' 

Robinson, Etta W McLean ^'■'"°T,^?l'» 

Robinson, Lillian De Witt Weld 

Robinson, Marie Woodford • • • Eurc 

Robinson, Mary Loretta Cook ^.^""^°' 

Robinson, Sara E Woodford ^^^ m- 

Robinson, Sarah Greene CarroUt 

Rodgers, Blanche Douglas Atwo 

Rodgers, Stella Morgan • . Wave 

Rodman, Ethel McLean Blooming 

Rogers, Nellie Mae Knox e*^^K 

Rogers, Nina Irene McLean ^^ i« 

Rogers, Vesta Eleanor Peoria L)uiil» 



Illinois State Normal University 167 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

irer, Carta E La Salle Rutland 

ley, Minnie Belle Putnam Magnolia 

ley, Mrs. Margaret E Macon Decatur 

)d, Mrs. Elizabeth Woodford Minonk 

)p, Nellie LaFem Tazewell Washington 

er, Clara B Iroquois Oilman 

e, Matilda St. Clair Milstadt 

s, Mildred McLean Bloomington 

henberger, Ella Bureau Spring Valley 

ramel, Maud Ford Paxton 

ramel. Prudence Ford Paxton 

ve, Susie Frances JoDaviess Apple River 

viands, Ruth C McLean Lexington 

ker, Maybelle Livingston Cornell 

bel, Marguerite Jersey Grafton 

isell, Lillian E Cook Arlington Heights 

herford, Ruth Macoupin Girard 

_.n, Cephas Peoria Peoria 

.n, Mary C Bureau Tiskilwa 

)olt, Edna De Witt Kenney 

doris, Bessie Mabel ChamDaign Urbana 

ler, Clella Lewis McLean Normal 

ler, Lena Christian Grove City 

non, Anna Teresa McLean Bloomington 

ipen, Amelia Alberta Logan Emden 

ders, Esther Ford Roberts 

ders, Pearle Lena Logan Lincoln 

ford, Mrs. C. M McLean Normal 

gster, A. Josephine De Witt Farmer City 

p, Clara R Madison Troy 

rcliff, Neva Evelyn Peoria Glasford 

achtsiak, Bertha Adams Quincy 

achtziek, Myrtle Adams Quincy 

afer, Lillian C Rock Island Port Byron 

afer, Mary Elizabeth Rock Island Port Byron 

illing, Elsa Ernestine McLean Bloomington 

labach, Gladys McLean Normal 

labach, Mildred McLean Normal 

latter, Frieda Peoria Peoria 

lutius, Milema Henry Kewanee 

machtenberger, Gladys A Macon Decatur 

midt, Kate St. Clair Caseyville 

midt, Mabel G Pope Golconda 

neider, Gussie P Hancock Carthage 

ott, Grace St. Clair O'Fallon 

rader, Emma Logan Lincoln 

rocder, Christina Logan Lincoln 

Suck, Matilda Tazewell Washington 

Swab, Sophia Wilma McLean Bloomington 

Swiderski, Frances Marshall Toluca 

S field, Mrs. Addie McLean Carlock 

Stt, Ada M St. Clair O'Fallon 

Stt, Adah Livingston Pontiac 

Stt, Blanche E St. Clair O'Fallon 

Stt, Coaina Marie (Iowa) Davenport 

Stt, Zella May Morgan Jacksonville 

Svel, Helen Louise Livingston Saunemin 

Sville, Ruana Mason Easton 

Sor, Blanche Louise Greene Carrollton 

S, Aurora Thea Ola Kankakee Herscher 

Sd, Mary Ina Richland Olney 

Siel, Fern L Bureau Manlius 

S <:, Mabel Irene Jersey Grafton 

S z, Hazel Pearl McLean Normal 

Sards, Glenna lone De Witt Waynesville 

Scrs, Eunice Pauline Macoupin Carlinville 

Sibell, Bertha Sangamon Springfield 

Smour, Chlorinne McLean Bloomington 

S.fer, Fern Clinton Carlyle 

S fer, Marie Rosina Marshall Washburn 

Siffer, Edythe Janette De Witt Weldon 

Sirples, Dakota McLean Normal 

S w, Genevieve De Witt Clinton 

S.y, Eva Livingston Pontiac 

S a, Lizzie Thercssa Tazewell Hopedale 

S ehan, Lillian Margaret Morgan Jacksonville 

S ;ets, Laura Mac Logan Lincoln 



168 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



KAME COUNTY FOSTOFFI 

Shcnk, Josephine L Will ., Braidwooi 

Shepard, Mabel B Bureau Manliu 

Shepard, Mabel M Putnam Granvill 

Shepherd, Nanna Livingston Saunemi: 

Sherden, Mae Henry Cambridg 

Sheridan, Caroline La Salle Wenon 

Sherman, Mrs. Floy Bartlow Schuyler Rushvill 

Sherman, Jean Marion Sandova 

Sherrard, Helen Van Meter Piatt Mansfiel 

Shifflet, Mary Florence Logan Atlant 

Shipley, Lucile Macon Maro 

Shireman, Euliss E McLean Bloomingto 

Shick, Mrs. Lucile Wabash Browr 

Shissler, Naomi Louise Peoria Elmwoo 

Sholl, Julia Alberta Peoria Mapleto 

Short, Flossie Mason Easto 

Showers, Fannie Moultrie Bethan 

Shrier, Blanche Hancock La Harp 

Shuman, Helen Anna Woodford El Pas 

Shutt, Audrey May Macoupin Virde 

Shutt, Edith Pearl Macoupin McVe 

Shutt, Lola Alberta Macoupin Virde 

Shyvers, Floy Juanita Iroquois Danfort 

Sidwell, Bertha A Pike Neb 

Sidwell, Ruby Pike Neb 

Simkins, Josephine McLean Bloomingto: 

Simkins, Mae Bureau Arlingto 

Simms, Edna Charlotte Peoria Peori 

Simonds, Mary Lora Kankakee Momenc 

Simpson, Mabel Henderson Stronghurs 

Simpson, Mabel W Marion Centrali 

Sims, Etta M Morgan Rohrei 

Sine, M. Geraldine Piatt Beraenj 

Size, Anna McLean Bloomingto;! 

Skinner, Carrie G Knox Altoii] 

Slaten, Alberta Jersey Graftaj 

Slattery, Marguerite La Salle Senec^ 

Sleezer, Lillian Regina Ford Ellio', 

Sloan, Ada Marie Champaign Fisht 



Champaign Mahonw ' 

Macoupin Palmyrj 

Montgomery Pawnc | 

McLean Bloomingto 

McLean Bloomingto 

Logan Lined' 

De Witt Clinto: 

De Witt Clinto: 

Macoupin Brighto' 

Adams Quinc 

JoDaviess Galen 

Christian Edinbur 

Piatt Hammon 

De Witt De Wi 

Macon Decatu 

Cass Beardstow 

McLean Danve 

(Tennessee) Murphysboi 

Knox Gilso 

Macon DecatL 

Madison Trc 

Putnam Hennepii 

Mildred Marie St. Clair Freebur; 

Miriam Fulton Lewistow: 

M. Josephine Sangamon Brechenridg 

Nellie Marshall Wyomin 

Ruth Lavinia Woodford Eurek 

Sarah Adams Quinc 

Sylvia Edna McLean Norma 

Winifred Vera McLean Bloomingtoi 

Smitson, Nellie May McLean Norma 

Sneed, Clara F McLean Norma 

Snyder, Ina Fayette Vandah 

Soliday, Mabel Elizabeth Madison Wood Rive 

Sorrill, Lois Esther Adams Adam 

Sosamon, Bonnie Tazewell Mackmav 

Souders, Gladys Gertrude Piatt DeLanc 

Sowa, Loretta Theresa Tazewell Delavai 



Sloan, Edna M 

Sloan, Esther 

Sloman, Esther 

Slonaker, Leta Vivian .. 

Slown, Ruth Clara 

Small, Louise G 

Smallwood, Minnie L. .. 

Smith, Ada Mae 

Smith, Mrs. Alice 

Anna Amelia . . . . 

Anna Mary 

Bertha Marie . . . . 

Celestia 

Ethel 

Geneva 

Isabeth 

Kate B 

Mrs. Kate Parker 

Louise 

Mamie G 

Margaret Zoella . 

Maude Beatrice 



Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 



I Illinois State Normal University 169 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFHS 

angler, Ina Marguerite Woodford Washhum 

-^»^«. Anna De Witt lllllllllll.^^S^ 

)car, Leila Piatt Bement 

)elbring, Mrs. Charlotte McGinnis De Witt Wavnesville 

,erry, Alice Ruth Tazewell V.V.V;.. Allcntown 

)rague, Alberta Peoria Glasford 

)ringer, Mirniie Ruth McLean Stanford 

out, Lula B Livingston Pontiac 

acy Salhe May Morgan Jacksonville 

andley, Beatrice L Morgan Chanin 

andley, Muriel Hazel Morgan " ChaDin 

anger, Bernice Edla McLean " Normal 

anton Helen M Putnam .'.'."Hennepin 

ark, Annas PoV^^^s Atwood 

atler, Leona McLean Chenoa 

auffer, Mary Belle McLean ! . ! ! ! ! ! '. "SaybrSok 

ears, Hazel Jeanette Bureau Tamoico 

shfast, Nellie Monroe "* Hecker 

ehr. Edna Kathryn Kankakee *.'.*.'.'.*." Bonfield 

•phen, Elizabeth Vermilion Catlin 

evens, Lucy Alice Fulton "" Cuba 

-ward, Zella Henrietta Sangamon '.'."Spr'ingfield 

jwart, Edna May McLean Bloomington 

:wart, Elizabeth Jean Tazewell Tremont 

:wart, Eunice Woodford Minonk 

iwart, Goldye Christian Blue Mound 

lUman, Lenore Louise Tazewell Delavan 

iltz, Sarah E Cass Tallula 

™k"u ^^? ;;• ^^y^"'^ Vandalia 

nebakcr, Lottie Scott Naples 

''"'' ^if. Woodford Metamora 

Dcker, Alice Madison Highland 

ockcr, Cara Madison Hiihiand 

^Iff FHnf V.^Vl P°^ Williamsfield 

' Edna Pearl Lawrence St. Francisville 

Inf'Aur*" ^*=^^*" Normal 

^"<^' Alta, Bureau Mineral 

me, Bessie Pike Pittsfield 

'"ti' M 1?^ ^'''■^^" Mineral 

■atton, Nelle Macon Decatur 

,aube, Hilda Madison Alton 

oh. Marguerite Edgar Hume 

:ykcr Mary Elizabeth Tazewell Green Valley 

icland, Mathilda Ford Elliott 

I irgeon Leota De Witt '.'.'.V.'.V.'.'.*.*.*.'.*.'.' ' Clinton 

.hm, Jessie Isabel Menard Petersburg 

:. ^' J'^^^H^ S Sangamon Illiopolis 

.on, Beatrice Louise McLean Bloomington 

;ton. Bertha B Hancock Dallas City 

Uo"' iT^u Crawford Robinson 

; °"' ?<^'*^ ^ Sangamon Springfield 

'^IT.'^^ %lK^-'r{'' Sangamon Sprinifield 

.anson, Ebba Orina Ford ^ Paxton 

Janson, Esther Florence Ford Paxton 

: anson, Esther V Bureau '. .'.'.*. Tiskilwa 

anson Mabel Ford ....::...... .'.\:::::;:..Sxton 

LTa ^7* -ir-'V P'^« Cisco 

' !^ J v"* •P^^,^"k-;v McLean Farmer City 

^ gart,Verneil Elizabeth McLean Farmer Cit'y 

.ing Lilhan M. Mason Mason City 

'vlnr' Firi^"*'; M^^Lean Bloomington 

^yor, Ethel Maude McLean Le Roy 

'^ ' t;* ^^**. ^* Marshall Lacon 

;ylor. Marguerite Piatt Milminr 

:yior Winifred Feme Sam-on''::.'::.'::.':::::.'::::::::- sprinS 

'mus' li^'^T ^""'^^ Christian Assumption 

^-k^'AiTr^^ Stark Bradford 

^1„' T^^T^, ^ McLean Bloomington 



arp, J. Ila. 
;Omas, Elizabeth M. 



.Iroquois Milford 

Will Joliet 



>S;,fS^ace''M::::::::::::::::::::::::::5:5^ SSS 

^omSon' Ma?v "^""'^ ^""'^ :.:wSor'd'-:'.'.'.'.:'/.:'.'.'.'.::::'.::'.:'.:'.''Metamo"S 

ompson, Mary Livingston Cullom 



170 Annual Catalog and Course of Study _ 

NAME COXTNTY POSTOFFIS 

Thomley, Edna Etta ?>^T^ll Mackinaw 

Thumma, Anna Marie Marshall „f'i^^^9[d 

Tiffin, Genevieve Montgomery Wa\shville 

Tiffin, Lucile Montgomery Hillsboro 

Titus, Mary Elizabeth Henry oT'^^?^ 

Tobin, Mary B Bureau Sheffield 

Tolman, Mazie Henry Galva 

Tompkins, Marie Opha Logan Middletown 

Toner, Margaret 1'^%;.:: Kinderhook 

Tcohiil, Loretta De Witt ?fZS5 

Towling, Genevia L.... Montgomery Litchfield 

Trainor, Emma Jasper n i T 

TroviUion, Mrs. Kate Pope S£f± 

Trullinger, Ruby Irene Effingham Altamont 

Turner, Amy G Fayette Brownstown 

Turner, Elizabeth Livingston Wrr f 

Turner, Katherine ^^^'^I'l' J v^ v^l 

Turner Lucile A Woodford El Paso 

Turner, Margaret i^^'^'^Fi?'' Wpn^S 

Turner Maurine Marshall il^nSnn 

Twomey, Mildred McLean ^^TaSe 

Ulbrich, Flora ^P^"^^^ wSnl. 

Umberger, Moray Agnes ^°r/.!?5f^ - TfA" 



Unz, Vema Arline 



.Kankakee Reddick 



Uphaus, Hazel Irene Macon Macon 

Valbert, Holley Jane Clay MnnHrello 

Valentine, Kathryne Piatt ^^^'l^n'r^ 

Vance, Agnes Margaret McLean Danve s 

Van Doren, Delia Macoupin Gillespie 

Van Geisen, Florence M Montgomery Pawnee 

Van Hoveln, Margaret Rosina Iroquois M;,.nr -?tv 

Van Loon, Gertrude Mason Mason v.ity 

\an Mete^, Edith (California) Banning 

Vannatta, Lila Macoupin Gillespie 

Van Petten, Mrs. Clara..... McLean •••.. \^o^2.x 

■vln Petten Wilha McLean Bloomington 

VaS wS, Alta De Witt ^'TecHur 

Vaught, Minnie B ^^^°^ „ Tduca 

Vespa, Anna Marshall LaGrtn4 

Vial, Margaret A Cook ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;. chrfsman 

Vice, Stella t'^^ ivrnrmai 

Victor, Marie Edna McLean Normal 

Virgin, E. Louise ?,f^\y'U En 

Vogel, Florence S Woodford Ben«m 

VoS Tobel, Anna Tazewell pV^'Swn 

Wagner, Pearl Catherine Cass Norma" 

wafkup, Eunice Earie McLea^ • y;;;;;;;;/;;;.;;;;;;- dS ™on 

Wall, Bessie J bangamon Hihsnn Citv 

Wallace, Frances M lord Brussels 

Wallendorf, Cordelia S^S^'"'' Bmsse 

Wallendorf, Irma Calhoun Brussels 



Walley, Edith Gray.., 



.Macon Decatur 



Walsh, Anna Lucretia Livingston nIw bTiS 

Walter, Eva M Sangamon New Ber m 

Walter, Jessie Lea Sangamon ^'^rquon 

Walters, Mrs. Carol Knox Greenville 

Ward, Florence M Bond •;;;;;;;;;:;;;;;. . "^.''f^:^ 

Ward, Leonora ^cott ^^^^^^ 

Warner, Ethel tr'^^ *. "Rriffhton 

Warr, Love Grace ^^'i^''^''' Peotone 

Warren, Celia Elizabeth Will • Peotone 

Warren, Dorothy E... La Salle .• Ogsb^ 



Warren, Irma Gertrude Will 

m, Clona Gail 

Inez Marguerite 

Veronica ■ 

Mrs. Eliza • 

Bertha Mae • 

Louise 

holt, Maud 

-' ' ■ '■ .vvouuiuiu "xr rmal 

Weedman, Elizabeth McLean ^.,-- ^,orin_^ 



Washburn, cionr^^::::::::::::::::: McLean Bioommg^n 

ez Marguerite 

jronica ■ 

:rs. Eliza 

tha Mae • 

lise 

Webber, Mkr^^wu::::::::::::::::::::::wo;;dfc;;d-;;:";;;:;;;;:;:^^ wa^bum 



Waters, Inez Marguerite Peoria ^"™^A^^ 

W^therholt, Maud .. ...""il^iiiiliiiiii^iiPiatt [[[I'.ll'.'.l'.l'.'.l'.'.'. ^,Atwood 



Watson, Mrs. Eliza Mason — ^ 

Watts, Bertha Mae S^J?''^'' .V.VMonticeUo 

Ijrot+e Tmnop riaiX .. . 



Waters, Veronica ^Marshall ••,••• ^^^°!! 

Watson, Mrs. Eli 

Watts, Bertha Ma 

Watts, Louise . . . 

Weatherholt, Mau 

Webber, Martha 

Weedman, Elizab( 

Weekly, Mrs. Ora 

Weese, Dorothy 

Weidinger, Eleam 

Weisenburger, Elsie '.Bureau *.'*.'.'.*'.'.''.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'."."........•• Bureau 



Watson, Mrs. Eliza ^Mason Mason p;ty 

Watts, Bertha Mae. 

Watts, Louise 

Weatherholt, Maud 

Webber, Martha Ar 

Weedman, Elizabeth 

Weekly, Mrs. Ora.. 

Weese, Dorothy Ve 

Weidinger, Eleanor *"a"h"^ — Quincy 



weekly, Mrs. Ora [[V.:::":.. McLean ^'°.°™c"S 

Weese, Dorothy Vernon White .;,•. , — ,_ 



[McLean • B^°°"';i!!li°!! 

dsie 

Welch, Doreene 



Illinois State Normal University 171 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

lelch, Lois McLean Bloomington 

i/elch, Marie U Sangamon Illiopolis 

7elsh, Mrs. Katherine H Knox Wataga 

7emken, Nellie Opal Greene White Hall 

/enzel, Aletha Madison Upper Alton 

/enzel, Lylas '. Madison Upper Alton 

/est, Susie Henry Cambridge 

/estbrooke, Daisy O St. Clair East St. Louis 

V'etzel, Elsie Amelia Wabash Mt. Carmel 

/etzel, Naoma Logan Lincoln 

t'halen, Agnes Marie Livingston Pontiac 

7halen, Irene Macoupin Girard 

/heeler, Annabella McLean Normal 

/heeler, Lillie Marie Macoupin Carlinville 

/heeler, Stella Johnson Vienna 

/heeling, Katherine C Henderson Stronghurst 

/heeling, Maude Pike Detroit 

t'hite, Alice Agnes Sangamon Auburn 

i^hite, Clara I Kankakee Essex 

^hite, Frances Sangamon New Berlin 

Vhite, Gertrude R McLean Bloomington 

i^hite, Kate Alice Kankakee Essex 

Vhitecraft, Cleantha Agnes McLean Le Roy 

Whitehead, Elizabeth May Mason Easton 

Vhitlock, Essie Lovell Marion Centralia 

V'hitlock, Geneva L Macon Decatur 

Vhitlock, Myrtle Jeanette Montgomery Irving 

Vhitmore, Ivy Naomi Montgomery Nokomis 

Viiitwood, May McLean Bloomington 

Viddows, Nellie Douglas Newman 

Viechert, Esther St. Clair Belleville 

Vightman, Gertrude McLean Ellsworth 

Vikoff, Bernice Macon Maroa 

Vildy, Charlotte A St. Clair Dupo 

Viley, Ruth McLean Normal 

Vilkinson, Irma B La Salle Ransom 

Villard, Ella Schuyler Rushville 

Villey, Olive Lucille Putnam McNabb 

Villiams, Dora Elizabeth St. Clair Marissa 

Villiams, Lela Greene Kane 

Villiams, Lillian Logan Lincoln 

Villiams, Mabel Sangamon Divemon 

,Villiams, Maude La Salle Tonica 

A^ilHamson, Merle Peoria Trivoli 

A^ilson, Alice M. G Bureau Kasbeer 

A^ilson, Cordelia Putnam McNabb 

Allison, Eileen Bureau Kasbeer 

/Vilson, Ella McLean Bloomington 

.Vilson, Ethel Woodford Eureka 

vVilson, Gertrude Maude Cumberland Neoga 

Wilson, Grayce Mildred Macoupin - Girard 

A^ilson, Lena Velma Morgan Murrayville 

A'ilson, Mary St. Clair Belleville 

Wiltz, Lucile Woodford Minonk 

A^inchester, Zella Peoria Elmore 

/i^inkelmann, Sophia St. Clair Belleville 

^Vinkler, Cecil May Woodford Metamora 

*A^inter, Gladys F Pike Pleasant Hill 

Winter, Grace Pike Pleasant Hill 

Winter, Ruby Pike Pleasant Hill 

Winterbottom, Lillian Grundy Morris 

Wolfe, Edna Ruth Piatt Monticello 

Wolk, Leonora Aldine Woodford El Paso 

Wollerman, Ruth Louise Montgomery Fillmore 

Woods, Frances Randolph Chester 

Woods, Morine Leota Madison Edwardsville 

Wooley, Naomi Ruth La Salle Lostant 

Woolston, Mary Alice Montgomery Nokomis 

Wooters, Mahala Christian Edinburg 

Workman, Grace Nita Sangamon Springfield 

Worley, Alta May Sangamon Illiopolis 

Writer, Vienna Mary Iroquois Chebanse 

Wurtz, Mary S Will Joliet 

Yearsley, Gertrude S Bureau Spring Valley 

Yeck, Lavina Emily Woodford Roanoke 

Yoder, Mae McLean Meadows 

Young, Mrs. Edna E La Salle Rutland 



172 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Youtz, Myrtle ?/'i^°''^ ^^ ^l"?' 

Zaugg, Rosalie Alicia Madison Alton 

Zimmerman, Alyda J^^Z NewtoS 

Zimmerman, Frances If^^rU; BelWUe 

Zink, Viola Elizabeth ^K^^^'"^ Nn,^il 

Zook Gladys Mae. McLean Normal 



Adams, Walter Scott. 
Akeman, Emory M... 
Alexander, Eugene E. 
Alkire, Miles 



Allan, Bruce Ernest.. 
Allan, William David. 

Allen, Carl E 

Alsop, Thomas V. 



.Lake Antioch 

.Christian Stonington 

.McLean Bloommgton 

.Vermilion Hoopeston 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Normal 

.Williamson Marion 

.Montgomery Coffeen 



Angelo, Vernon G .::::::::::::::: Macoupin , Palmyra 

Antle, Russell J... 
Arseneau, Stanislas 
Ashmore, George C 



Antle, Russell J. Sangamon Springfidd 



Anue, J^usseu j. Troouois Beaverville 

Arseneau, Stanislas ^-^^Za Olnev 

Ashmore, George c R^chiajd ••••;;;;:;;;;:::;;:::::::Mt; ' vS 

Atkinson, Harry G.....^.^.. —SSeS :.::..:..::: Armington 

Gibson City 

Austin. Cecil ^^••■■••••■"■•"•-•-■•■■••"-f^^^^^^^^ 

.Macoupin CarlinviUe 

Earr-ere. Wllloughby E CMstian ^Owaneco 



Atteberry. Jasper Lawrenii:::::::::.. Tazewell cfhSi"!"!? 

isr'!!ecii^'™"'''"°----:::::::::;:::::Ha-n;» 
&Xf/p:!:::::::::::::::::::::::::::MaSS..... carunvuie 



Batterton, Estil Menard Pe.er*^rg 

Beck, G. Hermann ^^- '-^^^F <;rr.ttvil1p 

Berryman, orus Kenneth ^Si^ry':\::v:v::::::::v^'Y-^^^^ 

S^S'Tav™'"' :::::::::::MSpTn^.. .:..:: paimyra 

Bivm, Kay L Mason Topeka 

Blackmship, Bane St Qair Lebanon 

Boggy, Horace E 5.S- J^*^ ^ Olnpv 

Bofey!' Arthur William R^c^and ::::•.::•.•.:•.•.::::' DaSlilll 

BoUa, Ernest Gordon Xnu^ as l!::.... Hindsboro ■ 

Bower, Lyman Pace Beardstown " 

Braden, Noah .....yv. St Clair New Athens 

Bradenburger, Friedolm SVinSon Saunemin M 

Braun, Edward J. ..^... Effingh^ .•.:;•.■.: ....:... Altamont •■ 

.Greene ^^°<'d^°TT?n 



Braun, isawara j. Fffinaham Altamont 

Brewbaker, Charles Earl cSene ... Roodhouse 

Brown, George William Macoi^Din Bunker Hill 

Bullman, Stephen Earl ^' SrH El Paso 

Bullock, Forest M Ganadn :::::::::::::' Equam? 

Bunker, W. Sam §■ i,'J^ Olney I 

Bunn, Arley Earl |;chknd ::::::::::::' TiskiS ' 

Burcky, Andrew C Moultrie .V.V..... Sullivan •: 

Butler, Charles Henry ^ u!!! Sullivan . 

Butler, Donald Malone Mou ne :::::::;:::: Suiiivan^ 

Butler, Edward Thomas ^?r^if, Neponsett 1 

Butler, Levi M S'wkt V.V. Kenney ^ 

asS^4a;.;•:::::::::::;:;:::::::::::::::S'•^^^^v^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Cavins, Joe L Xankakee St. Anne < 

Changnon, Dale Andrew vt^t Cerro Gordo 5 

Chapman, Bert L. MrTean * Bloomington J 

Clampett, Donald AHrmt Mendon ^ 

Clapper, Carl Mac^unin V.'. Bunker HilH 

Clements, George MacoupiS Bunker HilH 

Coatney, Ehner C MrDonoueh BlandinsviUe ■) 

Coddington, Forrest T. sX .V.V.V La Salle ,^ 

Confrey, Gus MrLean .V.' Bloomington t 

Cooke, Herbert Lee liiv Grafton : 

Cope, Clinton .....•.•.. MpT ean .V.V.V.V Normal : 

Courtwright, Jay Stewart MrlSn Normal 

Courtwright, Russell MrT^an Normal! 

Cox, Carroll Downey M^Tean '.! Normal: 

Crigler, Thomas Burr ^^t!^!J Normal: 

Crosby, Clifton Albert McLean .V.V.V.V..... Towanda i 

Curry, Loren Bernard PhriSan V. Taylorvillc 

Curtin, Frank fhS Tower Hill ^ 

Danneberger, Charles O MaroJoiA '.'.'.'.'•'■ H^^ick 

Dawson, Lee O ^ t^S Normal 

Deal, Roy Trowbridge ^ frH Athens 

Derry, Harrison Wiley Mr? eln .*.*.*.'.".*.*.*.'.'. . . Bloomington 

gSnrau?'l^"..:::::::::::::::::::::::HaSin-::;:::-.::: car.in,m. 



4 



Illinois State Normal University 173 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Dragoo, Alva William Douglas Murdock 

Drake, Lester V Macoupin Gillespie 

Ducey, Edwin Pike Pittsfield 

Du Vail, Dwight Leyster Piatt Monticello 

Ebert, Charles William Ford Roberts 

Eckhart, Eldon Woodford Benson 

Edwards, Charles Lee Marion Sandoval 

Eller, Walter Harrison Tazewell Peoria 

Ely, Charles P Peoria Pekin 

Ensminger, J. Lloyd Adams Lima 

Eusey, Samuel McLean Bloomington 

Fanning, Ira D Morgan Murrayville 

Farley, John E Sangamon Pawnee 

Famam, Herbert Mason Manito 

Fearheiley, Lewis G Lawrence Sumner 

Fehr, Harold Lester McLean Normal 

Felmley, John Benjamin McLean Normal 

Fenity, Paul William Greene Kane 

Fieker, Frederick C Macoupin Carlinville 

Fleming, Birney Fifer McLean Normal 

Follmer, Clifford Livingston Pontiac 

Ford, Kenneth B Greene Roodhouse 

Freeman, Harrison St. Clair East St. Louis 

Gaines, Byron S Pike Kinderhook 

Garman, Arthur Lee McLean NormaP. 

Garrison, G. Byron Pike Pearl 

Garst, Cassius A McLean Stanford 

Gasser, Alvin George St. Clair Waterlocs 

Gaumer, Everett Hale Vermilion Alvin. 

Gibbell, J. Paul Macoupin Girard 

Giberson, J. Robert Macoupin Carlinville 

Glossop, J. Ernest Scott Winchester 

Godwin, Marion Gunder Macon Decatur 

Gossman, Paul Charles Christian Pana 

Goodard, Clarence Edwards West Salem 

Gould, Oren W Morgan Meredosia 

Gray, Orley E McLean Danvers 

Green, Gerald Ray McLean Bloomington 

Griffith, Eric H Perry Tamaroa 

Griggs, Clarence Woodford Metamora 

Groskreutz, Henry (Minnesota) Fulda 

Grounds, Earl E Lawrence Lawrenceville 

Grounds, Oral Frank Lawrence St. Francisville 

Hacker, Linder William Pope Golconda 

Hallam, Chester C Livingston Saunemin 

Hamman, Noak O. A Piatt Bement 

Hanon, John Joseph Christian Morrisonville 

Hanon, Raymond Joseph Christian Morrisonville 

Harmon, Homer Noah Randolph Walsh 

Haip, John W Montgomery Hillsboro 

Harper, L. Lee Peoria Glasford 

Harr, Leonodus McLean Heyworth 

Harrell, Wilbum R White Omaha 

Hartin, Fred Clay Xenia 

Hassett, Joseph N Pike Pittsfield 

Hawver, Linley E Piatt Milmine 

Hawver, Paul L Macon Decatur 

Hemmer, William Anton St. Clair O'Fallon 

Henderson, N. C Hamilton McLeansboro 

Hendrickson, Lewis McLean Normal 

Henry, Ray Ned Piatt Hammond 

Herriott, Marion Champaign Mahomet 

Herrling, Charles St. Clair Millstadt 

Heyer, Henry Macoupin Shipman 

Hibbs, Adam Menard Oakford 

Hicks, J. Emer Iroquois Onarga 

Hiett, Jesse Earl Shelby Moweaqua 

Hildebrand, Harvey Thomas St Clair Millstadt 

Hinckle, Harold G Macoupin Palmyra 

Hodges, Earl Stevenson Vermilion Ridgefarm 

Holmes, Grover Edward Saline Harrisburg 

Horton, Cecil Oswell Macoupin Girard 

Holt, Henry Clay Iroquois Milford 

Hood, Vance Robert Champaign Mahomet 

Hooper, Hermon P Pike Pittsfield 

Hudgins, Bert Sangamon Glenarm 

Huffington, Herbert Leonard McLean Normal 



174 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



POSTOFns 



Huffmaster, Clifford William Shelby ^'LahlgSn 

Hughes, Cyrus Earl Ham on •••;;;;;;;;;•;;•;;;;;;;;;; gSK 

Hughes, Guy R. ge"ry Andover 

Hultgren, Nathamel Otto MadLn •.•..... Alton 

Hussong, 1. J P , Roberts 

Her, Merle E Hamilton" Broughton 

Irving, Wheeler Sand Parkersburg 

Jackson, Ervm Lawrence Sumne? 

Jackson, Euns Ford '.......... Gibson City 

Johnson, Grover E £,0^" Mapleton 

Johnson, John H MrT pan Normal 

Johnson, Joseph M rhH^tian Assumption 

Johnson, MarkL HamUton ■■■■;:: Broughton 

Johnson, Robert Roscoe Woodford Washburn 

Jolly, AUington fchr^lVr ./////:/.: . Brooklyn 

Jones, Fred A..... Ford Gibson City 

Jones, John William L>t Pan Normal 

Jones, Kenneth LivinSoA .V Flanagan 

Joosten, Ehme John FlvVne Vandalia 

Keeler, Otis vfln Monticello 

Kelly, Leon WalnP Cisne 

Kerr, Grover W.. Wayne ::::.: Mt. Erie 

Kerr, Herbert Thomas... MrT pL Normal 

Kershner, Gaston Conrad Mnnt^nmeVv '. Raymond 

Kershner, Karl Montgomery ^.^^ ^.^^ 

Kessler, D. Oman MrT ean .'.'." Norma! 

Kettering, Raymond Marion Sandova 

Kiefer, George L "Tefferson"' '.'.' Mt. Vernor 

King, Loman Tilman P^?tt La Place 

Kintner, Gay Andrew.. f vinKton '.'/.'. Chatswortl 

Koerner, Charles Albert I'lfn Emder 

Kramer, Arthur E HiB^" ;••;;• Mt. Zior 

Kruse, Harry G... Kounin Modestc 

Lambert, Elmer A... MacouSn Stauntoi 

Lancaster, Thomas Jesse MacoS ■"■■.'.■.. Brightoi 

Lansche, Elmer Arnold fnjan Buffalo Har 

Lanterman, Howard S M° t Pan .'.'.' Norma 

Lanthom, Melvin V Tawrence Sumne 

Lothrop, Levi Menard V.V.V.V Pctersbur 

Lawson, Lawrence J PnnP Golcond 

Lay, Chester Fred ^°P^ New Bumsid 

Lay. Ewell Tanner TpffprsoA .'.' Mt. Vemoi 

Leevy, Roy McLeln "■■.'.■.'. Bloomingto 

Lehman, Roland Julius M^rnSoin ^^^"^y' 

LeMarr, Paul E raihoun Golden Eagl 

Lesseg, George E vfl° Milto: 

Lester, Jesse D f^-^,^ Beeche 

Liberty, Henry L t , Qal'li. Streatc 

Little, John Ta7Pvvel Mono 

Litton, Thomas O. Madison .* Edwardsvil! 

Livingston, Samuel William TaJpwpH ^^^' 

Lohmann, Paul Kilpatnck Mrj Tan Bloomingto 

Lutz, Franklin q^neamon '.'.'• Springfiel 

McCall, Arthur B..... MontJ^m^r^ Fillmo. 

McCollum, Charles Alvy Montgomery • ^.^^ 

McConnell, J. Pearl MrT pan *.'.*.'.'.'. Norm^ 

McCord, Orville ....•••• ^neamori **.'. WiUiamsvil 

McCue, Thomas Edward f^^ft Atlan* 

McCuUough, Mark M Mpnard .".'.'.".' Greenvie 

McDonald, Jack Son Summu 

McLaren, Homer D c, 7-1^; Manss 

McManus, Merle L AHams ." ^^^ 

McNutt. Zenas V MrTpan Arrowsmit 

McReynolds,, A. Guy McLean ^^^^ 

McWherter, George MrTpan ^°™' 

Macy, Cecil Wengert McLean Kar 

Magee, Charles D..... Mrj pan Bloomingtc 

Mahaffev, Erie Loomis ^r!,^°,-„ Bunker Hi 

Marston;' Oliver Talmage MouUrie :::::::::.* Sulliva 

Martin, John Ernest WoodfTrd ^'""^^ 

Matuszewicz, George Macon ■■■.'..... Mt. Zic 

May, Fred R Maw" \\\ Redmc 

Mayo, William Emera Ldgax Adan 

Miller, Alfred Roy Adams y^ yxz 

Miller, Pearl Hobart MrLeaA .'. .N°^ 

MiUiken, Trent f^neiand) ^"'*' 

Millman, Lewis (England) 



Illinois State Normal University 175 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

kilstead, Parley P ^^^H^"^ ^ Normal 

Miner, Walter Barton Woodford ?^™ 

fl^obley, George Logan Atlanta 

lodglin, William Pleasant Johnson Grantsbiirg 

klontgomery, Ross Albert Logan t,^"^°^^ 

^oore, Benjamin C ^^^^^^ S"^ , 

^oore, Clifford Walter McLean ^°""^} 

vloore, George Floyd ^^J^^^° ;,V ^^^^^^ 

vloore Joe McLean Bloommgton 

vlorris, Johi^ *!!".! '.'.'. Sangamon Springfield 

Viorrison, Paul E Morgan Jacksonville 

bounce, Oscar Blaine Sangamon Pleasant Plains 

Vlulvaney, Walter Peona Brimfield 

^unsell, Roswell McLean Bloommgton 

Vlurdock, Leander Bartlett M^^°^ • ^^1^^^ 

Vlurray, Roy S. 



.Clinton Trenton 



Vlusick, Harry E Logan Lincoln 

Myers, Harold B Macon Decatur 

^^eisler, Harold E Montgomery Irving 

J^ewlin, John Vermilion Georgetown 

Nichols, George Elzie Piatt Monticello 

Neihart, William Marion Christian -n . f^ 

Norris, Ernest Norwood Marion Patoka 

Norris, Halvern Lamar Marion .Patoka 

Nutty, Carl A ,Tf^T/". Hopedale 

- . .Woodford Roanoke 



O'Brien, James ^^ . ^, 

O'Brien, Philip Thomas Champaign ..^°^°^.°^ 

Oltman, John Montgomery ^°,fT'^ 

Orr Harry Vermihon Allerton 

Owens, Harr^'james Macoupin Carlinville 

Packard, Dwight McLean Normal 

Paddock, Asa L McLean Bloommgton 

Park, Oscar B Logan Lincoln 

Parr, Lloyd Piatt ._ Cisco 

Pendergrast, Homer G Iroquois Donovan 

Pendry, Carroll S Vermilion O^^^'^* 

Pennington, Earl Lee De Witt Chnton 

Perry, Ray Brown Cooperstown 

Petty,' Malcolm Joy Lawrence Sumner 

Phillips, Roy N Clinton Trenton 

Pilotte, Harvy Alexis Iroquois Martinton 

Piper, George D Lawrence Sumner 

Porter, Henry Van Arsdall Tazewell Delavan 

Price, John Orlando Lawrence St. Francisyille 

Rabe, Fred Mason Forrest City 

Rachow, Tipmer Bond Reno 

Rafsnider, Lowell Bruce Macon Decatur 

Raney, Ralph Edward Christian Mornsonville 

Rayl Harry Champaign Broadlands 

Reav'ley, LesteV's Sangamon Riverton 

Rebbe, Alfred Randolph Chester 

Reece, Oliver Esbem Fayette Brownstown 

Reed, Ezra Pope Delwood 

Reeve, James Thomas Peoria BartonvUle 

Reeves, Everett Macon ,?., ^^T* 

Reichling, Frank D St. Clair Hi, ^^^* 

Reichling, Walter St. Clair Milstadt 

Reidy, Bernard McLean Normal 

Reitz, George H Christian Pana 

Rhodes, Elmer H Pike ;„,^'"^?t^ ,1 

Richbark, Stephen Douglas Piatt White Hal 

Rieck, Earl McLean Normal 

Ring, Eli Franklin Richland Noble 

Ritcher, George C Madison Vr } 

Ritz, David Oliver McLean Normal 

Roberts, Walter W Pulaski Mound City 

Robinson, Joseph Hugh Jackson Murphysboro 

Robison, William Jonas Piatt Monticello 

Rogers, Fred Virgil Macon Decatur 

Rose, Earl Churchman Calhoun Kampsville 

Rudolph, Clithroe Adelbert Ford ^r *°^^ 

Rust, Lawrence McLean -^o™^ 

Rust, Louis E Ford Sibley 

Rutherford, Edgar King Macoupin .••. Benla 

Ryan, Will J McHenry Woodstock 

Sayler, Willis O Iroquois Watscka 

Schlutius, Alfred Henry Kewanee 



176 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

.St. Clair New Athens 

.Marshall Henry 

.McLean Normal 



NAME 

Schmelzel, Edward Fred 

Schmidt, F. Louis 

Schneider, Henry Waterloo 

Schneider, Herman Adam St. Clair ^^^^"°° 

Schneider, Oscar Paul 

Schofield, Roy 

Schroen, Henry Lester 

Scotton, John L 

Seibel, Hurvy B 

Seidl, Ferdinand Walter 

Seitz, Harry William 



.McLean Normal 

.Morgan Wavcrly 

.Tazewell Washington 

.McLean Bloomington 

.McLean Bloomington 

.Woodford Benson 

.Marshall Henry 

.Lake Antioch 



.Macon Boody 



Sheehan, Fred M 

Sheffler, William W «;. p-„„^;<:„:ir» 

Shick, Ralph Andrew Lawrence St. Francisville 

iSS?'cSS^v:-:;::::::::::::::::::::::::::|iS„::::::::::::::"::::::::::--|3 

Simmons, Wesley M (Georgia) Eastman 

Sims, Russell 



Skinner, Doy W 

Smith, George A 

Smith, John Aaron ... 

Smith, Robert G 

Smith, Willard Carl .. 
Spangler, Arthur L. .. 

Sparks, John W. 

Spencer, Harold Finley 
Spires, Roy Leston ... 
Stahlheber, John Elmer 

Stauffer, Frank M fV_ 

Stoddard, John C 

Story, Glenn N 

Sturdivant, James Oscar 
Taylor, Arthur CuUen .. 
Thieben, Ralph Vcm ... 
Thompson, Jesse James 
Toole, Lawrence Edward 

Troth, John V 

Trowbridge, Ray O 

Tscentke, Herman L. 



.Macoupin Palmyra, 

, Livingston CuUom 

.Macoupin Brighton 

.Madison Troy 

.Greene White Hall 

Scott Winchester 

! Woodford Washburn 

.Montgomery Rosemond 

.Lake Wauconda 

,Will Lockport 

.Monroe Hecker 

Baylisj 

Henry Atkinson] 

McLean" Colfaxj 

Mercer .- •; Joy 

(Ohio) Cincinnatif 

Iroquois • • Loda j 

Woodford Roanoke j 

Woodford • ^«^^5l 

Peoria Elmwood^ 

Macon Decati 

Iroquois Crescent Cityi 

Underbring, Henry E. (Missouri) b^'^lkl 

Vance, Clarence Emory ve-'^j^n ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;. ""n^^^^ 

Vanneman Edgar ^ Qalr ... Summerfield 

ViUhard, Arnold Henry Schuyler . Brooklyn 

Walker, Lewis acnuyier Divpmoril 

Wall, Lemuel J Sangamon ^ S 

Ward, Brewer W Christian P^J 

Warner, Charles A Adams AshSS?^ 

Watkins, Wilbur Lee S'Vitt' We dSi 

Wejlmore, Tracy De W," . . . .•....;.;;;••;;;;;;;; • " j^ ksonviUe 

WeUs P^ul ^. ^If" v........... Willi*msficld 

Welsh, Michael C ^°^ Lexin ' 

Wheeler, Emmett ^.^V^^"" Savb'-< 

White, George McLean V.V.V.V/.V.V.'.V. :.■.'•' . B^ch« 

Wiechen, Harry wiu Redbud 

Wiegand, William G Monroe. Bunker mfi' 

Wiemers Julius Edward JJT.T'' NoiS3 

Wiggle, Gilbert E McLean iN^ormai 

Wilcox, Claude Vernon 2'''}?^:^ DupCi 

™^' S^ ^^;;--::::::::::::::::::::::l^tSs;^ :::::::::::::::::::::::::^''^r^ 

Madison ,9,':^,'?*^^ ^.«^ 

Sangamon Williamsville] 

Vermilion .••••• Cathn 

Sangamon WiUiamsviUe, 

McLean Normal 



Willey, Perry Homer 



Alvy Moulton 

Bernard E 

Donald H 

Fred A 

Lyndon Rutledge De'witt Clinton| 

Thomas Jefferson :::::;::::;st SlTr V.V.'.V.V.V.V............... Waterloo 



Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson 
Wilson 
Wilson 

Wirth, Edward H 

Witt, Robert Eugene ^/^^^^^;' Gi 

Wones, Edward Martin JJ^'S ::::::::::." Masc^ul 

Worms, Arthur Lawrence .V.V Parkersbr 

Wright, Owen B. Lawrence :...... Lawrencevi 

Wurtsburg, Leroy A wrnd?ord Roan" 

?ork' SSS"^ "^ ::::::::::::::::h^SM^::::::::::::::::'-^^^^ McLeanstK,, 

"^^^^m:^:::::::::: ^^i^n --—^ioo^ 

Young, Lawrence Henry McLean 

Younggreen, Joseph Larue Iroquois 



Illinois State Normal University 177 

STUDENTS ATTENDING THE MID-SPRING TERM 
May 1 — June 8, 1916 

COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

^^^ Peoria Elmwood 

Adams, Maude Douglas Newman 

lAlbin, Faye ChamDaigii" .' ! Sidney 

Aufdenkampe, Alma Pooe Golconda 

Austin, Hettie MrT ean Heyworth 

Bishop, Tressie Sland':::'.'. Olney 

Boley. Hattie Ami :::::::Ma?oupin Atwater 

Boston, Mary L. Morgan Waverly 

Branom, Eva Audrey Tasner West Liberty 

Bromm, Dollie M. MrTean Bloomington 

Brumfield, Gertrude Sland Olney 

Burgcner, Rose Lawrence Sumner 

Buzzard, Emma M rhlmDaien Penfield 

Cade, Ruth Peoria PrinceviUe 

Carroll, Mary LB.. ^^^^^ ••••• Quincy 

Chapman, Mrs. F. K Champaim Long View 

Chapman, Iva n^ Witt Clinton 

Chenoweth, Bemice TT^nrv Ophiem 

Chilberg, Irene "f";^ Mansfield 

Clark, Mary C Trnouois *.'.*.'. Watseka 

Clement, Irene MaSn Decatur 

Clendenen, Ruth SoSois Loda 

Clestcr, Blanche IroS Loda 

Clestcr, Oral rSmDlim . ^e^^^y 

Condit, Lois A MouTtne Lovington 

Condit, Lulu rVke Zion City 

Cordcr, Florence rhristian Edinburg 

Crowder, Feme Versev Grafton 

Crull, Mrs. Leah B rlri^tian Breckenridge 

Cummins, May Liv7neston ''*'.*.* .* Fairbury 

Darnall, Estelle Trr,?v ^°^ 

De Sherlia, Daisy J5"7 Pocahontas 

Doll, Marie A :::vermiiion"::::::::::::: panvine 

Downs, Erma niHctian Owaneco 

Drake, Julia Angeline rSn Equality 

Dunlap, Anna Barton Ford P»^o" 

Erickson, Anna Mason .*.'.*.*.'.*.* San Jose 

Fallkin, Bemice W MrT ran Colfax 

Fitzpatrick, Mabel vJnmmfs Ashkum 

Fruin, Nellie ?,Xmon' V....... Riverton 

Garrett, Lolah M fn^ft Lincoln 

Gerard, Jennie O rinnala, Newman 

Gilloghly, Sarah S Adams '.'.'. Q"»"<=y 

Godfrey, Grace AnnTlL Newman 

Green, Edith Myrtle Woodford El Paso 

Groth, Sylvia Sophia SI w ?t Farmer City 

Haggard, Ruth rLmnaim Mahomet 

Hannah, Goldie Sl.nn ^ Niantic 

Hawk, Thclma ?rnn?,nW .V Ashkum 

Hendron, Mabel rJ^ne? West Liberty 

Hendry, Grace E HendersoA .V Stronghurst 

Hicks, Mary E. ScLean * Towanda 

Hirst, Evan Lucille fl q,iia Streator 

Holliday, Anna ..,. rhamoaien *.'.*. ".'.'.".'. Mahomet 

Hood. Nellie Beatrice Mm,Tt?fe Lovington 

Hoover, Ruth Irene Slston '. Forrest 

Hueni, Marie i;r i"fn Jacksonville 

Hughes, Ella Pearl ??°nl .*.'.... Williamsfield 

Ireland, Leatha WnnHford '.'.'. Minonk 

Jones, Irma Lake Zion City 

Lawrence, Clara Luella :^aKc 2ion City 

Lawrence, Ethel Anita o ,,„h^/ Morris 

La Rette, Mae S ^nL; '. Olivet 

Livingston, Carrie Mae WnTdford :.■.':.*.*.*.'. El Paso 

Lyons, Margaret ?^°„ '^'^ Xenia 

McBratncy, Bertha ^ ay Xenia 

McBratney, Ruth h t -oA Normal 

McGrath, Mamie ??ur^!."i„U' Gifford 

McHcnry, Helen Lucile VrSoiT .V.'.'.V. ...... CheneyviUc 

Malone, Mary .^ y^iTll Hunt 

Martin, Elizabeth Gertrude Jasper 



178 Annual Catalog and Course of Study ^ 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Meara, Clara De Witt Farmer City 

Miller, Eva La Salle Streator i 

Miller, Jessie Champaign Rantoul > 

Montgomery, Faye M Logan Emden 

Musgrove, Ruth Richland Claremont 

Nellinger, Gertrude Woodford Minonk 

Oexner, Amanda Pauline Monroe Waterloo 

Ortman, Hartie Lorene Menard Atterberry H 

Ortman, Thelma Menard Atterberry 

Osborn, Edith E Sangamon Auburn 

Ott, Laura C St. Clair New Athens 

Owens, Julia Isabel Champaign Sidney 

Pacatte, Kathryn T Bond Pocahontas 

Pacatte, Marguerite Bond Pocahontas 

Papenhaus, Eva Tazewell Morgan 

Perkins, Iva Marie Jasper Advance 

Porch, Zexa Marshall Minonk 

Powell, Grace Marshall Speer 

Powell, Mary L Richland Claremont 

Prater, Birdie Christian Edinburg ■ 

Pregaldin, Judith Calhoun Hardin 

Quigg, Nellie M Cass Virginia 

Quigg, Rose Louise Cass Virginia 

Ramp, Jennie Gale Marshall Lacon 

Rice, Leonoir Vermilion Potomac 

Richards, Carrie E Macoupin Blinker Hill 

Richards, Cuba De Witt Farmer City 

Richmond, Julia Macon Latham 

Rogers, Helen C Morgan Waverly 

Royer, Vera Iroquois Loda 

Sampey, Marcella Livingston Fairbury 

Schilt, Magdalene Richland Olney 

Sears, Mamie E Vermilion Hoopeston 

Shutt, Edith Pearl Macoupin Girard 

Sims, Etta M Morgan Rohrer 

Slaten, Myrtle Jersey Grafton 

Smith, Clara Adams Mendon 

Snyder, Emma A Montgomery Coffeen 

Soliday, Mabel Madison Wood River 

Sorrill, Lois E Adams Adams 

Sprague, Helen Eliza Pike Hull 

Spurling, Mabel L Tazewell Minier 

Sturges, Effie Macon Decatur 

Slurges, Geneva Macon Decatur 

Sullivan, Maude Logan Beason 

Sutton, Bertha B Hancock Dallas City 

Taylor, Laura H Morgan Waverly 

Thompson, Grace Adams Paloma 

Thurman, Hazel Ford Paxton 

Tigar, Laura Mason Havana 

Titchenal, Cora Macoupin Brighton 

Titus, Mary Elizabeth Henry Genesee 

Turner, Feme Shirley Mason Havana 

Turner, Laurel Mason Havana 

Tumey, Nellie Greene Carrollton I 

Van Loon, Gertrude Mason Mason City \ 

Vaubel, Sadie Tazewell ; Washington 

Verkler, Lillian Iroquois Cissna Park 'I 

Walcher, Lottie N Christian Pana 

Weber, Lucynthia St. Clair New Athens 

Weisenbom, Birdella Adams Quincy 

Wiemers, Rose E Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Welch, Jeannie E Fayette Ramsey 

Yelch, Mabel Richland Olney 

Young, Anna De Witt Clinton 

Antle, Russell Jerome Sangamon Springfield 

Austin, Isaac White Carmi 

Aydt, Charles Edmund Hamilton Dahlgren 

Bayler, Clarence E Lake Zion City 

Boone, Edward Peoria Elmwood 

Chambers, Lyman Leroy Montgomery Raymond 

Foster, James D McLean Bloommgton 

Hempen, Fred J Clinton Carlyle 

Herrling, Charles St. Clair HH^^^^* 

Hildebrand, Har\'ey St. Clair Millstadt 

Hostettler, Tony C Lawrence LawrenceviUe 



Illinois State Normal University 179 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Uman, Robert B S^toJ''^^''^ :;;:;;:;::;:::::::: 'baSgin 

tughes, Cyrus Earl SwreiS ::::: Vincennes, Ind. 

ackson, Ervin Sw Calhoun 

ackson, Euris Peoria Mapleton 

lohnson, John Henry f?™ Mt. Zion 

kTm^'^'l^ics ::::::::::::Mon?gome-ry--v.v... ^Fiumore 

TlcCollum, Charles MpnarH Greenview 

TlcCue, Carl Thomas Saneamon Williamsville 

^cCue, Thomas E VerSfmon Fithian 

^lericle, Harold. S TlaTr Freeburg 

vlerkel, Benjamin MflHi<,on Worden 

vleyer, Alfred F MlciuSn CarlinviUe 

vieyer, William W wtbash .V.*: . •. .• Mt. Carmel 

Vliller, Clyde T oSn Atlanta 

VIontgomery, A. Ross Qt riair ^^^^ ^*- ^°^^* 

Muskopf, Richard r^nVtfn Omaha 

Price, John Knox Tawrence *.'.'.*. St. FrancisviUe 

Price, John O VohSson "i!:: . Grantsburg 

5helton, Ira CrSt^ Winchester 

Shibe, Ray C. MacouoVii '.V. Virden 

Shull, Jesse C. ^ TlS? • Freeburg 

Smith, C. Stanley iVv^ Hull 

Smith, Floyd Olin ct riaVr Freeburg 

Smith, Nolan MonteoOT ■■*.'.■*.*.'.'*■. Coffeen 

Snyder, Ross H AdTm? Adams 

SorriU, Albert TnwTenc; Sumner 

Staats, Riley... rhristi^n Mt. Auburn 

Truzell, Archie C. Akxander''*'*.".... Cairo 

Turner, James Festus MacoupS ScottsviUe 

Wheeler, Bruce E. ^ nSr Waterloo 

Wirth, Edward H St. Uair 



r 



180 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

PUPILS OF UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 
Graduates 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Andrews, Vivian Greene Fayette 

Banton, Oliver Macon Mt. Zion 

Barry, Lucille McLean Bloomington 

Bracken, Dwight McLean Bloomington 

Browning, Roy Pope Golconda 

Clampett, Donald McLean Bloomington 

Coolidge, Hesketh McLean Bloomington 

Courtright, Dudley McLean Normal 

Crouch, Zuma McLean Normal 

Dillon, Elmo McLean Bloomington 

Eaton, Alice McLean Normal 

Funk, Gladys McLean Shirley 

Garlough, Melvin McLean Normal 

Gipson, Lela McLean Bloomington 

Griser, Norman McLean Normal 

Grote, Louise McLean Normal 

Harrison, Hugh De Witt Clinton 

Harrison, Ruth De Witt Clinton 

Hinthome, Blanche McLean Normal 

Holmes, Luster Saline Harrisburg 

Hopwood, Ward Menard CantraU 

Humphries, Paul McLean Hudson 

Irwin, Marjorie McLean Normal 

Irwin, Phillips McLean Normal 

Kincaid, Lawrence Menard AthenB 

Liggitt, Chester McLean Normal 

Little, Marjorie McLean Normal 

Manchester, Margaret McLean Normal 

Martins, Pearl McLean Normal 

Moon, Hazel McLean Towanda 

Morse, Harriet McLean Normal 

Peeke, Stella McLean Bloomington 

Philipp, Esther McLean Normal 

Pilch, Maud Brown Versailles 

Pringle, Helen McLean Normal 

Quaid, Lloyd McLean Downs 

Randolph, Florence Pope Golconda 

Ridgley, Winifred McLean Normal 

Rust, Lawrence McLean Bloomington 

Rust, Louis Ford Sibley 

Stewart, Bradford McLean Normal 

Stewart, Ruth McLean Bloomington 

Ward, Raymond McLean Normal 

Whitcomb, Donald McLean Bloomington 

Whitmore, Le Roy Grundy Gardner 



Juniors 



Aldrich, Dorothy .. 
Ambrose, Bernard 
Armstrong, Russell 
Beckman, Mame . . 

Blair, Julius 

Bohrer, Joe 

Bondurant, Medora 

Boyer, Zela 

Buck, Arthur , 

Calhoun, Mildred . 

Cavins, Joe 

Clayton, Vera 

Coen, Donald 

Coolidge, Beatrice , 
Courtright, Lyle . . . 
Crose, Richard .... 

Curry, Hal 

Custer, Frank , 

Dobson, James .... 
Dodge, Monroe .... 
Downen, Hilas .... 
Dunn, Frances .... 
Elliott, Winefred .. 
Evans, Harwood .. 



.McLean Bloomington/] 

.McLean Hudson 

, McLean Normal 

.McLean Bloomington, 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Bloomington 

.(Missouri) Sumner 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Normal 

. Peoria Monica 

.McLean Normal 

.Ford Kempton 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Bloomington 

.McLean Normal 

.McLean Bloomington 

.McLean Normal 

• McLean Normal 

.Shelby Moweaqua 

.McLean Bloomington 

.Gallatin Ridgway 

.Christian Mt. Auburn 

.McLean Bloomington 

.McLean Bloomington 



Illinois State Normal University 181 



NAME 



COUNTY 



Jregg, Robert Ga^Uatm •;•;;;—;- Normal 

liT'Z^ ?'}^ :::::::::::::McLeaS ::::::.: Normal 



Sregory, Ruth ITrvTngston Flanagan 

iarms, Robert iSST".::::::::::::::::::::::* BioSS 



roskreutz, Henry 



hoover, Willard McLean Danvers 

Sw«e<,--;::::::::::;:::::::::::::::::~^^ 
S:;r-?^'=^:::::::;::::::::::::;::::::::::|j:---^ 

Koos, Lawrence McLean Normal 

Kraft, Lorraine McLeaS Hudson 

Lawrence McLeaS Hudson 

La^Yrence, Sydney ScLeaS Bloomington 

Livngston, Herbert McLean ' Bloomington 

Livmgston, Morton McLean Hudson 

McKinney Inez McLean .V;.:.; .V Normal 

Macy Roland McLean Normal 

Marye, Marie McLean Normal 

Millikm Vaughn McLeaS ' Normal 

Mohr, Lyle McLean ;;;- ^ Bloomington 

Montgomery, Lynn . McLeaS Bloomington 

Montgomery, Mildred McLeaS ::'.:.'.'..............•••. Bloominiton 

! !*,!!*. '.!*.!*.'.!". Champaign ■S^^^^'l 

McLean •• Normal 



Moore, Joe rhTmDai<^ Gifford 

Morse, Finley MrlSfn Normal 

^''}'^' ^#^-?i^ McLeaS "V.'.*.'.:.'.'.'.'. ... ... Lexington 

Ogden, Edith MrTeaS Normal 

gS„|^\ie„--:::::::::::::::::::::;:::::;;|^^^^^ 
S4°|.i-:.:::::;::;:::::::::::::::::::::|g :::::::::::::;::::::::::;;:: S^^^^ 

??S."w^tr •;::::•.:::::::: McLean Boo,n,ng^on 

SrFo^".Sr;::::;:::::::::::::::::::;:;::McLS^.::::::::::::::: Nom., 

S;SS^-::::::;:::::;::::::::::::::::|E;;;;;=^^^^^^ 

Sanford, Robert « , t i.U"^ Port Bvron 

Schafer, Ralph Rock Island San Jose 

Spinker, Oscar McLe'In .■.*.■*.*.'*'.'*.■.'*.'.■ ' Bloomington 

Stevenson, Adlai McLean Bloomington 

sSng'teif '"' ••••:::::::::::::::::::::MctSn :::::::::.:: Bloomington 

TrrSr Irene McLean Bloomington 

Turner, Irene .Iroquois Crescent City 



Sweeting, Lela ;;;;;;'.'.!'.".!'.!!'.McLean ^Bloomington 

wesseis, Walter •::::::::::::::::: ;^^^d";;;;;::::... --••.secor 



wS,'S^erick-:::::::::::::::::::::::::::McL;a^ Bioommgton 

Sophomores 

Bachenheimer, Hazel McLean ^--cTdo 

^SS'Z.:-:::::-—::--^^^^ -.^-^Zy 

Barnes. Genevieve ^Tefn •.•.•.•.•.•.:.:.'.•.'.".■ Bloor^Jng^on 

[V/.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.Mchtan Bloomington 



Beckman, Arnold iMcLean •;•;;;;;;;;;;;:::;:::::: iSngSn 

Wilber. Gertrude McLean •^; V ^°™*i 



Beckman, Harold 



Boyer, Wakefield iMcLean ;•;;;;;;::;;:::; ilSroS 

i=; i^^ci-::::::::::::::::::::::::::::McS ::::::::::.: Bioominjon 

Bryant', Joe"^ Gallatin Omaha 

Buck, Howard McLean HudTon 

Burtis, Parker McLean, Hudson 

Cade, Helen S?el"aT^ /.V.V.V.V.V.V ' BloomiSStoS 

Capen, Henry McLean Oakfield 

Coffey., George Douiias ;;;;;;;;;;;;; 'baiSfcuy 

Cummings. Charles ?/V*^°*^ Normal 

Custer. Bcmadine McLean JNormai 



182 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Darrah, Dorothy McLean Bloomington 

Davis, George McLean Bloomington 

Eddy, Emma McLean Bloomington 

Emmert, Ralph McLean Bloomington 

Fagerburg, Myrtle McLean Bloomington 

Fanslow, Louie Kankakee Herscher 

Funk, Elizabeth McLean Shirley 

Funk, Eugene McLean Shirley 

Funk, Mary McLean Bloomington 

Gray, Percy McLean Normal 

Haley, Elizabeth McLean Bloomington 

Harpster, Earl Richland Olney 

Henry, Bertha McLean Bloomington 

Hill, Mary Menard Fancy Prairie 

Hoffman, Alvin Randolph Red Bud 

Hollis, Myra McLean Randolph 

Husted, Stanley McLean Bloomington 

Johnston, Floy McLean Bloomington 

Lawrence, Wilber McLean Hudson 

Lees, Harry Shelby Oconee 

Livingston, Sam McLean Bloomington 

Luther, Normal McLean Normal 

McCormick, Robert McLean Normal 

McQuilkin, Myrtle Marshall Speer 

Merwin, Rachel McLean Bloomington 

Miller, Caroline McLean Bloomington 

Milliken, Trent McLean Normal 

Mohr, Earl McLean Normal 

Neeld, Phyllis McLean Normal 

O'Neill, William McLean Bloomington 

Orendorff, Maurine McLean Bloomington 

Orendorff, Zena McLean Randolph 

Palmer, Pauline McLean Normal 

Peirce, Bane McLean Bloomington 

Pickering, Miriam McLean Normal 

Pierson, Ralph McLean Bloomington 

Porteriield, Alice McLean Bloomington 

Quinn, Irene McLean Normal 

Ramseyer, Lloyd McLean Hudson 

Rapp, Ruby Marshall Speer 

Rhinehart, Victor McLean Kerrick 



Robinson, Ruth McLean 

Ryburn, Florence McLean 

Sager, Lyle McLean 

Sanders, Josephine McLean 

Schlosser, Verlin McLean 

Stein, Edward Ford 

Steinhilber, John 

Sutherland, Mildred 



Normal 

Bloomington 

Hudson 

Bloomington 

Hudson 

Sibley 

Iroquois Crescent City 

McLean Bloomington 



Thomas, Lewis McLean Bloomington 

Victor, Sturgis McLean Normal 

Westhoff, Clarence McLean Normal 

Wiedman, Naomi McLean Normal 

Wilber, Gertrude McLean Normal 

Winans, Mildred Peoria Chillicothc 

Ziebold, Eugene McLean Bloomington 



Freshmen 



Allan, Clyde ... 
Arbuckle, Daisy 
Bauman, Harold 
Boon, Josephine 
Bryant, Mignon 
Busic, Esther ... 



McLean Normal 

McLean Heyworth 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

Burr, Margaret McLean Bloomington 

Carr, Richard McLean Bloomington 

Carter, Marion McLean Bloomington 

Champion, Sarah McLean Normal 

Coppenbarger, Lester McLean Bloomington 

Dudley, Richard McLean Bloomington 

Evans, John McLean Bloomington 

Evans, Miriam McLean Normal 

Foster, Judson McLean Normal 

Funk, Ben McLean Bloomington 

Garvey, Helen McLean Normal 

Oarvey, Richard McLean Normad 



I 



Illinois State Normal Universtty 183 

rnTI-NTTY POSTOFFIS 

NAME COUNTY _ 

r ., „ ,, McLean Bloomington 

^ST'^^* ::::::::::::Mci:ean ;:; Normal 

Hill, Cecil A/TrT pan Normal 

Hinton, Louise MrTean '. Normal 

Holley, Lloyd McLean V.............. Hudson 

Humphries, Fred Shv Findlay 

Jackson, Elgin McLeIn *.'.".'.' Hudson 

King, Leonard P^rfa Laura 

Kneer, Greta Livineston " V.V.V.V.V. Chatsworth 

Koerner, Charles MrS Normal 

Liggitt, Pau iivinSon *■*:::: Dwight 

Ludwick, Wilson McLeIn . Normal 

Macy, William MrTean Bloomington 

Marr, Elisha McLean ""'.'.'.'. Bloomington 

Miller, Franklin MrLeaS Bloomington 

Montgomery, Marjone McLean Bloomington 

Noggle, Carroll MrTe^n Bloomington 

Oberkoetter Francis McLean Bloomington 

Peirce, Earl McLeaS Randolph 

Powell, Pauline MrT^an Normal 

Reynold, Edna McLean ;;:::::: Shirley 

Rinehart, Donald MrT^n Bloomington 

Riseling, Cecil McLean '.'.'.'. Bloomington 

Ryburn, Madeline McLean Normal 

Schroeder, Fred McLean Normal 

Schroeder, Irma MacouSin *'■**.".*.'. ". Nilwood 

Smith, Louis ^ McLeaS Bloomington 

Spafford, Louise m5lSS Normal 

Stout, Langdon ^. win Clinton 

Tuggle, Gladys MpTMn *.'.*.'. Bloomington 

Utesch, Bemice MrLeaS Normal 

Watson, Arthur S Loda 

Weaver, Ruby MrT ean V.V.V.V.V.'. V. .... Bloomington 

Welch, Dorothy McLean Bloomington 

Whitcomb, Gleen MrT^n Bloomington 

Winkle, Leta McLean 









i 



I 



18^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



IS 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT AND TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Attendance by Counties, June 14, 1915— June 8, 1916 

Adams 31 Johnson 4 Scott „ 

Alexander 1 Kane 4 Shelby .'..*!ll3 

Bond 7 Kankakee 42 Stark ......6 

B^own 13 Knox 10 St. Clair .*...'...*.. jg 

Bureau 52 Lake 18 Stephenson 5 

Calhoun 14 La Salle 48 Tazewell 95 

C^"°" 3 Lawrence 28 Vermilion ^47 

Cass 20 Livingston 98 Wabash 6 

Champaign 60 Logan 74 Warren .,.. ^ 

Christian 60 Macon 80 Wayne ''..'.'..... S 

Clark 5 Macoupin 82 White 3 

Clay 9 Madison 63 Whiteside \ 7 

Clinton 9 Marion 18 Will 42 

Cook 18 Marshall 53 Williamson* .'.'.**.*...*.*.'.'*.'.' i 

Crawford 6 Mason 39 Woodford 81 

Cumberland 4 McDonough 2 Arkansas . 3 

"c Witt 56 McHenry 1 California '..'.'. 1 

Douglas 28 McLean 542 Colorado 1 

^*^8" 10 Menard 29 Connecticut 1 

Edwards 2 Mercer 4 Florida 2 

Effingham 2 Monroe 5 Georgia \ 

E*y«"<^ 13 Montgomery 44 Indiana 3 

Ford 76 Morgan 46 Iowa .'.'.*.*" 3 

Franklin 5 Moultrie 19 Kansas ... . 1 

F^^ton 24 Ogle 1 Minnesota !.*.*.'.!! 2 

Callatm 8 Peoria 69 Missouri 7 

C^«^"« 31 Perry 3 Nebraska 3 

^^'■""dy 18 Piatt 62 North Dakota 1 

Hamilton 13 Pike 33 Ohio 2 

H^"^°<^ 9 Pope 10 Oklahoma 1 

Henderson 8 Pulaski 3 South Dakota 1 

H^'^ 26 Putnam 20 Tennessee 1 

Iroquois 62 Randolph 10 Vermont 2 

J^^k^on 2 Richland 17 West Virginia 3 

J^^P^'" 6 Rock Island 12 Wisconsin 3 

Jefferson 4 Saline 3 England 1 

Jersey 12 Sangamon 85 

JoDaviess 3 Schuyler 7 Total 2 874 



Illinois State Normal University 185 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

TwELv Months Ending June 8, 1916 

Senior College Graduates 18 

Junior College Graduates 45 



Teachers College Undergraduates (Section K) 

Normal School Graduates • 102 

Undergraduates 

Section A 50 

B 50 

C , 34 

D 13 

E 42 

F 7 

G 23 

H 27 

I 21 

J 18 

L 81 

M 51 

N 66 

O ^ 

p 65 



63 
147 
— 210 



552 
654 



Mid-Spring Term, 1916 1^8 

Summer School 1915, First Term 1834 

Summer School 1915, Second Term 467 

2301 

Different Summer Students 2077 

Total attending only in summer 1845 

Total different students in Normal School and Teachers College 2837 

High-school students, Graduates 45 

Third year 80 

Second year " 

First year 53 

251 

Elementary School pupils (12 months) 472 

Kindergarten pupils ^3 

Total of resident students and pupils 3703 

Non-resident students in Extension Courses 513 

Grand total, resident and non-resident 4216 



INDEX 



PAGE 

ccredited High Schools 17 

ccounting 126 

dmissions, Conditions of la 

dvanst Standing 18 

dvertizing •,","•* Jon 

griculture 33, 120 

griculture, Courses in S3, 48, 120 

gronomy 122 

id to Students 18 

Igebra, Courses in 62 

lumni Quarterly 14 

jialytical Geometry 65 

.nimal Husbandry 120 

nimal Evolution 75 

.pparatus, Construction of 68 

appointment to Scholarships 15 

Tchitectural Drawing 114 

argumentation 99 

Lfithmetic, Courses in 60, 61 

arithmetic in the Grades 137 

Lrt, Courses in 28, 106 

64 



iStronomy 

kthletic Association 13 

athletics 131 

ittendance, 1915-16 191 

Jacteriology 77 

Jand 14, 105 

lench Work 112 

Uological Science 71 

Uology Method 74 

Jird Study 74 

Joard and Rooms 18 

Joard of Education 3 

Jookbinding 110 

Bookkeeping 61, 126 

iotany, Courses in 72, 76, 77 

Browning, Course in 93 

Jildings 11 

Business Arithmetic 128 

Daesar, Courses in 101 

Calendar 4 

Campus 13 

Cement Construction 122 

Certificates, Teachers' 22 

Chemistry, Courses in 69 

Christian Associations 13 

Choice of Studies 43 

Choral Club 14, 105 

Cicero, Courses in 101, 102 

Civil Government 86 

Classifications of Students 20 

Clay Modeling 107 

Climatology 82 

College Algebra 65 

Color, Course in 108 

Commercial Arithmetic 128 

Commmercial Geografy 80 

Commercial Program 34 

Composition 94 

Conditions of Admission 15 

Conduct of Students 43 

Conservation 82 

Construction Work 109 

Cooking Courses 117 

Costume Design HI 

Counties Represented 192 

Country Life Club 14 

Country Schools 39, 124 



PAGE 



Courses of Study 23, 42 

Course of Study, Training School 137 

Credits at State University 19 

Credits for work elsewhere 16 

Credits required for graduation 19 

Critiques 136 

Cryptogamic Botany 72 

Curriculums 23, 42 

Daily Programs 49-53 

Dairy Husbandry 123 

Debating 99 

Degrees 35 

Delinquents 44 

Design 28-109 

Dietetics 119 

Domestic Art 30, 115 

Domestic Science 31, 117 

Drama, Courses in 92-99 

Dramatic Club 14 

Drawing, Courses in 106 

Dressmaking 115 

Ecology 76 

Economics 88 

Education, Ancient and Medieval 57 

Education, History of 55-56 

Education in the United States 57 

Education, Modern European 57 

Education, Principles of 55 

Educational Psychology 57, 58 

Electiv Courses 43 

Employment of Teachers 19 

English History 84-85 

Enrolment 16 

Entomology 75 

Equipment 12 

Ethics 58 

Etymology, Latin-English 101 

Evolution, Organic 75 

Examinations 16, 18 

Expenses 18 

Extemporaneous Speaking 98 

Extension Courses 59 

Faculty 5-8 

Faculty Committees 9 

Fall Term Program 51 

Farm Management 123 

Farm Crops 122 

Farm Machinery 122 

Furniture Making 113 

Gardening 123 

Garment Making 116 

General Exercizes 43 

General Method 55 

Geografy, Courses in 79 

Geology 82 

Geometry 63 

German, Courses in 102, 103 

Glee Clubs 14, 105 

Graduating Class 138, 139 

Graduation 19 

Grammar Courses 94 

Gymnasium H 

Gymnastics 129 

Handwork 109 

Harmony 105 

High-School Department 45 

High-School Graduates 17 

High-School Music 105 



188 



Index 

PAGE 



Historical Sketch of School 10 

History, Courses in 83 

History of Commerce 128 

Home Decoration Ill 

Home Economics 32, 47, 116 

Horace, Courses in 101 

Household Art 29, 115 

Household Science 31, 117 

Index, The 14 

Inductiv Geometry 60 

Industrial Chemistry 69 

Industrial History 89 

Kindergarten 25, 134 

Kindergarten Primary 25 

Laboratories 12 

Laboratory Assistants 57 

Latin, Courses in 43, 100 

Lecture Association 14 

Library 12, 133 

Library Management 133 

Literary Exercizes required 13 

Literary Societies 13 

Literature, Courses in 90 

Literature, History of 91 

Livy 101 

Loans to Students 18 

Location 11 

Machine Drawing 114 

Manual Training 27, 111 

Mechanical Drawing 114 

Metal Working 110 

Mensuration 60 

Mihnery 116 

Milton, Courses in 90 

Modern European History 84 

Municipal Government 87 

Museum 12 

Music, Courses in 26, 104 

Musical Organizations 14 

Nature Study 71, 73, 77 

Nature Study Club 14 

Normal, Town of 11 

Oratorical Association 13 

Orchestra 14, 105 

Organic Evolution 75 

Organization of the School 15 

Orthografy 96 

Ovid 101 

Painting 108 

Pattern Making 112 

Pedagogy 54 

Physical Training 129 

Penmanship, Course in 96 

Percentage 61 

Philology 101 

Phonics 98 

Physics, Courses in 65-68 

Physiografy 79-81 

Physiology 73 

Plant Ecology 76 

Plant Morfology 76 

Plant Physiology 76 

Platform Speaking 98 

Pledge to Teach 16 

Poetry, Study of 91, 92, 93, 98 

Political Science 86 

Positions for Teachers 19 

Pottery 110 

Practis Teaching 135 



PAGE 



Preparatory Program 41, 42 

Primary Reading '. ,95 

Principles of Education \\\%t 

Programs, Daily 4; 

Psychology 54 

Public Speaking 9l\'% 

Railroads \\ 

Relation to State University '.\\t, 

Rhetoric 94 

Rhetoricals ]4j| 

Rules Governing Studies \\il^ 

Rural Schools iS 

Rural Education m 

Salesmanship 'm 

Sanitary Chemistry ^fl 

Sanitation and Hygiene % 

Scholarships ^ 

School Law jg 

School Administration J| 

School Gardens , 

School Management , 

Science Club , 

Science of Discourse , 

Sewing, Course in , 

Shakspere 90, 

Shorthand l; 

Social Ethics 

Sociology 

Singing 

Soil Physics 

Special Students 

Special English 

Spelling 

Spring Term Program 

Storj'-Telling, Art of 

Students' Loan Fund 

Student Organizations 

Student Publications 

Students Enrold 

Substitutions of Electivs 43 

Summary of Attendance 19^ 

Summer School 8, W 

Summer Term Programs 49, 50 

Tacitus m 

Taxonomic Biology 73 

Teachers 5 

Teachers' Certificates 22 

Teachers College 3S47 

Teaching Process, The 54' 

Text Books Ift 

Textils, Courses in 116 

Three- jear Curriculum 481 

Township Scholarships IS, 

Training Department VSf 

Trigonometry 64' 

Two-year Curriculums 23-3^ 

Tuition Fees 18, 4*' 

Typewriting 127^ 

University High School 45 

University of Illinois W 

Vidette 14 

Vergil la 

Vocal Music IW 

Winter Term Program S 

Woodwork 112 

Word Analysis 96 

Wordsworth 90 

Writing 96 

Zoology, Courses in 71-75 



t 



] 



INOIS STATE NORMAL 
RSITY ^ NORMAL, ILL. 



The 
RMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERIES 15 NUMBER 63 

APRIL, 1917 



C .VIM- 
CONTAINING THE 

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 191718 



PUBLISHT IN JULY, OCTOBER, 
JANUARYS APRIL, EACH YEAR 



.pn, ' ' 1918 



* ^ ^ %^w. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL 
[^ERSITY * NORMAL, ILL. 



The 
(RMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERIES 15 NUMBER 63 

APRIL, 1917 



CONTAINING THE 

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 1917-18 



PUBLISHT IN JULY, OCTOBER, 
JANUARY & APRIL, EACH YEAR 



Whenever two spellings of a 
word are authorized by the New 
International or the New Stand- 
ard Dictionary, it is the practis 
of the State Normal University 
to use in its publications the 
shorter form. 



*i 



w\ 



BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 



CHARLES L. GAPEN, Bloomington, President 
FRANCIS G. BLAIR, Springfield, 
Ex-Officio Member and Secretary 



E. R. E. KIMBROUGH, Danville 

J. STANLEY BROWN, Joliet 

FRANK B. STITT, El Paso 

WILLIAM P. WALL, Staunton 

JOHN J. AMSLER, East Peoria 

ADRIAN M. DOOLIN, Chicago 

SILAS ECHOLS, Mt. Vernon 

A. R. SMITH, Quincy 

GUSTAVE BALTZ, Millstadt 

HENRY HOFF, Germantown 

JOHN L. BRUMMERSTEDT, Altamont 

GEORGE W. HUGHES, Hume 

HENRY OAKES, Bluffs 



F. D. MARQUIS, Bloomington, 
Tresurer 



After June 30, 1917, the State Normal University wil be under the ad- 
ministration, direction, and control of the Normal School Board provided 
in the Civil Administrative Code of the State of Illinois. 



CALENDAR FOR 1917—18 



The school year of forty-eight weeks is divided into t! 
terms of twelv weeks each, and two summer terms of six w^ 
each. A mid-spring term of six weeks runs parallel to the h 
half of the spring term. 

Summer Session, 1917 

Monday, June 11 — First Term begins. 
Monday, July 23 — Second Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 29 — Second Term ends. 



®^ni 



Fall Term, 1917 

Monday, September 3 — Opening of Training School. 
Monday, September 10 — Fall Term begins, Normal and 

School Departments. 
Friday, November 30 — Fall Term ends. 

Winter Term, 1917—18 

Monday, December 3 — Winter Term begins. 

Friday, December 21 — Annual Contest of the Literary 

cieties. 
Saturday, December 22 — Recess of two weeks. 
Monday, January 3, 1918 — Winter Term resumes. 
Saturday, February 16 — Founders' Day Celebration. 
Saturday, February 23 — Annual Contest in Oratory. 
Friday, March 8 — End of Winter Term. ,■ 

Vacation of nine days. | 

Spring Term, 1918 f 

Monday, March 18 — Spring Term begins. 

Friday, April 26 — Oshkosh-Normal Debate. 1 

Monday, April 29 — Mid- Spring Term begins. '••■ 

Friday, May 24 — Junior Class Play. 

Thursday, June 6 — Annual Commencement Exercises. 

Sumtmer Session, 1918 

Monday, June 10 — First Summer Term begins. 
Monday, July 22 — Second Summer Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 28 — Second Summer Term ends. 
Monday, September 9 — Beginning of Fall Term of year 1918-1 



FACULTY 



r VID FELMLEY, A. B., University of Michigan; LL.D., University 
of Illinois; L. H. D., Blackburn University 

PRESIDENT. 

HENRY McGORMIGK, Ph. D., LL.D., Illinois Wesleyan 

Vice-President. 

(iSON LEROY MANCHESTER, A. M., Dartmouth College; LL.D., 
Illinois Wesleyan 

Professor of Languages and Economics. 

J. ROSE COLBY, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., University of Michigan 

Professor of Literature. 

MANFRED JAMES HOLMES, B. L., Cornell University 

Professor of Pedagogy and History of Education. 

FREDERICK DELOS BARBER, A. M., Swarthmore College 

Professor of Physics. 

GEORGE HENRY HOWE, Ph. D., Illinois Wesleyan 

Professor of Mathematics. 

FRANK WILLIAM WESTHOFF, 

Professor of Music. 

DOUGLAS CLAY RIDGLEY, A. B., Indiana University 

Professor of Geografy. 

EDWIN ARTHUR TURNER, A. B., Indiana University; A. M., 
Columbia University 

Director of the Training School. 

JOHN LOSSEN PRICER, A. M., University of Illinois 

Professor of Biological Science. 

ADNAH CLIFTON NEWELL, B. S., University of Michigan 

Director of Manual Training. 

WILLIAM ANDREW LAWRENCE BEYER, A. M., Ohio State 
University 

Professor of Political Science. 

HARVEY ANDREW PETERSON, Ph. D., University of Chicago 

Professor of Psychology. 

HOWARD WILLIAM ADAMS, B. S., Iowa State College 

Professor of Chemistry. 

HARRY ALBERT McGILL, A. B., University of Chicago 

Professor of History. 

IRWIN ARTHUR MADDEN, B. S., University of Illinois 

Professor of Agriculture. 

HERMANN HENRY SCHROEDER, Ph. B., Cornell College 

Professor of Education. 

CHESTER MILTON SANFORD, A. B., Cornell University 

Professor of Public Speaking. 



CLARISSA ELIZABETH ELA, 

Teacher of Art. 

ELMER WARREN GAVINS, 

Teacher of Penmanship and Orthografy. 

ALICE JEAN PATTERSON, S. B., University of Chicago 

Teacher of Nature Study. 

OLIVE LILLIAN BARTON, A. B., University of Illinois 

Assistant in Mathematics and Dean of Women. 

GRACE ARLINGTON OWEN, A. M., Columbia University 

Teacher of Reading. 

KITURAH PARSONS, 

Teacher of Household Science. 

EDITH IRENE ATKIN, A. B., University of Michigan 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

HENRY HARRISON RUSSELL, 

Director of Physical Education for Men. 

GRACE THOMASMA, A. B., University of Michigan 

Teacher of Rhetoric. 

CLARA MAUD PENSTONE, Ph. B., University of Chicago 

Teacher of Grammar. 

ANNETTA BELLE COOPER, B. Ed., Illinois State Normal 
University 

Assistant in Household Art. 

JESSIE ISA LUMMIS, A. B., University of Illinois 

Teacher of Latin. 

HERMAN G. MILBRADT, B. L., University of Wisconsin i 

Teacher of German. 

VERNE McDOUGLE, A. M., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant in Manual Training. 

ANNA ELIZABETH SWAINSON, A. B., University of Missout 
A. M., Columbia University 
MARJORIE NIND, A. B., University of Wisconsin 

Teachers of Design. ' 

CORA IRENE DAVIS, Ph. B., University of Chicago 

Director of Household Art. 

MABEL CLAIRE STARK, S. B., University of Chicago 
EUNICE BLACKBURN, B. Ed., Illinois State Normal Universit 

Assistants in Geografy. 

EDGAR PACKARD 

Director of Countrj' School Department. 

HAROLD FRANCIS JAMES, 

Director of Art. 

ARTHUR ROWLAND WILLIAMS, A. B., Kenyon College 

Director of Commercial Department. 

AUSTIN ELGIN WILBER, A. B., University of Michigan 

Director of Extension Department. 



EDNA FLORENCE GOITH, B. S., Kansas State Agricultural 

College 

Assistant in Household Science. 

LILLIAN DORA DOLE, A. B., A. M., University of Illinois 

Teacher of Zoology. 

iTINFIELD SCOTT, B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University; 
B. S., University of Illinois 

Teacher of Agriculture. 

MARION WRIGHT, 

Assistant in Music. 

LYDIA CLARK, 

Director of Gymnastics for Women. 

ANNA BLAKE, B. S., University of Chicago 

Teacher of Physiology. 

GERTRUDE BAKER, 

Assistant in Physical Education. 

VERLE SELLS, B. L., Milwaukee-Downer College 

Teacher of Shorthand and Typewriting. 

ETHEL OLDAKER 

Teacher of Penmanship. 

RALPH W. PRINGLE, A. M., Harvard University 

Principal of the High School 

ALMA MARY HAMILTON, A. B., Illinois Wesleyan; A. M., 

Columbia University 

FRANCES MILTON MOREHOUSE, A. M., University of Illinois 

OLIVE NEVILLE BARTON, A. B., University of Chicago 

THOMAS MORSE BARGER, B. S., University of Illinois 

MAE KNIGHT STEELE, A. B., University of Illinois 

Teachers in the High School. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON WILSON, B. Ed, Illinois State Normal 

University 

Principal of the Training School. 

AGNES GROVES STORIE, B. S., University of Chicago 

Training Teacher, Seventh Grade. 

LORA MARY DEXHEIMER, 

Training Teacher, Sixth Grade. 

MARY EVANGELINE ROBB, 

Training Teacher, Fifth Grade. 

JESSIE MAY DILLON, 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. 

IDELLA RETTINA BERRY, B. S., University of Chicago 

Training Teacher, Third Grade. 

LURA MARY EYESTONE, B. S., Columbia University 

Training Teacher, Second Grade. 

NELLIE CATHERINE THOMPSON, 

Training Teacher, First Grade. 



MARGARET E. LEE, 
BLANCHE LOVETT, 

Directors of the Kindergarten. 

CONSTANCE SMITH, 

Assistant in the Kindergarten. 

HARVEY TRIMBLE WHITE, 

/ Principal of the School at the Soldiers Orphais Home 

JANE ANN BLACKBURN, B. Ed., Illvaois State Normal TJniven 

Primary Training Teacher Soldiers Orphans Home. 

THOMAS BILLINGS, 

Gardener. 

ANGELINE VERNON MILNER, 

Librarian. 

LILLIAN HAVENHILL, A. B., Illmois College 

BERTRAM FRENCH, 

KATHERINE STITES, 

EDNA KELLEY, 

Assistant Librarians. 

FLORA PENNELL DODGE, 
LOTTIE LAVONNE HAYES, 

Stenografers. 

KATHERINE CARSTAIRS, 

Registration Clerk. 

JENNIE TURNER 

Financial Clerk. 



EXTRA TEACHERS EMPLOYD FOR SUMMER SESSION. 

-1917- 

HARRY AMBROSE PERRIN, Ph. B., University of Chicago 
FREDERICK WILLLVM WECK, Ph. D., University of Michigan 

Education. 

ALMA JESSIE NEILL, A. M., University of Illinois 

CYRUS WILLIAM LANTZ, A. M., University of Illinois 

HARRY DWIGHT WAGGONER, Ph. D., University of Illinois 

RALPH HARLAN LINKINS, Ph. D., University of Illinois 

Biology. 

WILLIAM LUTHER GOBLE, B. S., University of Illinois 
GARFIELD ARTHUR BOWDEN, B. S., University of Chicago 

Physical Science. 



HENRY HUGH EDMUNDS, 

WILLIAM WRIGHT McCULLOGH, 

([N ARTHUR STRONG, B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University 

WILLIAM HAWKES, A. B., University of Illinois 

MARTHA HUNT 

ISAAC NEWTON WARNER, B. S., University of Chicago 

ELSIE WETZEL, 

Mathematics. 

A. FRANCIS TRAMS, A. B., University of Illinois 

JOHN ALEXANDER GEHLMAN, B. S., Knox College 

MRS. ELIZABETH M. CUNNINGHAM, 

ROBERTA LEE DAVIS, 

FRANCES FOOTE, 

English Grammar and Composition. 

GORDON WATKINS, A. M., University of Pennsylvania 

Economics and Sociology. 

IVERETT LEROY WALTERS, A. B., University of Wisconsin 
CHARLES HENRY DORRIS, A. M., University of Illinois 

History and Civics. 

EVA MITCHELL, A. B., University of Illinois 

ESSIE CHAMBERLAIN, Ph. B., University of Chicago 

LUCINDA ELIZA GILPIN, A. M., University of Michigan 

Literature. 

BRISTOL EMERSON WING, 

Manual Training. 

DWIGHT EVERETT WATKINS, A. M., Knox College 
NAANA LYNN FORBES, 

Reading. 

MARTIN FRANCIS GLEASON, 

JULIA VERNON CRISWELL, 

LAURA VAN PAPPELENDAM, 

BLANCHE WILKERSON FULKERSON, 

Art Instruction. 

RUTH VIRGINIA SIMPSON, 

BESSIE DAVID, 
LILAH GEUSSENHAINER, 

I Household Science. 

ANNA GRACE HOPKINS, 

Music. 

GERTRUDE BENDER SCHILL, 
DOROTHY M. BUELL, 

Physical Training. 

MARY EMILY SMITH, 
ETHEL M. GREEN, 

The Training Schooji. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Alumni— Mr. Pricer, Miss Penstone, Miss Cooper, Miss Steele, 
Athletics — Mr. Russell, Mr. Holmes, Mr. McDougle. 
Auditing — Mr. Adams, Miss Atkin, Mr. Gavins. 
Bildings — Mr. Newell, Mr. James, Miss Ela, Mr. Wilson. 
Bulletins and Printing— Mr. Holmes, Mr. Williams, Miss ThomasJ 
Campus— Mr. Pricer, Miss Patterson, Mr. Wilson. 
Christian Work— Miss Atkin, Mr. Adams, Miss Barton, Miss Dill 
Course of Study— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Howe, Miss Colby. 
Disciplin— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Russell, Miss Barton, Miss Col] 

Mr. Howe. 
Entertainments— Mr. Ridgley, Miss Atkin, Miss Stark. 
Faculty Club Programs — Mr. Peterson. 
Faculty Receptions— Miss Thompson, Miss Parsons, Miss Bak 

Mr. McDougle. 
General Exercises— Mr. Sanford, Miss Wright, Miss Berry, M 

Owen. 
Graduating Exercises— Miss Ela, Mr. Adams, Mr. Newell, Miss Ow( 
Lecture Association— Mr. Peterson, Mr. Westhofif, Miss Owen. 
Library— Mr. Schroeder, Mr. McGill, Miss Colby, Mr. Ridgley, M; 

Penstone. 
Music— Mr. Westhofif, Miss Wright, Mr. Newell. 
Oratorical Association — Mr. Sanford, Mr. Beyer, Miss Dole A 

McGill. 
Parents' Meetings— Miss Eyestone, Miss Robb, Miss Lee, Mr. Mi 

bradt. 
Playground— Miss Clark, Mr. Wilson, Miss Smith. 
Publicity— Mr. Ridgley, Mr. Williams, Miss Sells. ' 

Reception of New Students— Mr. WesthofT, Miss Penstone, Mi 

Coith, Miss Swainson, Miss Nind. 
Records— Mr. Gavins, Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes. \ 

Recommendations— Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes, Miss Eyestone. j 
Social Life — Miss Lummis, Miss Swainson, Miss Davis, Miss Del 
Student Activities — Mr. Adams, Mr. Howe, Miss Baker. 
Student Loan Fund — Mr. Gavins, Mr. Barger, Mr. Scott. ] 

Student Programs— Mr. Manchester, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, M 

Howe, Mr. Beyer, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Schroeder. 
Student Publications— Miss Thomasma, Mr. Beyer, Miss Hamilto^ 
Student Welfare— Miss Barton, Mr. Gavins, Mr. Russell, Mit, 

Clarke, Miss Blake. , 

Teachers College— Mr. Pricer, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Ridg 

ley, Mr. Beyer, Mr. Schroeder. 
Training School — Mr. Turner, Miss Dexheimer, Mr. Howe, Mi« 

Berry. 

Philadelphian Society— Miss Stark, Mr. Gavins, Mr. Westhofif. i 
Wrightonian Society— Mr. Beyer, Miss Wright, Mr. McDougle. 
Ciceronian Society— Mr. McGill, Mr. Barger, Mr. Scott. 
Girls' Debating Club— Miss Blake, Miss Atkin, Miss Dole. 
Country Life Club— Mr. Packard, Mr. Madden, Miss Patterson. > 
The President is ex-ofiTicio a member of all committees. 



eele, |p 

W HISTORICAL SKETCH 



m== 



r»HE ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY was founded 
i by the General Assembly February 18, 1857, to prepare teach- 
•s for the public schools of Illinois. The School was opend Oc- 
iber 5, 1857, in Major's Hall in Bloomington with three teachers 
id nineteen'students. It was the first state normal school in the 
ississippi Valley. In 1860 the school was removed to its new 
aarters, then the fmest normal school bilding in the United States. 
^^ his structure had been erected at a cost of $120,000, of which 
35,000 was paid by the state. The city of Bloomington and county 
^'1 f McLean had contributed in lands and money $141,000. 

In 1891 a training school bilding was erected, a library and 
'^*^ ymnasium in 1896, a plant house in 1905, a manual arts bilding 
^^ Qd auditorium in 1909, a new bilding to house the Training School 
'^l'- ind the University High School in 1913, a modern heating plant 
a 1916, a womans bilding in 1917. The present value of the 
ilding, grounds, and equipment is not less than $750,000. 
! For sixty years the state normal school has been doing the 
'7ork for which it was establisht. Of its twenty-seven thousand 
'^fS bdents nearly all hav taught some time in the schools of Illinois, 
ts graduates ar to be found in almost every state from Boston to 
he Golden Gate. Many hav attaind the highest eminence in edu- 
;ational work. The yearly demand for teachers who hav receivd 
^C iheir training in this school is much larger than can be supplied. 
* From 1860 until 1895 a high school was maintaind as a de- 
>artment of the Model School. Its thoro instruction in the an- 
Jient languages won high reputation. In 1906 the high school 
vas restored, but its chief emfasis is now laid upon modern science, 
igriculture, commerce and the manual arts. In 1908 was estab- 
isht a Teachers College with four-year courses leading to a pro- 
essional degree. 

The Normal University has expanded with the growth ol tne 

ml public school system. While normal schools are not the exclusiv 

l i agency for the training of teachers, yet they are the state's chief 

agents, and as such they must bild up the professional spirit, es- 

J tablish the standards, create the ideals, send out the men and 

women whose call is to educational leadership. 

The ordinary income of the institution has now reacht 
$170 000. Its regular faculty numbers sixty-three teachers. Its 
ff, annual enrollment 3396 students, besides 250 in the high school, 
.It 558 in the Elementary Training School and 677 in extension classes. 
Its courses of study hav multiplied to meet the varying needs of 
students, and to train special teachers of art, music, household 
science, manual training, agriculture, and commercial branches. 



12 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

LOCATION 

The Normal University is located at Normal, a town of 4200 
mhabitants at the intersection of the Chicago & Alton and Illi 
nois Central Railroads. The situation is helthful, the site high 
and well draind; the town is provided with excellent water 
sewers, paved streets, gas, and electric lights. Commodious homes 
and boarding houses for 800 students stand within easy walking 
distance of the school. Normal is a very desirable place of resi- 
dence for people who value educational advantages. The charter 
provides that intoxicating liquors shall never be sold within the 
limits of the town. An electric railway, with cars every ten min- 
utes, connects Normal with Bloomington, two miles to the south. 
HOW TO REACH NORMAL 

The Illinois Central and the Chicago & Alton are the only 
railroads in Normal. Whenever it is possible, students on other 
imes should buy their tickets and check their baggage thru to 
Normal. Students coming to Bloomington on the Big Four or 
Lake Erie & Western are advized to check their baggage to the 
Chicago & Alton Junction in Bloomington; they may then leave 
the train at this station and recheck their baggage to Normal at 
a cost of six cents, the price of a ticket to Normal. 

Students coming to Bloomington on the limited trains of the 
Chicago & Alton, the Big Four, the Lake Erie & Western, or 
the interurban lines of the Illinois Traction System may reach 
Normal by street cars. These run from all railroad stations to 
the Court House square, whence a transfer may be taken to the 
Park Street-South Main or Fell Avenue cars, which run to the 
Normal University. 

The fee for delivering baggage from Normal station is twenty- 
five cents; from Bloomington fifty to seventy-five cents. Baggage 
should bear a card with the owners name and address. 

BILDINGS AND EQUIPiMENT 

The Main Bilding, an imposing edifis 100x160 feet, sur- 
mounted by a clock tower, contains the main ofifises and reception 
rooms, the study hall, the society halls, and sixteen class rooms. 

The Gymnasium Bilding, 100x125 feet, constructed of Bed- 
ford limestone, contains on the first floor the gymnasium, baths, 
and dressing rooms; on the second floor rooms for the commer- 
cial department; on the third floor the biological laboratories and 
museum. 

The Library Bilding is a substantial brick structure, 80x96 
feet. It contains rooms for the department of geografy, and a 
lecture room, besides the various rooms used for library pur- 
poses. The handsome reading room, airy, well-lighted, and con- 
venient, occupies the entire second floor. 






Illinois State Normal University 13 

The Manual Arts Bilding contains a modern auditorium with 
mating for 1115 persons, a science lecture room, three laboratories 
)T chemistry and physics, four rooms for domestic economy, 
iree for the art department, and six for manual training, besides 
[Tises and storerooms. This bilding is provided with ample equip- 
lent for the preparation of special teachers of these branches. 

The new Thomas Metcalf Bilding contains a high school as- 
3mbly room 48x72 feet, with five high-school class rooms, eight 
Jhoolrooms and eight class rooms for the elementary school, a 
indergarten 28x70, laboratories for agriculture and natural sci- 
nce, four rooms for domestic science, twelv offlses, play rooms 
nd rest rooms. It is a model bilding in all its hygienic and sani- 
iry arrangements. 

The physical and chemical laboratories are supplied with 
lodern equipment and a good stock of apparatus adapted to the 
leeds of advanst students. 

The psychological laboratory is provided with an abundance 
f appliances for experiment and demonstration. 

The department of biology, because of the former location 
lere of the State Museum of Natural History, has at its disposal 
I working collection of zoological and botanical material much 
arger than that found at similar institutions. The laboratories 
ire equipt with forty-eight compound microscopes of modern 
ype, and apparatus for the preparation of permanent micro- 
icopic mounts of plant and animal tissues. The equipment for 
luman physiology is exceptionally ample. The greenhouses are 
. II valuable asset in connection with the work in botany, and new 
i Apparatus for experiments in plant life is used here by students 
[preparing to teach botany in higher schools. An ample supply of 
'field glasses is provided for bird study. 

The geografical equipment includes relief models of the 
United States and Europe, a complete set of Sydow-Habenicht 
relief maps, charts of the United States topografic, coast and 
geodetic surveys, a collection of rocks, minerals and other speci- 
mens, meteorological instruments, numerous exhibits illustrating 
industrial topics, and a large collection of pictures relating to 
this subject, including several thousand stereografs and stere- 
opticon slides. 

A school garden of two and one-fourth acres, and a spacious 
greenhouse in care of an experienced gardener, afford excellent 
facilities for experiment and instruction in horticulture and flori- 
culture. The Normal University farm of ninety-five acres is 
used for demonstration and experiment in connection with the 
courses in agriculture. It is stockt with thorobred horses, swine, 
poultry, and a dairy herd. Its sales last year exceded $12,000. 

The manual training shops are supplied with lathes, jointer, 
planer, band saw, circular saws, all driven by electric motors, 
and an abundant equipment of minor tools for wood and metal 
working. No forge work is undertaken. 



1^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The well-shaded campus of fifty-six acres contains over onf 
hundred species of trees and shrubs. Its open spaces afforc 
abundant room for tennis and other athletic sports. 

There is a valuable reference and circulating library ol 
30,000 bound volumes and 24,000 pamflets. The books have beer 
carefully selected and indext and now constitute a fairly com- 
plete working library in every department. 

The library is open eleven hours of every school day and four 
hours on Saturdays and during vacations. The librarian givs in- 
struction in the use of the library in a set of ten practical lessons. 
It is the aim of the teachers and librarian to help students to the 
use of books, and to give them the best assistance in doing their 
reference work. 

The library is supplied with the leading American periodicals. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

There ar seven literary societies connected with the school 
— the Philadelphian, the Wrightonian, the Ciceronian, the GirlsV 
Debating Club and three junior societies in the University High 
School. These afford practis in oratory, debate, dramatics, and 
parliamentary usage. The societies have well-furnisht rooms set 
aside for their use. 



CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATIONS 

New students receiv a harty welcome to the Young Men's 
and Young Women"s Christian Associations of the Normal School. 
These organizations ar vigorous and activ, and endevor to pro- 
mote the social and spiritual welfare of the students. 

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 
The purpose of this association is the cultivation of oratory, 
extempore speaking, declamation and debate. The winners of the 
annual contest in oratory and declamation receiv the Richard} 
Edwards medals, establisht in honor of the second president of the 
institution. The successful contestant in oratory represents this* 
institution in the contest held in March of each year under the 
direction of the State Leag of Normal Schools. This association 
conducts annual debates with the State Normal school at Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin. 



j Illinois State Normal University 15 

THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
This organization has general control of students' athletics 
conjunction with the director of the gymnasium. 
THE LECTURE ASSOCIATION 
Three members of the faculty, four students, the pastors of 
e various churches in Normal and the city superintendent of 
hools constitute a lecture board, to provide a course of high- 
ass lectures and concerts at low cost. The activ management 
the course is in the hands of the student members. 
MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 
The University Choral Club.— This organization meets twice 
ich week at 6 :15. The club gives three concerts each year, smg- 
g selections from standard operas, oratorios, and cantatas. 

Glee CLUBS.-Four ar organized, two for men, two for women. 
THE Orchestra.— It is the purpose of this organization to 
ve students who play upon an instrument an opportunity for 
t iractis in concerted playing. Rehersals ar held regularly and such 
1: fusic as is suitable for the social functions of the school is pre- 

I I The Band.— The Normal University Band numbers about 
ijyenty-five members. Daily instruction is given by the teachers 
f music upon the band and orchestral instruments. 

The music organizations ar under the direction of the teacn- 
rs of music. 

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 
The Dramatic Club (The Jesters) was founded in 1909, 
ts players ar drawn from the entire student body, and the casting 
if characters is determind by the Directors from work done m 
lass, on special programs, and from numbers given at the Literary 

(tijSocieties. ^, ^ , . , 

':| The Science Club holds bi-weekly meetings, at which pa- 
pers ar red dealing with soientific questions. 

The Social Science Club at its bi-weekly meetings discusses 
he social, economic, and political problems of the day. 

The Nature Study Club discusses ways and means of ex- 
ending and popularizing the nature-study movement. 

The Country Life Club devotes its weekly meetings to the 
ionsideration of topics relating to the improvement of country 
life thru the leadership or co-operation of the country school. 
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
The ViDETTE is a 16-page weekly, fild with local news, alumni 
Qotes and practical and interesting matter on school topics con- 
tributed by faculty and students. It is under the management 
of the Yidette Board, elected by the students of the various classes. 
The Index, publisht annually by the senior class, contains 
detaild information in regard to the various student organizations. 
The Alumni Quarterly is a 32-page magazine intended to 
keep alumni in touch with the life of the institution. 



I 

1 



*® Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ORGANIZATION 

The Illinois State Normal University comprizes four soho 

Ine Normal School, 

The Teachers College, 

The Elementary Training School, 

The University High School. 
The Normal School is intended to prepare teachers for grade 
elementary schools, rural schools, and village schools. It provid 
lor high-school graduates curriculums two years in length for or} 
mary teachers, for upper-grade teachers, and for special teachei 
of art, manual traming, household science, household art, agricul 
ture, commercial branches, public school music, and the kinder 
garten. One-year and two-year curriculums ar provided to prti 
pare country-school teachers, and a preparatory program fo 
mature students who wish to make up deficiencies in high-schoO 

teachers, supervizors, principals, and superintendents whoa. 
duties require a more extended preparation than the normal- 
school course It provides full four-year curriculums beyond th. 
high school, leading to the professional degree. Bachelor of Edu- 
cation. 

o.H ^^^^^^Ele^entary Training School consists of a kindergartei' 
and eight grades. It is intended to serv as a model school foi 
observation and training for students of the Normal School and 
Teachers CoHege. The school of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home witl 
435 pupils affords further facilities for training. 

The University High School is provided primarily for hold- 
ers of township scholarships who ar too young to enter tM 
Normal School or who do not intend to prepare for teachingl 
Additional students are admitted on payment of tuition. It is a 
school of observation and training for students in the Teachers 
college. The attendance is limited to 230. 

ENROLIVIENT^ 

. 7?^x?^^^ ^^^ °^ ®^^^ ^^™' ^^^®P^ ^^e summer terms, is de- 
voted to the enrolment of new students, and to the examination of 
students for advanst standing, or to complete the work of the 
preceding term. New students should be present in the morning 
to present their credentials, to register in the offis, to pay their 
term fees, to consult with the appropriate committee in regard to 
their program of studies, to enrol with the director of the gym- 
nasium, and to consult with teachers in regard to their studies, 
so far as may be desirable. Students may enrol on the Saturday 
preceding the beginning of the term. 

Students upon arriving in Normal ar advized to come directly 
to the offis of the president. 



Illinois State Normal University 17 

^CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO THE NORMAL SCHOOL 
Students ar admitted to the Normal School upon presentation 
the following evidences of scholarship : 

1. A high-school diploma. 

2. A teacher's certificate. 

3. A certificate of attendance at another state normal school. 

4. A township scholarship under the Lindly Act. This act 
provides for an annual examination in each township adapted to 
graduates of the eighth grade. Successful candidates ar awarded 
jcholarships good for four years at any state normal school in 
[llinois. 

5. A county diploma or certificate of graduation from the 
3ighth grade. 

6. A statement from proper school authorities showing that 
me or more years of high-school work has been completed. 

All students who hav done any high-school work should bring 
1 copy of their record signed by the principal. 

Persons not provided with the foregoing credentials may ar- 
range for admission by correspondence with the president. 

Young men to enter the normal school must be at least seven- 
teen years of age; young women sixteen. Students not of the 
[•equired age ar assignd to the grammar school or high school 
until they reach the maturity desired. 

To obtain free tuition, students who ar not holders of town- 
ship scholarships ar required to sign a declaration of their inten- 
tion to devote themselvs to teaching in the public schools of 
[llinois for as long a period as they attend the Normal School. 

Students may enter at any time, provided they ar compe- 
tent to take up the work then in progress. It is best to enter 
at the beginning of a term. In all but the special programs classes 
ar provided each term for students beginning the course of study. 

CREDIT FOR WORK IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 
For all work done in other state normal schools and in the 
Qniversity of Illinois, credit is given so far as such work is 
Bquivalent to our own courses. Credit for work done in other 
higher institutions is granted upon adequate proof that such work 
is a satisfactory substitute for courses offerd here. No student is 
Bxpected to mark time by repeating work well done elsewhere. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Teachers of maturity and experience may be admitted as 
[Special students, and ar permitted to take up any work for which 
they ar prepared. They may not, however, be permitted to teach 
[in the training school until they have had preliminary courses in 
general pedagogy. 



18 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS. 
Graduates of high schools with four-year courses recognized 
by the State Department of Education ar admitted to the Teachers 
College, or to any of the two-year programs (A to J) in the Normal 
School provided that the fifteen units of entrance credit that they 
offer include the following : 

Algebra 1 unit 

Geometry 1 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

*Chemistry % unit 

Zoology Vz unit 

Botany % unit 

Physiografy % unit 

Civil Government % unit 

History (General, Ancient, Medieval, English 

or American) i % units 

Literature and English Composition 3 units 

Total 10 units 

The remaining five units may be composed of any subjects that 
the high school accepts to meet its graduating requirements. 

The work above stated is the minimum in each branch. It is 
expected that each student shall have done more work in some 
of the subjects. 

Graduates of recognized high schools who hav not com- 
pleted all the work listed above may take two of the omitted half [ 
units in the regular classes in these subjects (see Program P, 
p. 45) as substitutes for two stard subjects in their regular ^■ 
program. If the student is deficient in more than two half-units ' 
of the list, he shall add these subjects to the requirements of his " 
regular program. ; 

Graduates of non-accredited high schools with full four- . 
year courses ar admitted on the same terms, and may continue ; 
in the program chosen, provided that they maintain in their / 
various studies a general average of not less than seventy-five ; 
per cent. If they fall below this average in any term, they shall < 
in the next term take such additional courses as may be arranged ' 
with the Dean. 

If high-school graduates admitted to the Normal University 
are not able to write well with ease and speed, or read distinctly 
with good expression, or use the dictionary intelligently, or pass , 
the examination in spelling, extra courses in reading, penmanship, 
spelling and dictionary work must be taken by them during their 
first year. 



A unit is the amount of work done in a preparatory subject in 180 recitation periods 
of forty minutes each, or the equivalent in laboratory or other practis. 

*Chemistry is not required for admission to any of the special curriculums C — J. 
Ihis entrance requirement if they elect physical science in their second year. 



Illinois State Normal University 19 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADVANST STANDING 

To students pursuing any of the programs outlined on pages 
6-45 an opportunity is given to pass by examination any study 
Q the program without taking the same in class. The regular 
ime for such examination is the first Monday of each term. If 
his date is not convenient, arrangement for a suitable date may 
le made with the instructor. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free to all qualified students of the required age 
yho ar preparing to teach in the schools of Illinois. A registra- 
ion fee of two dollars per term is charged all students except 
,hose holding township scholarships under the provision of the 
jindly act. For each summer term of six weeks the fee is one 
liollar. Students from other states than Illinois and students 
lot preparing to teach ar charged an additional tuition fee of 
,en dollars per term for the long terms. If within five years 
mch student from another state teaches an equivalent time in 
[llinois, the tuition is refunded. An incidental fee of $1.25 per 
erm is charged to maintain certain student organizations. 

Good furnisht rooms, large enuf for two persons, rent at from 
$2.00 to $3.00 per week. Table board in private families may be 
tiad at $4.00 to $4.50 per week. Good rooms and excellent boarding 
places ar abundant. Arrangements can be made better after ar- 
dving in Normal than by letter . 

Students not living at home are required to room at approved 
houses. A list of approved rooming houses is kept at the offls of 
the Dean of Women. A written contract is required strictly de- 
fining the terms on which rooms ar rented. 

Text Books and ordinary school stationery may be bought at 
the school book store at net wholesale cost; or books may be rented 
at twenty per cent of their ordinary retail price. Students ar ad- 
vised to own and keep the text-books in advanst courses. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

To assist worthy students in completing their course of study 
the Alumni and Faculty hav created a Students' Loan Fund, 
from which students in their senior year may borrow at a low 
rate of interest a sum not to excede one hundred fifty dollars. 

Provision is made upon the Normal University farm for 
housing and boarding a small group of students of agriculture. 
These will be afforded regular employment a few hours each day 
at good wages. Application may be made by mail. 

Many students secure employment which enables them to 
meet their expenses. For such employment address Miss Lillian 
Barton. Students should consult her before entering into any 
agreement with an employer. 



20 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

TEACHERS' BUREAU 

Thoroly traind teachers ar in demand in all the best schools 
of Illinois. Many boards of education will employ no others. 
There is a rapidly increasing demand upon the normal school^ 
for such teachers. To meet this demand more effectivly the Illi- 
nois State Normal University maintains a teachers' bureau, whose; 
purposes ar to secure for its students, free of cost, suitable posi- 
tions, and to aid school officers in selecting efficient teachers. 
Students, as a rule, do not expect employment without a personal 
visit; it is hoped that the expense of such visit may be avoided, 
unless there is some prospect of employment. 

GRADUATION 

Candidates for graduation shall, at the beginning of the year 
in September, file with the President the program of studies they 
desire to follow during the senior year. This program must ac-^ 
cord with the general daily programs for the various terms and 
the rules stated on pages 24-25. If the student desires to make, 
substitutions not provided for by the general rules, his request 
must be approved by the proper committee of the faculty. 

Candidates for graduation may enrol in the senior class at' 
the beginning of the winter term provided they lack of graduation" 
fewer than twelv credits. 

No person may receiv the diploma of this institution unless! 
he has completed a full year (12 credits) of resident work. Alii 
candidates for graduation shall write an acceptable thesis upon 
some educational theme. The subject shall be reported to the) 
hed of the proper department at the opening of the Fall term.; 
The thesis shall be completed and handed in twelv weeks before th«' 
graduation. I 

Students who lack no more than two credits of completing- 
the course of study may participate in the Commencement func-5 
tions in June and receiv their diplomas upon the completion of^ 
their work in the ensuing summer term. 

Candidates for graduation should see that all conditions and: 
deficiencies ar removed by the end of the eighth week of the' 
spring term. ; 

ADVANST STANDING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. 

Graduates of this institution ar regularly admitted to junior 
standing in the University of Illinois. Students who wish to 
prepare for teaching in such city high schools as require university 
graduation of their teachers, if alredy qualified to enter the fresh- 
man class at the university, may profitably spend the first two 
years in the careful professional training that the Normal School 
affords. 



Illinois State Normal University 21 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

The Normal School provides two summer terms of six weeks 
jh for activ teachers and for students who wish to continue 
leir studies during the summer. The programs consist chiefly 
)f the regular courses in the various subjects. The daily pro- 
gram is so arranged that the student recites twice per day in the 
5ame subject, thus completing a regular twelv-week course in six 
Ijveeks. All grades of the training school ar in session, affording 
'nodel lessons for observation and discussion and opportunity for 
Dractis teaching. Especial prominence is given to music, drawing, 
construction work, modeling, manual training, and the household 
irts, to the natural sciences, to the common branches as outlined 
:n the Illinois State Course of Study, and to the special courses 
required in the examination for state teachers' certificates. Credit 
is given for all satisfactory work and recorded on the book of the 
institution. A special summer-school announcement is issued in 
March. 

The large attendance of the summer school (2577 in the 
summer of 1916) makes it possible to provide excursions, con- 
certs, lectures and other forms of instruction and entertainment 
scarcely possible at institutions of limited attendance or less 
fortunately adapted to summer study. 

A similar mid-spring term will begin April 29, 1918. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The Normal School requires for its courses a good degree of 
maturity and scholarship, quite as much as that attaind by grad- 
uates of our best high schools with four-year conrses. Accord- 
ingly the standard two-year curriculums of the Normal School ar 
pland for students of such preparation. Besides the standard 
curriculums others ar regularly taught to supply the needs of 
that large body of students whose preparation is not up to the 
standard named above. In the standard curriculum twenty-six 
credits ar required for graduation. By a "credit" is ment the 
amount of work done in a given subject requiring daily preparation 
in a term of twelv weeks by a typical student carrying four studies 
and reciting five times per week in each. To complete the required 
curriculum the attendance required of the typical student is six 
regular terms of twelv weeks and one summer term of six weeks. 

The regular curriculums of study ar: 

A. A two-year curriculum (26 credits) to prepare teacher? of 
upper grades. 

B. A two-year curriculum for teachers of lower grades. 

C. A two-year kindergarten-primary curriculum for teachers 
of the kindergarten and of the first two primary grades. 



22 Annual Catalog and Course of Study ,m 

D-J. Two-year curriculums to prepare special teachers of 
Music, Manual Training, Art and Design, Household Art, Domestic 
Science, Agriculture, and Commercial branches. 

K. A four-year Teachers College curriculum to prepare high- 
school teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents. 

Graduates of four-year high schools who hav the specific preparation, set forth 
on page 19 and other students of equal preparation ar admitted to the foregoing curricu- 
lums without condition. 

Mature students whose preparation falls below the equivalent of four years of 
high-school work and who wish to enter upon any of the foregoing curriculums may 
arrange with the president or dean to take from the preparatory program, (program P on 
p. 44), such courses as ar needed to complete the entrance requirements. All such students 
must, before graduation, be credited with fifteen units of entrance credit, in addition to 
the regular credits of the curriculum selected. 

L. A three-year curriculum for students who hav had the 
equivalent of three years of high-school work. This leads to the 
same normal-school diploma as programs A to J. 

M. A one-year curriculum for students who hav completed 
the tenth grade and wish to engage in teaching country schools 
after a year's study. 

N. A similar two-year curriculum for graduates of the eighth 
grade. 

Students who complete M or N ar recommended for third-grade teachers' certifi- 
cates under the new certificating law. 

0. A three-year curriculum to follow M for students who 
expect to secure the regular normal-school diploma. Students 
who hav completed N may continue with curriculum 0, but must' 
take, before graduating, enuf additional work from program P to^ 
make a total of fifteen units of entrance credit and twenty-six; 
term-credits of normal-school work. i 

Students who hav completed M or N and wish to secure the diploma from any of 
the curriculums, C to K, should arrange with the President or Dean for the additional' 
work to be taken from program P. 

P. A preparatory program, three years or less in length, to 
enable mature students to supply the deficiencies in their high-' 
school preparation. 

Holders of first-grade teachers' certificates originally granted; 
before July 1, 1914, with partial high-school preparation, may' 
enter curriculum L. They may, however, be required to take add!-; 
tional courses in English, History, or other branches according; 
to the deficiency of their high-school preparation. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certificates who hav taught ' 
two years may enter upon program L on the same terms. 

Other holders of second-grade certifiates and holders of third- ' 
grade certificates who hav taught one year may be admitted to 
section M or section P. 

Students ar designated by the curriculum they ar pursuing ' 
as belonging to Section C, Section D, etc. The year in the cur- 
riculum in which most of their work lies is designated by an expo- 
nent as A*, A\ etc. 



Illinois State Normal University 23 

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

It is the duty of the State Normal University to prepare every 
find of teacher required for the public schools of Illinois. 

The needs of the schools ar set forth in the new law of 
913, governing Teachers' Certificates. These certificates may 
>e issued to candidates who hav past the examinations prescribed 
)y the State Examining Board, or to those who hav done a re- 
% Quired amount of work in "recognized" normal schools or other 
ligher institutions. 

Accordingly the State Normal University provides the spe- 
lific programs required for the various kinds of certificates. 

Graduates from curriculums A to L and from curriculum ar 
pl^ entitled to receiv a first-grade county elementary certificate good 
tki for three years and renewable indeflnitly. 

Students who hav completed the work of the junior year in 
M any of these curriculum^ may receiv the second-grade county ele- 
mentary certificate at the option of the county superintendent of 



rjc; 



id; 



ichools. 

Students completing M or N may receiv a third-grade county 
lelementary certificate under the same condition. 

The six-week courses required for renewal of these certifi- 
cates are offerd in the mid-spring term and the summer terms. 

The Kindergarten Primary certificate, good for two years 
land renewable indefinitly, may be obtaind by completing curric- 

Special certificates, good for two years and renewable mden- 
nitly, may be obtaind after completing curriculums D to J in Music, 
Art, Manual Training, Domestic Science, Domestic Art, Agricul- 
ture and Commercial branches. 

County high-school certificates, good for three years and 
renewable indeflnitly, may be obtaind after completing three or 
more years of the Teachers College program, providing courses be 
chosen in accordance with the requirements of the Examining 
Board. 

County Supervizors' certificates may be obtaind only by 
—.examination in English, educational psychology, the history of 
^"- education, and school administration. The Normal Univers.Ly 
,. offers extended and thoro courses in these subjects. 
■^ State Elementary certificates and State High-School certifi- 
cates are issued to teachers of due preparation and long experi- 
ence in teaching who pass an examination in English, educational 
^ psychology, and principles and methods of teaching. The State 
'^ Normal University offers adequate courses in these subjects in 
both the regular and summer terms. 

For the State Supervizors' certificate is required graduation 
from a normal school and an examination in English, educational 
psychology, sociology, the history of education, and school man- 
agement, administration, and supervizion. 



24 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

RULES RELATING TO STUDIES AND 
CONDUCT 

1. Every new student is expected at the beginning to choose^' 
one of the various curriculums and to follow this curriculum- 
as closely as is practicable except where electiv substitutes ar 
specifically allowd. 

2. Variations from the regular program chosen ar per- 
mitted to special students, and to others if there be special need 
of such change. All individual programs involving substitutions 
must be approved by the President or the Dean. 

3. Students who hav become irregular in their programs 
or who contemplate taking electivs should study carefully the 
daily programs on pages 49-53. All irregular programs should 
be approved by one of the faculty committee on student pro- 
grams (page 10). 

4. No substitution may be allowd for the common branches 
unless the student gives satisfactory evidence of proficiency in 
such branches. In doutful cases an examination may be required. 

5. No substitution for any of the natural sciences may be 
allowd unless the student's previous study in the omitted branch 
is equal to the requirements for admission as shown on page 18. 

6. Electivs may be chosen from any of the programs on 
pp. 26-45 provided the student is qualified to pursue the subject 
with profit. This permission may be granted by the President 
or Dean. Electivs chosen from program P must be of half- 
unit value if substituted in programs A to L. 

7. The electivs allowd include five years* work In Latin, ^ 
three years' work in German, and courses in method for students 'j 
who hav alredy attaind considerable proficiency in these lan- 
guages. For the first year's work in Latin or German one credit 
is allowd, for the second year two credits, for all work beyond 
the second year and for the courses in method full credit. 

8. No electiv credit is allowd for a single term in cooking or 
sewing; for two terms one credit is given; for three terms three 
credits. 

9. No credit is allowd for less than one hundred twenty 
hours of bench work. 

10. All classes recite daily in the regular terms. In the mid- 
spring and summer terms of six weeks two recitations per day ar 
held in most subjects, thus enabling the student to complete the 
regular twelv-week courses. 

11. Four hours per week of gymnasium practis is required of 
all first-year students. Students who cannot profitably take this 
work because of age or physical disability may substitute electivs. 
Ten library lessons ar given each term to entering students. 

12. Thirty minutes per day ar devoted at General Exercises 
to the consideration of topics of interest to prospectiv teachers. 



Illinois State Normal University 25 

Ul members of the school ar expected to attend. One day per 
veek the school at this hour is divided into small sections for 
)ractis in platform speaking. All students ar required to partici- 
)ate in this work. 

13. Every student Is expected to take not more than four 
najor subjects (or their equivalent), nor less than three, not 
50unting physical training. Students whose standing in all sub- 
sets is above 80 may take a hevier program, with the approval of 
he Dean. Students who work for their board ar not permitted to 
ake a full schedule. 

14. If a student fails to keep pace with his class in any study 
le may be transf erd to a lower section in such study or be re- 
luired to drop the study. 

15. If a student fails to carry a study after continuing thru 
tialf the term he is required to repeat the study at the earliest op- 
portunity. 

16. If a student fails to complete a course in which his work 
is of good quality, he should complete such course in the next 
term in which he is in attendance and the course offerd. Other- 
wise the entire course is to be repeated at the earliest opportunity. 

17. A student who fails in any term to make a passing grade 
in two major studies, or their equivalent, is placed upon probation 
for the succeding term, and in case he fails to carry two majors 
in the succeding term, he shall not be permitted to continue his 
studies until one year has elapst. This rule may be suspended in 
the case of any student by a majority vote of the faculty. 

18. Other students may be placed upon probation by the 
faculty or by the Committee on Disciplin. Such probation shall 
Qot excede one term. Students on probation may not take part in 
any public contest or exhibition, athletic, musical, dramatic, or 
oratorical 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Term fees and tuition ar to be paid the first day of the term. 
If the student leaves school within two weeks (one week in sum- 
mer), fees ar refunded. If a student paying tuition leaves school 
during the first half of the term, half of the tuition is refunded. 

Students ar enrold in their classes upon presentation of their 
term-fee or tuition receipt, or evidence that they hold township 
scholarships. 

Grades for scholarship indicate as follows: Above 90, dis- 
tinguisht proficiency; 86-90, excellent; 81-85, good; 76-80, average; 
70-75, fair work below the average; below 70 indicates poor work 
and the student must repeat the course. The median is 80. 

Students ar expected, whenever it is possible, to enter school 
at the beginning of the term and remain to the close, to attend 
their classes regularly, and to conform to the various requirements 
that hav been found necessary to the orderly and successful work- 
ing of the institution and to the welfare of its students. 



26 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM A 

For Teachers of Upper Grades 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
Teaching Process 
Arithmetic 2 
Grammar 1 
Drawing 1 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter 
Physiology 9 
Geografy 4, 5, or 6 
Reading 4, 7, or 11 
* Music 2 or 3 
Physical Training 



Spring 
Psychology 2 
Nature Study 7 
Geografy 2 
Reading Method 
*Bookbinding or 
*Bench Work 
Physical Training 



Summer Term 
General Method 
Any electiv study 

SECOND YEAR 
School Manag ment Economics 2 
Science of Discourse * History 4, or 
* Political Science or * Physical Science, 

Color and Design * Industrial Art 
Teaching Teaching 

Dictionary work, spelling, and writing ar required the second '\ 
term of all students found deficient in these branches. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 24 may be 
taken insted of the stard courses. f 



Prin. of Education 
Literature Method 
or *Biology 10, or 
* Color Practis 
Teaching 



Illinois State Normal University 



27 



CURRICULUM B 

For Teachers of Lower Grades 



Fall 
reaching Process 
•Reading 4 
Physiology 9 
Music 2 or 3 
Physical Training 



Spring 

General Method 
Advanst Nature 

Study 7 
Primary Geografy 
Primary Music 
Physical Training 



78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 
Winter 
Psychology 2 
Arithmetic 1 
(Reading Method 
(Geografy 2 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 
Method in Language 
•Science of Discourse 

SECOND YEAR 

Prin. of Education School Management, 

* Grammar 1, or or Kindergarten 

* Physical Science, or Economics 2 or 
*Art Appreciation Sociology 
Teaching * Playground Manage- 
ment 

Teaching 

Spelling and writing ar required of all students found defi- 
cient in these branches. These must be taken the second term. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 46 may be 
taken insted of the stard courses. 

Dictionary work and special drill in phonics and reading ar 
required of all students deficient in these subjects. 



Literature Method 
* History Method 7 
(Primary Handwork 
Color 
Teaching 



28 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM C 

Kindergarten -Primary Program 

For Teachers of the Kindergarten and the 
First Two Grades of the Elementary School 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Winter Spring 



i 



Kindergarten Theory 
Kindergarten Tech- 
nics 
Kindergarten Obser- 
vation 
Nature Study 7 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 



Kindergarten Theory Kindergarten Tech- 
Kindergarten Tech- nics 

nics Primary Handwork o 

Primary Handwork orKindergarten Practis 
Kindergarten Practis Psychology 
Physiology 9 Primary Music 

Music 2 Color 

Physical Training Physical Training 

Summer Term 
General Method 
Arithmetic Method ] 



SENIOR YEAR 

Educ. Psychology Sociology Prin. of Education 

Kindergarten Theory Kindergarten Theory * Primary Geografy 
Kindergarten Practis Reading Method *Blackboard Drawi 

Literature Method Geografy 2 'Playground Managed 

Teaching ment 

Teaching 

This program is pland for high-school graduates and to meei 
the requirements of the new law for the certificating of teachers. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 24 may h 
taken insted of the stard courses. 

Students taking this curriculum should be able to sing and 
play simple music. 

Students ar advized not to begin this course unless they ex- 
pect to attend two consecutiv years. 

Spelling and writing must be taken by all students found de- 
ficient in these branches. These must be taken the second or third 
terms. 



Illinois State Normal University 



29 



hi 
worli. 



Fall 

^#usi3 2 
'hysiology 9 
leading 2 
literature 5 
'hysical Training 



CURRICULUM D 

Special Curriculum in Music 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 
JUNIOR YEAR 
Winter Spring 

Music 4 Music 3 

Teaching Process Psychology 2 



m 



•Science of Discourse Sociology 
Reading Method * Public Speaking 

Sound Physical Training 

Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Reading 3 
General Method 



itiOQ 

^^'^'•iusic 5 



SENIOR YEAR 

Music 6 
'»#LTterature 6 -Prin. of Education 

The Speaking Voice *Economics 
reaching Teaching 



Music 7 

•School Management 

•Literature 9 

Teaching 



Students who ar taking approved courses in instrumental 

nusic parallel to this program may arrange with the Dean to 

n\ lubstitute the same for the stard courses above. 

Other electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 24. 

Students found deficient in spelling or writing must take extra 
vork in these branches during the second or third terms. 



Dgil 



leys 



iri 



30 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM E 

Special Manual Training Curriculum 



78 Weeks— 27 y2 Credits 
FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Bench Work 
Mechanical Drawing 
Teaching Process 



Fall 
Bench Work 
Drawing 1 
Design 

Science of Discourse Geometry 2 or 1 
Economics 2 Gymnastics 

Physical Training 

Summer Term 
Pottery 
Bookbinding 
General Method 



Spring 
Lathe Work 
Mechanical Drawing 
Psychology 2 
Elementary Wood- 
work and Carpenti 
Physical Training 



Organization of 

Manual Training 
Teaching 
Machine Drawing 
Art Metal 



SECOND YEAR 

Factory Method Fur- * Industrial History 
niture Construction Architectural Draw. 
Teaching Teaching 

School Management 'Furniture Designin 
Primary Handwork and Construction 
* History of Manual * Principles of Educa 
Training (% credit) tion 



Furniture Designing and Construction may be taken as 
major or minor. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 24 may b 
substituted for the stard courses. 

Students pursuing this curriculum who ar found to be deficien 
in penmanship, spelling, English composition, or oral expressioi 
ar required to take special courses in these subjects during th< 
winter term or spring term. 



rawi 



rpei 



ilory 



Illinois State Normal University 



31 



CURRICULUM F 

Special Curriculum in Art and Design 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



Fall 
erspectiv 5 
jOlor Theory 
rim. Handwork 
»rin. of Design 
hysiology 9 
hysical Training 



irt Metal 
Jostume Design 
lome Decoration 
Tin. of Education 
teaching 



isip 

tiOD 

Ik 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 

Light and Shade 6 
Art Appreciation 
Economics 2, or 
Teaching Process 
Mechanical Drawing 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 
Nature Study 
General Method 

SECOND YEAR 

Pottery 
Industrial Art 
Teaching 
Cast Drawing 



Spring 
Color Practis 
Thin Wood 4 
Psychology 
Blackboard Drawing 
Commercial Design 
Physical Training 



Bookbinding 
* Department Assist- 
ant 
Art Organization 
Painting 
Teaching 



Students pursuing this curriculum who ar found to be de- 
■icient in penmanship, spelling, English composition, or oral ex- 
gfljj ^ression ar required to take special courses in these subjects during 
^jjjj hQ winter term or spring term. 



32 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM D— F 

Special Curriculum in Music and Art 
116 Weeks— 38 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall 
Perspectiv 
Color Theory 
Music 2 

Prin. of Design 
Physical Training 
Teaching Process 



i 



Winter 
Music 3 
Music 4 

Light and Shade 
Art Appreciation 
Economics 2, or 
Physiology 9 
Primary Handwork 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 
Nature Study 
General Method 



Spring 
Color Practis 
Thin Wood 
Psychology 
Blackboard Drawing 
Commercial Design 
Physical Training 



Art Metal 
Music 5 
Reading 2 
Teaching 



SECOND YEAR 

Music 6 
Cast Drawing 
Pottery 

* Science of Dis- 
course 



THIRD YEAR 

Costume Design and Industrial Art 
Home Decoration Sociology, or 
^Literature 6 * Reading 3 

*The Speaking Voice Sound 

Reading Method 
Teaching 



Music 7 
Bookbinding 
Painting 

Prin. of Education 
Department Assist- 
ant 



I 



Mechanical Drawing 
Teaching 
•Literature 9 
Art Organization 



Illinois State Normal University 



33 



CURRICULUM G 

Special Curriculum in Household Art 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Winter Spring 

Hasehold Art 1 Household Art 2 Household Art 3 

Tiching Process Psychology 2 General Method 

Sence of Discourse Commercial Geografy Economics 2 



Pnciples of Design Drawing 1 
Gmnastics 1 Gymnastics 2 

Summer Term 

Physiology 9 
* Electiv 



or Sociology 
Color 
Gymnastics 3 



Fall 
Eusehold Art 4 
Fin. of Education 
)r Teaching 
C5tume Design 
tme Decoration 
Ixtils 



SECOND YEAR 

Winter 
Household Art 5 
School Management 

or Teaching 
* Industrial Art 
*Electiv 



Spring 
Household Art 6 
History of Education 

or Teaching 
Industrial History 
*Electiv 



CURRICULUM H 

Special Curriculum in Household Science 
78 Weeks— 27 1/2 Credits 



Fall 
liusehold Science i 
'^lemistry 1 
'■"-jaching Process 
iiommercial Geog- 
rafy 6 
liysie^'.l Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Household Science 2 
Chemistry 2 
Psychology 



Spring 
Household Science 
Chemistry 3 
General Method 



Science of Discourse Sociology 
Physical Training Physical Training 



Summer Term 

Economics 2 
School Management 

SECOND YEAR 



jusehold Science 4 Household Science 5 Household Science 6 
'lemistry 4 Chemistry 8 

jtany 6 Physiology 22 

'inciples of Educa- Teaching 

tion, or Teaching 



History of Education 
* Sanitation 23 
Teaching 



34 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM G— H 

Three- Year Curriculum in Home Economics 

Household Art and Household Science 
116 Weeks— 38 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Winter Spring 

Household Art 1 Household Art 2 Household Art 3 

Principles of Design Drawing Color 

Science of Discourse Commercial Geografy Sociology 
Teaching Process Psychology 2 General Method 

Physical Training Physical Training Physical Training 

Summer Term 
Chemistry 1 
* Industrial Art 



SECOND YEAR ; 

Household Science 1 Household Science 2 Household Science! 



Household Art 4 
Costume Design 
Home Decoration 
Textils 

or Teaching 



Household Art 5 
School Management 
Chemistry 2 



Household Art 6 
*Economics 2 or 

Teaching 
Chemistry 3 



THIRD YEAR 

Household Science 4 Household Science 
Chemistry 4 Chemistry 8 

Botany 6 Physiology 22 

Teaching, or Prin. of Education 

*Electiv or Teaching 



5 Household Science 
History of Educati( 
* Sanitation 23 
Teaching 
or Electiv 



Substitutions for the stard courses may be made with the s- 
proval of the president or dean. 



IJ 



II 



Illinois State Normal University 



35 



CURRICULUM I 



Four-Year Curriculum in Agriculture 



FIRST YEAR 

Fall Winter 

Imal Husbandry 1 Animal Husbandry 
jlmistry 1 Chemistry 2 

^(logy 3 or Bot. 6 Zoology 4 
ksnce of Discourse Teaching Process 
sical Training Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Botany 5 
General Method 



Spring 
Horticulture 1 
Chemistry 3 
Psychologj^ 2 
Economics 
Physical Training 



onomy 1 
nJM lemistry 5 
Hool Management 
*'iaching 
*;iysics 4 



SECOND YEAR 

Agronomy 2 Agronomy 3 

* Chemistry 6 * Chemistry 7 
Commercial Geografy Principles of Educ. 
•Teaching 'Teaching 

* Physics 5 * Mechanics 



t '' Pys 



•onomy 4 
lemistry 4 

•Vsics 7 
Blany 18 



THIRD YEAR 

Agronomy 5 
•Chemistry 8 
Physics 8 
Botany 18 and 19 

FOURTH YEAR 



Dairy Husbandry 1 
Horticulture 2 
Physics 9 
Botany 19 



Animal Husbandry 4 
•Animal Husbandry 5 
Zoology 15 
•Teaching 



onomy 6 Agronomy / 

limal Husbandry 3 * Agronomy 8 
kogy 13 Zoology 14 

. paching •Teaching 

Courses in Literature, History, and Civil Government ar 
i Bommended as electiv substitutes. 

Three terms of Practis Teaching ar required. 

The normal-school diploma will be given at the end of the 
f/st two years; the teachers' college diploma at the end of the 
liiJirth year. 



36 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM J 

Commercial Course for Teachers 
78 Weeks— 26% Credits 



1 



Fall 

Accounting 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 

Penmanship 

Psychology 

Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewi'iting 
Business Corre- 
spondence 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 
General Method 
Commercial Geografy 



Spring 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
H. S. Problems 
Physical Training 



SECOND YEAR 

Fall Winter 

Shorthand Shorthand 

Typewriting Typewriting 

History of Commerce Commercial Arith- 
Commercial Law 1 metic 

Practis Teaching Commercial Law 2 

Practis Teaching 

Note: Offis Methods and Appliances 
second year of Typewriting. 

List of Credits 



Spring 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Economics 
Salesmanship and 

Advertizing 
Practis Teaching ] 

will be included in' 



Business Correspondence . . V2 

Accounting 3 

Shorthand 6 

Typewriting 3 

Commercial Law iVa 

Commercial Geografy 1 

Psychology 1 

Pedagogy 1 

Practis Teaching 3 



History of Commerce . . . 

General Method j 

Commercial Arithmetic . 

Salesmanship 

Penmanship 

Physical Education . . . . 
Economics 



Students entering with high-school units in any of the 
commercial branches may modify this program under advi- 
ment. 



Illinois State Normal University 37 



THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The purpose of the Teachers College is to afford adequate 

,]fessional preparation for high-school teachers, principals, 

erintendents, and special teachers. Its programs provide for 

,„ years' work in the Junior College, two years in the Senior 

' High-school graduates having the special preparation set 
h on page 9 ar admitted to the Junior College and a program 
m of study four years in length. (50 credits.) 
Students in the Normal School may transfer to the Junior 

Olege if they hav completed fifteen units of work of secondary 

^^Normal-School graduate's ar admitted to the Senior College 
[ to a curriculum two years in length. (24 credits ) 

College graduates ar admitted to the Senior College and to a 
sicial professional curriculum one year in length. (14 credits, 
e ht of them in education and teaching.) . .i,^ 

All students completing the prescribed curriculum receiv the 
dTee of Bachelor of Education. 

Students completing the curriculum of the Junior College may 
reiv the normal-school diploma, if their credits mclude five 
tmis in education and two terms of teaching with a grade not 

l(7er than 80. , , . rpuo. 

The program of the Teachers College is largely electiv. The 
ectiv courses fall into three lists, designated C, B, and A. 

First-year students may select from List C. 

Second-year students may select from List C or List B. 

Students in the Senior College must select two of their four 
cirses from List A, the others may be chosen from List C or 
t B. No course in List A may be taken unless its prerequisit 
the Junior College hav been completed. College graduate 
r.y choose their electivs from any list, or from the normal-sohool 
grams approved by the president. Two of the three terms 
Ipractis teaching listed in the Senior College may be taken m 
ts second year. One must be taken in the last year. 

Students in the Teachers College ar required to elect some 
njor subject in which they ar to make a least nine cied ts 
', student is expected to take also such other "o^^f ^'f «^ 
t his major as ar prescribed by the hed of the departrnent m 
nioh the major lies. As a rule the electivs chosen should run 

""studeX'in the Teachers College ar ^"^ect to the same 

ineral requirements relating to platform speaking physical 

laining, attendance at general exercizes, and general decorum 

i apply to normal-school students. , „j ri<. 

Students admitted to the Teachers College who ar found de- 

:ient in writing, spelling, composition or oral .expression ar 

quired to take a special course in such subject durmg the second 

rm. 



38 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



TEACHERS COLLEGE CURRICULUM, K 

150 Weeks— 50 Credits 

The required studies in pedagogy scheduled for the secw 
year may be deferd until the third year. 

Two substitutes may be taken for stard courses to make i 
conditions. See page 19. 



Fall 

Elem. Psychology 
* Music, or 
Physiology 9 
Physical Training 
*Electiv G 
Electiv G 



Fall 
General Method 
* Reading 4 
Electiv B or C 
Electiv B or G 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Grammar 1, or 
H. S. Problems 
Physiology, or 
Music 

Physical Training 
*Electiv G 
Electiv G 

Summer Term 

Economics 

Electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Winter 
School Management 
* Public Speaking 
Electiv B or G 
Electiv B or G 



Spring 
Teaching Process, oi 
H. S. Problems, or 
Grammar 1 

* Drawing 1 
riiysical Training 

* Electiv G 
Electiv C 



Spring 
Prin. of Educriion ' 
Science of Dis30UP8<* 
Electiv B or G 
Electiv B or G 



THIRD YEAR 
School Administra- School Administra- School Administra- 
tion, or tion, or tion, or 
Educ. Psychology, or Educational Psych, or Ethics, or 
Hist, of Education History of Education History of Educati^ 
Electiv A, B or C Electiv A, B or G Electiv A, B or C 
Electiv A Electiv A Electiv A 
Electiv A Electiv A Electiv A 



Teaching 
Electiv A, B or C 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



FOURTH YEAR 
Teaching 
Electiv A, B or G 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



Teaching 
Electiv A, B or C 
Electiv A 
Eleetiv A 



, Two electivs, B or C, may be substituted for one electiv A. 
eluded from all classes in senior college subjects. 



First year students ar 



ELECTIV 



Illinois State Normal University 

COURSES IN THE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE 



39 



List c — Junior College 



Fall 
Wetic 1 or 2 

Isics 4 
mis try 1 
logy 3a 
igrafy 3 
itical Science 
;rature 5 
in Method 
man 1 

fnestic Science i 
nestic Art 
\imal Husbandry 1 
[Mjhanical Drawing 
Diwing 4 and 7 



Winter 
Geometry 1 or 2 
Physics 5 
Chemistry 2 
Zoology 4 
Geografy 4 
Political Parties 
Literature Method 



Spring 

Algebra 
Mechanics 
Chemistry 3 
Botany 5 
Geografy 7 or 6 
Municipal Problems 
4 Hist, of Eng. Language 



Latin-Eng. EtymologyCaesar-Cicero Method 



German 2 
Domestic Science 2 
Domestic Art 
Animal Husbandry 2 



German 3 
Domestic Science 3 
Domestic Art 
Horticulture 



Mechanical Drawing Bench Work 
Drawing 5 and 6 Drawing 8 

List B — Junior College 



jilege Algebra 

G;mistry 4 

B,any 6 

G)grafy 11 

Hitory 11 

*i)ciology 

Lerature 6 

Li,in 10 

Grman 4 

Te Speaking Voice 

Emestic Art 

Emestic Science 

Aronomy 1 

A chine Drawing 

I sign 



Trigonometry 
Chemistry 6 
Biolog:^ Metho*^ 
Geografy 12 
Histoi , Method 
•Economics 4 
Hist, of Eng. Liter. 
* Latin 11 
German 5 
Dramatic Reading 
Domestic Art 
Domestic Science 
Agronomy 2 
Furniture 
Industrial Art 
Art Appreciation 



Analytics 

Taxonomic Biology 
Geografy 13 
History 5 

*Amer. Indus. Hist. 
8 Literature 9 
•Latin 12 
German 6 

Adv. Public Speaking 
Domestic Art 
Domestic ScionCv^ 
Agronomy 3 
Architectural Draw. 
Blackboard Drawing 
Painting 



List A — Senior College 



Iiiysics 8 
(emistry 5 
*|reneral Zoology 12 
licteriology 
f.ntomology 
i'lant Morfology 
I'lant Pathology 
tore Study 21 
'jrelogy 

iocial Problems 
1 story 13 
ilistory 16 
American Poetry 10 
Cngl'"sh Poetry 13 
itin Comnosition 
3rman 7 



Physics 9 
Chemistrv 6 
•General Zoology 12 
Advanst Physiology 
tOrganic Evolution 
Plant Physiology 
•Plant Pathology 
Nature Study 22 
•Climatology 
rEconomics 3 
•History 14 
+History 17 
•English Drama 14 
tBrowning 14 
tTacitus 
German 8 



Physics 10 
Chemistry 7 
•General Zoology 12 
Sanitation 

tEconomic Entomol. 
t Plant Ecology 
•Bacteriology 
Nature Study 23 
•Cons. Nat. Resources 
tEng. Indus. Hist. 
•History 15 
tHistory 18 
•The Novel 12 
tl9th Century Prose 
tDe Senectute 
German 9 



•Taught 1917-18 and in alternate years thereafter. 
t Taught 1918-19 and in alternate years thereafter. 



40 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



Fall 
Arithmetic 2 
Grammar 2 
Geografy 1 or 3 
•Reading 2 
Physical Training 



•Algebra 3 
Psychology 2 
Zoology 3, or 
Botany 6 
Color 
'Design 

Economics 2 
Physics 2 or 4 
'Literature 2 
Teaching 



'Drawing 1 
'Botany 5 or 10 
Physical Training 



CURRICULUM L 

The Three-Year Curriculum 

114 Weeks— 38^ Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Arithmetic 1 'Algebra 2 

'Grammar 3 (6 wks.) Science of Discours 
'Geografy 2 (6 wks.) * Music 2 or 3 
Teaching Process 
U. S. History A 
Physical Training 
tSpelling or Writing 

Summer Term 

Dictionary Work 
Orthografy 
Reading Method 
Any electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 1 
General Method 
'Reading 3, or 
'Zoology 4, or 
'Industrial Art 

THIRD YEAR 

Chemistry 1 

or Physics 5 

'Shakspere 

Teaching 

School Management 



'Geometry 2, or 
'Public Speaking 
Physiology 9 
Civics 2 
Teaching 



*Physics 3 
or Chemistry 1 
'Modern History 1' 
Geografy 4, 5 or 6 
Prin. of Education 



No student may omit both Literature 2 and Shakspere. 
tSpelhng and writing ar to be taken only if student is d 
ncient. 

Electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 24. 
If Latm or German is taken thruout the course, six majc 
may be omitted. 

This program is pland for teachers of upper grades. Teache 
01 lower grades should choose substitutes from programs B or ( 



Illinois State Normal University 



41 



CURRICULUM M 

The ONE-YE/m Curriculum for Country Teachers 
For Graduates of the Tenth Grade 



36 Weeks — 13 Credits 



♦iisuration 
G'grafy 10 
a:S. History 2 
P7sical Training 
Mvics 12 
*]liture Study 1 
•iading 1 
*fawing 3 

jsic 2 
\'imary Handwork 
•jictionary Work 



Grammar 4 
Country School 

Problems 
Agricultural Nat. 

Study 
•Reading 1 
* Primary Handwork 



Country School 
Teaching 

Arithmetic 1 

Physiology 8 

Physical Training 

*U. S. History 3 

*Orthografy 

•Elementary Physics * Music 2 

•Manual Training * Reading Method 

•Household Art •Literature Method 

^ ^ * Household Science * Bench Work 

, Students should elect one stard subject (or pair) in addition 
tdthe required subjects at the top of the list. Other electivs may 
b taken insted of the required subjects if approved by the Dean. 
N pupil may be certified as having completed this year's work 
u il the pupil has shown by examination or class-room work, 
pificiency in the branches required for a third-grade teachers' 
c tificate. 

CURRICULUM N 

Two-Year Curriculum for Country Teachers 
For Graduates of the Eighth Grade 

72 Weeks— 25 Credits 



iNture Studr 
Mnsuration 
umposition 
.(i'thografy and 
iPhonics 
llysical Training 



(jiografy 14 
<jvics 12 
I S. History 2 
Isading 1 



FIRST YEAR 

Elementary Physics 
Percent, and Book- 
keeping 
Drawing 3 
Physical Training 
•Domestic Science 
•Manual Training 

SECOND YEAR 

Country School 
Organization 
Physiology 8 
U. S. History 3 
•Household Art 
•Manual Training 
•Agriculture 
•Design 



Agri. Nature Study 
Geografy 9 
Country School 

Teaching 
Primary Handwork 
Physical Training 
Music 



Method in Reading 
and Literature 

Country School 
Problems 

Grammar 4 

Arithmetic 1 



42 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM O 

For students who hav completed curriculums M or N jj 
desire the regular normal-school diploma. 

114 Weeks— 38 Credits 



Fall 
Grammar 5 
Algebra 4 
Zoology 3 
*Geografy 4 
Gymnastics 3 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Public Speaking 
Algebra 5 
Physiology 9 
*Zoology 4 
* Elementary Physics 



Summer Term 
Any two electiv courses 



Spring 
Reading 2 
Algebra 6 
Botany 5 
Rhetoric 3 



Ancient History 
Psychology 2 
G ometry 3 
•Botany 6 or 
*Debating 



SECOND YEAR 

Medieval History 
literature 1 
General Method 
Geometry 4 



Modern History 
Reading 3 
*Geografy 5 or 6 

* Geometry 5 

* Drawing 7 and 8 ^' 



Political Science 
Physics 2 or 4 
Literature 2 

Teaching 



THIRD YEAR 

Shakspere 
Chemistry 1 

or Physics 5 
School Management 
Teaching 



Principles of Edt 
Physics 3, or 
Chemistry 1 
Economitis 2 
Teaching 



Stard subjects ar electiv. It is expected that in the first yr 
and in the summer term students from section M will arranged 
take the electivs previously omitted from program M. One ten 
of Geografy is required. 

Students from Section N ar required to take before graduatn 
enuf additional courses from program P to make a total of fiftn 
units of entrance credit, and twenty-six normal-school credits. 

Students from Section M and N who wish to take up any)f 
the special programs A-K should take from program P preparaty 
courses as arranged with the Dean. 



Illinois State Normal University 43 

CURRICULUM P 

The Preparatory Curriculum 

The preparatory curriculum is intended for students old enuf 
enter the normal school, who, because of their maturity and 
ligence, ar able to complete the equivalent of a high-school 
^'mrse in less than four school years. 

It is not intended for students who expect to engage in 
iaching after one or two years' attendance in the normal school. 
iich students should take curriculums M or N. 

It is recommended for mature students who wish to take 
16 special curriculums A to K but lack the high-school prepara- 
on required. 

Experienst teachers who wish to begin at once upon any of 
le curriculums A to K may arrange with the President or Dean 
) select part of their work from the preparatory program, part 
f it from the special curriculum. 

Preparatory credit is reckond in units, a unit being the 
quivalent of 36 weeks of high-school work with daily recitations 
equiring preparation. The numerals after the various term 
ourses indicate the fraction o* a unit coverd by the term's work. 

Students of the required age who hav completed the eighth 
rade and hav had no high-school work must complete fifteen 
mits of preparatory work. Students who hav completed a par- 
ial high-school course, may, in consultation with the President 
ir Dean, select from the preparatory program the units to be taken 
complete the fifteen. 

The stard courses ar electiv. Each student is required to 
ake one stard subject each term in addition to the required 
ubjects at the top of the list. 

One term of Orthografy and Phonics should be included in 
ivery student's curriculum. 

Public speaking is required daily for one term, weekly thru- 
)ut the entire course. The total credit allowd is one unit. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certificates without high- 
jchool work to their credit may shorten this program by passing 
m examination in such subjects as they ar prepared to pass. 

Holders of second-grade certificates who hav taught two 
Shears ar allowd one-half unit of preparatory credit for each sub- 
ject coverd by the certificate, but no such credit may be allowd 
in subjects where high-school credit is presented. 

Holders of first-grade teachers' certificates may make similar 
arrangements for the completion of the preparatory program. 



44 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



PROGRAM P 

The Preparatory Program 



Fall 

Algebra 4 

Algebra 7 .... 

Composition 

Reading 1 

Physical Training 1 

* Civics 1 

* Manual Training.. 
^Domestic Science.. 

*Latin 1 

*German 1 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 

%Algebra 5 

^Algebra 8 

% Public Speaking .. 

%Elem. Physics 

-GPhysical Training 1 

%*Economics 1 

%* Manual Training .. 
".S 'Domestic Science . 

Vs^Latin 2 

y3*German 2 



Spring 

%Algebra 6 

^Algebra 9 

%Orthografy 

% Physical Oeografy.. 
-6Physical Training 1, 

%* Reading 2 

%* Manual Training . 
%*Domestic Science 

%*Latin 3 

%*German 3 



SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 3 ^Geometry 4 ^Geometry 5 . .. 

Grammar 4 ^Rhetoric ^Literature 1 .. 

Zoology 3 ^Physiology 8 % Botany 5 

*Amer. Hist 2 %*Amer. Hist. 3 y2English Hist. . 

*Commer. Geog ...%*Zoology 4 i^*Music & Draw, 

•Sewing Va 'Sewing %*Sewing 

^Mechan. Draw . . . ys'Mechan. Draw ...%*Mechan. Draw 

*Latin 4 Vs 'Latin 5 Vs'Latin 6 

'German 4 Vs'German 5 Va 'German 6 



THIRD YEAR 

Physics 2 % Chemistry 1 ^2 Physics 3 

Literature 2 ^Reading 3 %Shakspere 3 

Ancient Hist.. . . . i/^Medieval Hist l^Modern History 

'Botany 6 ^4 'Astronomy % 'Algebra 1 

Art 4 %*Art 5 and 6 i/sArt 7 \.\\\ 

'Chemistry 1 1/2 'Chemistry 2 1/2 'Chemistry 3 . ! .* 

'Latin 7 ^^ 'Latin 8 1/2 'Latin 9 

•German 7 l^ 'German 8 ¥2 'German 9 

I^esign 14 * Arithmetic 2 y2 Blackboard Draw. 

Industrial Art y» Commercial Art. 



Illinois State Normal Oniversity 45 



THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

The act of the State Legislature creating Township Scholar- 

,ins in the state normal schools for the benefit of graduates of 

eighth grade obliges these institutions to provide academ o 

rses for such holders of these scholarships as do not intend to 

Ce eachers, and also for such as ar looking to teaching but 

titm too young to enter upon the regular normal-school pro- 

'""Tuition is free to all holders of township scholarships 

Other students of suitable age, character, and preparation may 
V admitted upon payment of tuition at the rate of eighteen dollars 
■r irrm or six doUars per study where partial work is taken. 

nSt^wfoielJitiof is to be paid from public funds should 
^ciire the necessary permits early in the fall term. 

The high-school students ar seated in a separate study hall 
oharge of a principal and three teachers, who devote their entire 
,4 to the instruction and care of these high-school students and 
' thp sunervision of their work. 

' on pages 49-51 five programs of study ar outlined; one with 
.tin and German for such students as expect to enter college, 

her designd especially for girls, giving a large Place to house- 

M economy, a commercial program, a manual training program, 

agricultur'al program. Physical training -^\^-"^^'J^ 

Aen at some time during the first three years. Monthly rheton- 

41 exercizes ar required of all students. 

Hi the intention to develop this department into a mode 
igh-sohool. While the value of liberal culture and the demands 
t 'citizenship will receiv due recognition in the ^^ /"S^.^'i' ° '^^ 
our=ies it is proposed to meet the growing demand that the high- 
h ;ours?shril prove directly servisable in P-Panng for high 
fflciency in useful occupations. Accordingly there ar arranged 
ve chief programs, each four years m length, differing in the 
rorainence given to particular groups of studies, and looking re- 
ipcTly toward the speaking and writing professions, medicm 
;nd agriculture, engineering and the bilding trades, commerce, and 

'^ GrTdttsTf the university High School ar admitted without 
xamination to all universities and colleges belonging to the North 
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Holders of township scholarships and others who contemplate 
mtering the University High School ar requested to register as 
iarly as is possible. Registration may be by mail. 

A special bulletin describing the University High School will 
ie furnisht upon applicatioK, 



*6 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

LATIN— GERMAN CURRICULUM 



' 



Latin 

Composition 1 
Algebra 
Physical Science 



Csesar 

Composition 2 
Greek History 
Zoology 



Cicero or German 
Literature 5 
Modern History 
Plane Geometry 



Vergil or German 
Literature 7 
Physics 

U. S. History or 
Mathematics 



FIRST YEAR 

Latin 

Literature 1 
Algebra 

Physical Science 
Music 

SECOND YEAR 

Caesar 

Literature 3 
Roman History 
Zoology or Physiol- 
ogy 
Drawmg 1 

THIRD YEAR 

Ovid or German 
Composition 3 
Modern History 
Plane Geometry 

FOURTH YEAR 

Horace or German 
Literature 8 
Physics 

U. S. History or 
Mathematics 



Latin 

Literature 2 
Algebra 
Botany 



Cicero 

literature 4 
Medieval History 
Botany or 
Physiology 



Vergil or German 

Literature 6 

Civics 

Solid Geometry 



German or Ind. Hist 
Literature 9 
Physics 
Economics or 
Mathematics 



COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 

Penmanship and Business Methods Business English 

Spellmg Literature 1 Literature 2 ., 

Composition 1 General Mathematics General Mathcmatici 

General Mathematics Physical Science Botany 

Physical Science Music 



Accounting 
Commercial Arith. 
Composition 2 
Botany 



SECOND YEAR 

Accounting 
Commercial Arith. 
Literature 3 
Physiology 



Accounting ^. 

Medieval History n 

Literature 4 
Physical Geografy 



THIRD YEAR 

Shorthand and Shorthand and Shorthand and 

Typewriting Typewriting Typewriting 

Literature 5 Composition 3 Literature 6 

United States HistoryUnited States HistoryCivics 
Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry 



Shorthand and 
Typewriting 
Literature 9 
Economics 
Physics 



FOURTH YEAR 

Shorthand and 
Typewriting 
Literature 10 
Physics 
Physical Geografy 



Shorthand and 

Typewriting, Offis 

Training 
Commercial Geograf 
Industrial History 
Physics 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 

MANUAL TRAINING CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 
Mechanical Drawing Bench Work 



47 



3nch Work 
imposition 1 
Igebra 
hysical Science 



Literature 1 
Algebra 
Physical Science 

SECOND YEAR 



echanical Drawing Bench Work 
omposition 2 Literature 3 

echanics Arithmetic Drawing 1 ^^ . . 
oology Zoology or Physiol- 

ogy 
Music 

THIRD YEAR 



athe Work 
iterature 5 
llane Geometry 
5 J. S. History 



Furniture 

Design 

Plane Geometry 

U. S. History 

Gymnastics 

FOURTH YEAR 



Literature 2 

Algebra 

Botany 

Lathe Work 
Literature 4 
Bookkeeping 
Botany or Physiology 



Furniture 
Literature 6 
Plane Geometry 
Givi^js 



.rt Metal or Cement Pottery fitSato^ ^ t 

Construction Literature 8 plvJiVs 

4S" ' FncTustrial History or CoSrcial Geografy 

Economics Physical Geografy 

HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 



Food and Cookery 
Composition 1 
h iPhysical Science 
areek History 



Study of the home 
Literature 1 
Physical Science 
Roman History 

SECOND YEAR 



Sewing 

Color 

general Mathematics 

Zoology 

Gymnastics 



Millinery and 

Dressmaking 
Costume Design 
Chemistry 
U. S. History 



Experimental Cook- 
ery 
Literature 7 
Physics 
Economics 



Mathematics 
Physiol- 



or 



Sewing 

Design 

General 

Zoology 

ogy 
Gymnastics 

THIRD YEAR 

Textils 

Composition 3 
Chemistry 
U. S. History 

FOURTH YEAR 

Institutional Cook- 
ery 



Household Manage- 
ment 
Literature 2 
Botany 
Physical Geografy 



Dressmaking 
Home Decoration 
General Mathematics 
Botany or Physiology 
Gymnastics 



Millinery and 

Dressmaking 
Literature 6 
Chemistry 
Civics 



Dietetics and Invalid 

Cookery 
Literature 9 
Physics 



Literature 8 

Industrial History or Commercial Geografy. 
Physical Geografy 



48 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

AGRICULURE SCIENCE CURRICULUM | 



Fall 
Domestic Animals 
Composition 1 
Manual Training 
Physical Science 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Animal Production 
Literature 1 
Farm Arithmetic 
Physical Science 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring 
Orchard and Garden 
Literature 2 
Mechanical Drawin] 
Botany 



Farm Crops Soil Physics 

Composition 2 Literature 3 

General Mathematics General Mathematics 
Zoology Zoology or Physiol- 

ogy 

THIRD YEAR 

Cement Construction Farm Bookkeeping Farm Machinery 
and Drainage Compositions'^ Literature 6 ^ 

Literature 5 Chemistry Chemistry 

Chemistry United States History Civics 

U. S. History 



Crop Production 
Literature 4 
General Mathematic? 
Botany or Physiolog 



Soil Fertility 
Literature 7 
Physics 
Economics 



FOURTH YEAR 

Farm Management Animal and Plant ti 
Literature 8 provement 

Physics Literature 9 

Industrial History or Physics 

Physical Geografy Commercial Geogral 

The Agricultural Science in the foregoing program is in stri 
accordance with the program for agricultural high schools reeoi 
mended by the Illinois Educational Commission. 

It is expected that the strictly agricultural work shall occIhw 
about one-fourth of the time of the student, and that it shall h 
taught from a vocational standpoint to prospectiv or probabh 
farmers. 

Practically the entire range of farm affairs is coverd by thi 
course, and it is believd that a good basis will be establisht fo 
intelligent reading by the young farmer. The Normal Universit 
farm is not used for experiment to discover new agricultura 
truth, but for demonstration of good farming methods, of the ef- 
fects of good fertilizers and rotations, of proper selection anc 
treatment of seed, of modes of cultivation, of the proper care ol 
live stock, and other details of farm practis. With the facilities 
and equipment at the command of the State Normal University, il 
is believd that the proper material, curriculum, and method ol 
an agricultural high school can be workt out. 

The other studies in the agricultural program ar chosen with 
regard to their value to the farmer-citizen. They comprise natu- 
ral science, government, and such studies in English as will lead tc 
fair skill in the use of the mother tung and to an appreciation ol 
the best literature. 



Illinois State Normal University 



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54 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 




STATEMENT OF COURSES 
IN DEPARTMENTS 



EDUCATION 

COURSE ONE 
The Teaching Process 

The major topics of this course ar (1) the larger social meanj 
ing of the public school, and the aims of teaching; (2) the choice o\ 
teaching as a vocation and qualifications for the work; (3) organi- 
zation of the school, and the daily program; (4) the course of studj 
and how the teacher can make the best use of it; (5) the lessoij 
and the lerning process, including the problem of pupils' study] 
(6) organization of lessons; (7) observation studies in the Training 
School; (8) the problems of school government and disciplia] 
(9) supervizion and the teacher. 

This course, or its equivalent, is required of all candidates foil 
the Normal-School diploma. It is offerd in fall, winter, spring, anq 
both summer terms. Major. 

Text: For the more mature classes Strayer's The Teachir 
Process; for beginners Colgrove's The Teacher and the School. 

COURSE TWO 
Elements of Psychology 

The aim of the course is to acquaint prospectiv teachers witH 
the principal types of mental behavior in relation to efficienf 
lerning and teaching. The principal topics ar instincts and inboril^ 
abilities, sensations, the formation of habits, feelings and emo' 
tions, and mental fatig. Five kinds of habits ar studied: mora; 
habits, habits of muscular skill, lerning verbatim, substance lern-' 
ing, and the solution of original problems. In addition to the| 
five recitations two laboratory periods per week ar required, whicl 
ar arranged by consultation with the instructor. Prerequisit: ai 
knowledge of the nervous system equal to what is included in] 
Biology 4 or Physiology 9. All terms. Major. 

Texts : Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology, and Kirkpatrick's 
Fundamentals of Child Study, 



Illinois State Normal University 55 

COURSE THREE 
General Method 

The aim of this course is to derive methods of instruction 
Irom an examination of educational aims, materials and psycho- 
logical principles. The order of development is as follows : Aim 
)f education; materials of education; mental processes involvd in 
ierning; interest, incentiv and motiv; forms of instruction— induc- 
bon and deduction; method in habit-formation; method in the 
formation of worthy ideals and prejudises; review of organization 
>f subject-matter, and effectiv devises. Prerequisit: Psychology 2. 
Texts : Charter's Methods of Teaching, McMurry's Method of 
Ithe Recitation. All Terms. Major. 

COURSE FOUR 
School Organization, Supervision and Management 
ra) The nature of institutional life in general, (b) The 
fundamental law of the school, (c) The logical evolution of the 
school thru its fundamental law. (d) The school at work under 
the law of its constitution, (e) The social and ethical training 
in the working of the school, (f) A detaild discussion of the 
problems of school supervizion. Text-books: Tompkins's Philos- 
\ophy of School Management, Dresslar's School Hygiene. All terms. 
[Major. 

COURSE FIVE 

Principles of Education 

A study of fundamental principles underlying educational 

activities. Leading topics: educational aims, the individual and 

society, the sources of human conduct, heredity and environment, 

modifiability of conduct thru educational agencies, educational 

values of the studies and of other school agencies. Prerequisit: 

I Education 1, 2, and 3. 

Texts: Ruediger's Principles of Education, Schroeder's Psy- 
chology of Conduct, supplemented by library readings. Winter, 
spring, and first summer terms. Major. 

COURSE SIX 
History of Eoua^TioN 
An elementary course covering the period from the Renais- 
sance to the present. The main European and American influences 
which hav formd our present theories of education and school 
systems, elementary and secondary, ar studied, and in this con- 
nection selections from the educational writings of Comenius, 
Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbert Spencer and Horace 
Mann ar red. Text: Monroe's Briefer Course. Spring term, first 
summer term. Major. 



56 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SEVEN 
High-School Problems 

This is a junior college course and may be taken in place of 
Education One by mature students who ar candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Education. Education One is recommended for 
recent high-school graduates without experience in teaching. The 
course deals with the educational problems of adolescence: (1) the 
transition from later childhood and elementary education to youth 
and secondary education; (2) physical, mental and social charac- 
teristics of adolescents; (3) need and instinctiv interests of this 
period; (4) the high-school course of study as determind by pres- 
ent needs and social outlook; (5) the problems of social life, ath- 
letics, organizations; (6) study and discussion of actual teaching 
problems in the University High School; (7) high-school admin- 
istration and management. Winter and spring terms. 

Prerequisits: graduation from a four-year accredited high 
school, or its equivalent, and Elementary Psychology. 

Texts: Johnston's The Modern High School; Irving King's The 
High School Age. Major. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

The History of Education 

Chief purposes and values. — These courses aim (1) to make 
an interpretation of history in terms of man's conscious, rational 
effort to improve the total conditions of life and realize the higher 
human ideals by means of education; (2) more specifically to trace 
the origin and development of educational ideals and processes in 
their relation to dominant life-problems; (3) to form more ac- 
curate standards of evaluation and practical judgment concerning 
present educational conditions; (4) to get inspiration and motiv 
from the lives of persons who hav made eminent contributions to 
the solution of the human problem in the field of education. 

COURSE EIGHT ll 

Ancient and Medieval Education 
Of ancient education main emfasis is put upon that of the 
Greeks and the Romans. The education that resulted from the 
ideals of the early Christians and the medieval churchmen is 
traced thru the monastic era and the age of scholasticism. The 
beginning of the secularization of education is studied in the train- 
ing of feudal chivalry and in the rise of the universities. Fall 
term. Major. 

Prerequisits: good courses in ancient and medieval history. 
Textbooks : the first and second volumes of Graves's History of 
Education. Monroe's Source Book, Painter's Great Pedagogical 
Essays, and other library references ar used for source reading. 



f 



Illinois State Normal University 57 

COURSE NINE 
Modern European Education 
The Renaissance, the Reformation and the beginnings of the 
lealistic movement ar studied to find their educational import in 
ihe transition to the modern era of science, democracy and the new 
humanism. The leading educational theorists and reformers ar 
tudied in relation to education in both Europe and America, 
^resent tendencies ar examind and interpreted as attempts to 
olv national problems and promote the attainment of the chang- 
ng ideals of human progress. Winter term. Major. 

Prerequisits : good courses in modern European history. 
Textbooks : the second volume of Graves's History of Educa- 
ion, and Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education. 

COURSE TEN 
Education in the United States 

A genetic study of American education is made under the 
'ollowing main divisions: (1) transplanted forms of European 
3ducation found in the Colonial period; (2) early American edu- 
jation as found in voluntary enterprizes and in the beginnings of 
'ree state systems before 1860; (3) the development of public 
education since 1860; (4) the present educational situation m its 
[-elation to the life of the people and national character. The history 
3f special lines of educational advance is noted in the study 
of special topics; e. g., "vocational education," "science in the 
curriculum," etc. Spring term. Major. 

Textbooks: Dexter's Education in the United States, and 
rhwing's Education in the United States Since the Civil War. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Educational Psychology 
This course is designd to giv practis in applying the principles 
of general psychology, acquired in Course 2, to the educational 
problems of the kindergarten and the primary grades. Practis is 
?iven in testing the sight and hearing of children in the training 
school. The mental characteristics of children of this period and 
their bearing on methods of instruction and training ar studied. 
Other topics: training of the imagination and feelings, mental 
fatigue, tests of nativ intelligence. Two hours of observation and 
laboratory work per week in addition to the five recitations, ar- 
ranged by the instructor. 

Prerequisit: Course 2. Fall term. Major. 
Texts: King's Psychology of Child Development, Bewey s The 
School and Society, 1915 edition, Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of 
Child Study, and Goddard's Revision of the Binet Measuring Scale 
of Intelligence. 



58 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE TWELV 

Educational Psychology. First Half. 
Courses 10 and 11 together ar intended for teachers of th 
high school and upper grammar grades, and principals and super 
intendents. In the fall term the topics ar : mental inheritance, in 
dividual difference, theories of interest, influence of age on lernim 
principal types of lerning, dril, the functions of feelings and emo 
tions in education, the transfer of training. Major. 

Prerequisit: Course 2. Fall term, and first summer term. 
Texts: Thorndike's Educational Psychology, Briefer Courst 
and Parker's Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Educational Psychology. Second Half. 
This course deals with tests of nativ intelligence, and educa 
tional scales. Ample practis in the training school in the use o 
the tests. Two hours of laboratory work and testing in the train 
ing school per week, in addition to the five recitations, to be ar 
ranged by the instructor. Major. i 

Prerequisit: Course 2 and Course 12 if possible. 
Texts: Thorndike's Educational Psychology, Briefer Course 
Goddard's Revision of the Binet Measuring Scale of Intelligence 
and Yerkes-Bridges-Hardwick Point of Mental Ability. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 
The Evolution of Morality and Ethical Theories , 

The factors, processes, and main lines of moral development 
Ethical theories considerd and evaluated as factors in moderi 
history. Typical fases of present moral situations analyzed ani 
hypothetical solutions thought out. The school, as one of the coi 
operativ agencies in the creation and maintenance of ethical ideal 
and moral standards. Concrete problems for study. Spring term 
1918. Major. 

Prerequisit: good courses in the social sciences — history 
sociology, economics, and politics. Oflferd in the spring term a 
even-numbered years to alternate with Course Fifteen. 

Textbook: Dewey and Tufts' Ethics. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
Social Ethics 

This course is an interpretation, or evaluation, of character- 
istic movements and events in American history in their bearinj 
upon the liberation and direction of the energies of the people am 
the emancipation of the human spirit in accordance with the lawi 
of economy, justis, and social redemption. It examins the ethics 
of leading vocations, such as business, the law, engineering, bilding 
speculativ enterprizes, parenthood. It includes also a consideratioi 
of the ethical significance of household and municipal sanitation 
personal helth, and social hygiene. Spring term, 1919. Major. 

Prerequisit: see Course Fourteen. 

Text: The Socialized Conscience, Cofiin. 



'M. 



Illinois State Normal University 59 

COURSE SIXTEEN 
School Administration 
Fall Term: The function of the national government, the 



ite and local units of administration, the financing of the school, 
13 school plant, the superintendent and the teaching staff, the 
3blems of supervizion, the evolution of the course of study, the 
ministration of supplementary and special education. Major. 

Winter Term: The application of scientific methods in de- 
mining the efficiency of a school system, the interpretation of 
^o«ilaool statistics, school records, scheol reports, school surveys. 

Spring' Term: Problems of high-school administration. Gur- 
5ulum, equipment, class organization, technique of method and 
management, social activities, six-year and four-year programs, 

^(l'4e relation of the elementary school and to the college, brief com- 
,rativ study of for en secondary schools. Major. 
-■- Texts: Button and Snedden's Administration of Public Edu- 

^6 3 \iion in the United States, Stray er and Thorndike's Educational 
iministration, McMurry's Elementary School Standards, Brown's 
he American High School Johnston's The Modern High School, 

^o"' ipplemented by extensiv library reading. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

For the professional instruction of teachers in servis the 
tate Normal University establisht in 1916-17 study centers at 
m lurora, Chicago Heights, Clinton, Colfax, Danvers, Danville, De- 
mode litur, Fairbury, Granite City, Hillsboro, Jacksonville, Joliet, Kan- 
yz''(la|akee, Litchfield, Mason City, Minonk, Nokomis, Pekin, Peoria, 

aylorville. 
.-..-.-f The subjects studied wer Sociology, Educational Psychology, 
M\Ai mglish Literature, Arithmetic, Art, Geografy, and European His- 
5ry. Twenty-nine classes wer conducted, with a total enrolment 
-histfl! f 677. The extension course coverd thirty weeks (September 
8— April 28). Each class was visited fifteen times by the in- 
tructor for a two-hour session. Teachers ar required to devote 
our hours per week to home study and to purchase the regular 
extbook used in the course. Other books for reading and refer- 
nee hav been supplied by the local libraries and by the state cir- 
ulating library. A major credit is given for the year's work. 
m\i iimilar centers will be establisht in 1917-18, provided at least 
betri welv teachers unite in requesting the same course. Correspond- 
opiei toce should be begun early in order that classes may be organized 
(hell -s early as September 10, 1917. 
leetb 

m 

nitalii 



60 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



MATHEMATICS 




ARITHMETIC 

COURSE ONE 
Method in Arithmetic for the First Six School Years 

The Purpose. — To arrive at the logical order of number knowl- 
edge, to derive its processes from simple counting, and to develoj 
and illustrate the principles and methods of instruction in th( 
primary and intermediate grades, with observation and analysis 
of work in the Training School. The Illinois State Course of Studj 
forms the basis of the work. Text: Cook and Cropsey. 

This course is required of all students in Sections B, C, L. 
M, N. Students with partial high-school courses or with some 
experience in teaching grammar grades should take as prerequisit 
Course 2. Students without high-school training or its equivalent 
should take as preparatories Courses 3 and 4, insted of 2. Ali 
terms. Major. 

COURSE TWO 
Mensuration and Percentage 

This course is a combination of Courses 3 and 4, six weeks 
each, and is intended for more mature and advanst students. It 
consists of a rapid review of the essentials of those courses as well 
as the emfasizing of the important points as to methods and re- 
sults. The principal topics of the seventh and eighth years' work 
of the State Course of Study ar included. All terms. Major. 

Texts: For Mensuration, Felmley's Eighth Year Arithme- 
tic. For Percentage, Thurston's Business Arithmetic. 

COURSE THREE 

MENSUR-\TI0N 

The purpose of this course is to arrive experimentally at 
modes of mesuring areas and volumes, to obtain the laws of 
similar figures, to inform the student as to conditions that obtain 
in carpeting, papering, plastering, the mesure of land, lumber, 
brick and concrete work, as well as bights and distances, and the 
application of the Pythagorean proposition. Minor credit in cur- 
riculums A — L. 



Illinois State Normal University 61 

In volumes the study pertains to the rectangular solids, the 
■linder pyramid, cone, and sfere— with many practical prob- 
es in each draWn from various industries In the country 
hool courses an effort is made to draw the problems largely from 
ie farm and country. All the topics in the eighth-year work of 
,e State Course of Study ar included. All terms. Minor. 
Text: Felmley's Eighth Year Arithmetic. 

COURSE FOUR 
Percentage and Business Arithmetic 
As a foundation for the course the relations of percentage 
fractions and decimals ar discust and a thoro study is made 
the three type-forms of problems. The mam part ot the work 
a consideration of the applications o percentage m profit and 
OSS. commission, commercial discount interest, banking ex- 
hange, stocks and bonds, taxation, and insurance, with special 
mfasis upon the usages of the commercial world. All terms. 
Text: Thurston's Business Arithmetic. Minor credit. 

COURSE FIVE 
Arithmetic Review 
This course is designd as a review of the fundamental opera- 
ions factoring, common and decimal fractions, and denominate 
umbers. It is necessary groundwork for all the other courses m 
irithmetic. Students who do not hav an accurate and redy 
knowledge of the above-named topics take this course as a pre- 
•equisit to all other mathematical courses. Fall and winter terms. 
Text; Smith's Complete Arithmetic. 

BOOKKEEPING 

COURSE ONE (Six Weeks) 

This course has for its aim to prepare teachers for the work 
in bookkeeping outlined in the State Course of Stu<ly. 

From a study and comparison of a number ot individual ao- 
eounts-cash, merchandise, and Pe^'sonal-the principles of debit 
and credit ar derived. These principles ar then apP >ed to the 
handling of six or more sets of accounts, beginning ^;^'«i the sim- 
plest and including some which require some knowledge of notes 
and drafts and their use in a system of "'°^Z^^''^''^^f-J^f°^- 
nection with the study of a set of accounts the purpose and form 
of the day-book and journal, and their combination m t^e explana- 
tory journal, ar lernd. Most of this work is done >" be c a^. 
Outside of the class pupils use The Sadler-Rowe I^^dget System 
which teaches how to prepare many kinds o^ business papers as 
well as how to keep the journal and ledger. Work in the budget 
,s completed to page 53. In the fall and spring terms a longer 
".curse is taught. Fall, winter, spring, first summer terms. Minor. 



[p 



IS 



62 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ALGEBRA 

The function, scope, and logical order of Algebra, its relati( 
to arithmetic, its notation and fundamental ideas. Principles ; 
derived inductivly from concrete problems, and afterwards by rij 
orous deduction from definition. An attempt is made to teach pupi 
to think clearly and to appreciate the validity of conclusions dra^ 
from given data. Especial attention is paid to the language • 
algebra, to describing and relating algebraic processes, and to tl 
mode of developing the more difficult topics. Some attention 
paid to the principles of the equivalency of equations and sy. 
tems of equations, and the methods of solution ar based on tl 
proofs of these principles. The graf is used to illustrate the mear 
ing of the equations. The work includes quadratics, series, an 
logarithms, and is offerd in three forms. An additional electi 
course is offerd in College Algebra. 

COURSE ONE i 

Taylor's Elements of Algebra 

This course covers all important and difficult questions in th 
subject. 

Prerequisit: a strong high-school course in Algebra equal I 
the requirement of the best colleges. Spring term. Major. 

COURSE TWO 

Taylor's Elements of Algebra, Chapters I-XV. 

Positiv and negativ numbers, the fundamental operations v 
integral literal expressions, factoring, highest common factor aiv 
lowest common multiple, fractions and fractional equations, sys 
tems of linear equations. Fall, spring, and first summer ter 
Minor credit in curriculums A — K. 

COURSE THREE 
Chapters XVI-XXXIII 

Evolution, surds, imaginary and complex number, quadratic 
irrational equations, higher equations, inequalities, proportion 
theory of exponents, series, binominal theorem and logarithmJ 
Fall, winter and both summer terms. Minor credit A — K. 

Courses 2 and 3 ar for students who hav had only a partiaj 
course in algebra. Together they count as the equal of Course 1| 

COURSE FOUR 

Taylor's Elements of Algebra. Chapters I-X 
Positiv and negativ numbers. The fundamental operations ii| 
integral literal expressions, linear equations in one unknown, U 
toring. Fall and spring terms. Semi-major credit. 

T 



fA 



Illinois State Normal University 63 

COURSE FIVE 

''^%,, Chapters XI-XX 

iiicip]i >'• ■ 

i Highest common factor and lowest common multiple, frac- 
ins and fractional equations, systems of linear equations, evolu- 
-n, irrational numbers and surds, imaginary and complex num- 
rs, quadratics in one unknown. Winter term. 



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and 
edoi 



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)Q!IC 



COURSE SIX 

Chapters XXI-XXXIII 

-«» Irrational equations, higher equations, inequalities, theory of 
ttienii ponents, indeterminate equations, series, binominal theorem and 
^"es, garithms. Spring term. 

! Courses 4, 5 and 6 ar for mature students who hav not 
udied algebra. They count as the equivalent of Course 1. 

COURSES SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE 
These ar preparatory courses running thru the year and in- 
nded for young students who hav not studied algebra. They 
unt as the equivalent of Courses 4 and 5. Text : Hawkes, Luby, 
id Touton. 



GEOMETRY 

These courses cover the ordinary high-school work in plane, 
)lid, and sferical geometry. An attempt is made to teach the sub- 
jcts so that the student will realize the value and meaning of its 
Hnciples. The logic of geometry is approacht by gradual steps 
^^rn^d the first few propositions ar developt syllogistically. In this 
ay the habit and form of reasoning ar establisht. The student 

expected to work his way relying on his own power of reason- 
,ig, and not on mere memory work. More than one-third of the 
[me is devoted to original demonstrations. Free use is made of 
[upplemental problems and propositions. Considerable attention 

given to theorems and notions of fundamental importance in the 

ucture of the subject as well as to those of practical utility. 

istorical notes ar not omitted and modern developments of the 

bject receiv some attention. Three main ends ar kept in view: 
!o acquire the essential facts of the subject as properties of space 

which we live, to equip the student with the forms of deductiv 
easoning, and to make the study a drill in precise thinking and 
ccurate, perspicuous expression. 

Course 1 is for students that hav had previously strong courses 
n geometry. Students due in one term only should take Course 

unless they hav previously completed a thoro course in solid 
eometry. Courses 3, 4 and 5 ar for students who hav not had 
eometry. All of plane geometry is required of all students. Text: 

entworth-Smith. 



64 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE ONE 

Fundamental conceptions and definitions, theorems in par- 
allels, equality of triangles, parallelograms, the circle, propor- 
tion, similar figures, area of polygons, regular polygons. This 
is a review of plane geometry. Fall and winter terms. Major. 

COURSE TWO 

Lines and planes in space, diedral and polyedral angles and 
polyedrons. The cylinder, cone and sfere. All of solid geometry. 
Spring and first summer terms. Major. 

COURSE THREE 

Fundamental conceptions and definitions, theorems in paral- 
lels, equality of triangles, parallelograms, the circle, proportion, 
and a part of the work on similar figures. This course covers 
two and one-half books of plane geometry. Fall term, and first 
summer term. Minor credit in programs A — ^K. 

COURSE FOUR 

This course completes plane geometry. Winter term and 
second summer term. Minor credit. 

COURSE FIVE 

This course covers the whole of solid and sferical geometry. 
It is the same as course 2 above. Spring and first summer terms. 
Major. 

COURSE SIX 

Algebra and Geometry Method 

This course is designd for prospectiv teachers of high- 
school mathematics. It includes a study of the aims in teaching 
algebra and geometry, their place in the high-school curriculum, 
the subject-matter to be offerd, the methods of presentation and 
the history of important topics. The text-book work is supple- 
mented by the reading and discussion of reports, addresses, maga- 
zine articles and other books dealing with the present tendencies 
in the teaching of mathematics. Spring term and first summer 
term. 

Texts: Smith's Teaching of Geometry and Young's Teaching 
of Mathematics, 

ELEMENTARY ASTRONOMY 

This course is intended to give students such an insight into 
the organization of the solar system and the problems of astron- 
omy as will enable them to read an almanac and teach mathe- 
matical geografy intelligently. As far as possible, numerical facts 
ar derived mathematically from the original data. A good deal 
of observation work is required. Wider reading on assignd topics 
is also a feature of the work. Winter term. Major. 

Text : Howe's Elements. 



I 

IB Illinois State Normal University 65 

11 TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

P COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

This course covers the following topics: Undetermind co- 
ifficients, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentia and loga- 
ithmic series, permutations and combinations. P>-obab.hties co„ 
nued fractions, the summation of series, the general theory o 
quations, the solution of higher equations and the elements o 
«terminants. Prerequisit: Course 1, 3 or 6. Fall term. Text. 
iietz and Crathorne. Major. 

TRIGONOMETRY 

This course includes the theory of trigonometry both in the 
,lane and on the stere, as well as the ordinary f Pl;«a^"fJ° 
urveying and astronomy. Prerequisit: Plane and solid geom- 
"ry algebra. Winter term only. Text: Taylor, with tables m 
eparate volume. Major. 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 

This course covers the ordinary analytical methods of inves- 
i-ation the general properties of conies, and a brief course in 
he anaiytical^leometry of three dimensions. Prerequisit: Tr g- 
rnometry and algebra. Spring term only. Text: Ashton. Major. 

PHYSICS 

COURSE ONE 
Elements op Physical Science 
The purpose of this course is three-fold. 1. To lead the stu- 
dent into the habit of observing and studying carefuUy the 
elements of physical science as applied to every-day life. 2. io 
Sp hm for'^fficient work in the t«a°hing of nature study in 
the physical world in the graded and ungraded schools. 3 To 
"h him with clearer conceptions of those physical Prmc.ples 
which underlie the study of geografy, physiology, botany, and 

'""'aO students who hav not taken a course in physics ar required 
to take tht course as a prerequisit to all work in geografy or 

'"'Th^'cotse^'iovers in a simple way but with much expen- 
mental work the following topics: Elementary meteorology wi h 
S non- nstrumental observation thruout the term and instru- 
mental observation for one month, the physical principles mvolvd 
Tsuch wether study, study of lighting sy^t^™^^^^^^^^,^^^^^^.^^^ 
oresenf study of heating systems of the past and present, study 
SiUv water supply and present systems ^o^ home supply; 
soil physics; ventilation; sanitation of home and school sur- 
roundings. 



66 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The experimental work deals with evaporation, condensate 
air weight, air pressure, air currents, temperature mesuremer 
combustion and oxidation, diffusion of heat, composition (so 
and volatil matter) of common fuels, distillation of crude peti 
!eum, etc. About one-half of the experimental work is done 
the class and the rest as demonstrations. Very complete and sj 
tematic notes ar required and both subject matter and form a 
composition ar daily criticized by the teacher. i 

In general, the work of this course is largely determind I 
the phenomena which daily confront the student. Winter term. 

Text-book: General Science, Barber and others. ' 

COURSES TWO AND THREE 

Physics for grade teachers. (7 hours per week). Course 
given in the fall term and both summer terms; Course 3 given 
the spring term and both summer terms. 

This is a two-term course in physics for elementary teache 
The application of physical principles to daily life in the hor 
and school ar given special attention. The laboratory work 
not given as an end in itself but as a means of securing clear co 
ceptions of the principles and phenomena under consideration. 

Course two covers the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gas' 
and heat. Considerable attention is given to the following topic 
water supply, sewage disposal, the heating, ventilation, and humi: 
ifying of residences and school-rooms. 

Course 3 covers magnetism, static and current electricil 
light, and sound. Special attention is given to modern metho 
of lighting residences and school-rooms. 

Prerequisits: Algebra, geometry, and course 1 or its equiv 
lent. Minor credit in programs A — K. 

Toxts: Physics of the Household, Lynde, and Laborato 
Exercizes, Fuller and Bro\^Tilee. 

COURSES FOUR AND FIVE 

Course 4 given in fall and first summer terms; Course 
in winter and both summer terms. 

This is a two-term course in physics for high-school teacl 
ers. It is intended for mature students in the normal school ai 
for students in the junior college who ar preparing to teach in tl 
high school. The more difficult problems of high-school physi 
ar given special attention. The students will be expected to u 
logarithms in the solution of problems. The technique of higl 
school laboratory management receivs due attention. 

Course 4 covers mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, m( 
lecular physics and heat. 

Course 5 covers magnetism, static and current electricit 
sound, light, and radio-activity. 

Prerequisits: A working knowledge of algebra includii 
logarithms, geometry, and some previous work in physics. Major 

Texts: Practical Physics, Black and Davis, and Laboratoi 
Exercizes. Fuller and Brownlee. 



Illinois State Normal University 67 

sal"" COURSE SIX 

^ Method in Physical Science for the Elementary Schools 
m This course in physical science is for graduates of four-year 
P^igh schools. The purpose of the course is to bild up a course in 
Mature study in the physical world. It contemplates the following 

(a) The discovery of the pedagogical basis for the study of 
)hysical science in the school. 

(b) The consideration of a course of study involving the 
)hysical sciences in their relation to daily life. 

(c) Occasional observation of work in the Training School. 
Prerequisit: high-school physics. Winter and spring terms. 

, -ajor. 
^^! Text-book : General Science, Barber. 

11 TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

'*1 SENIOR COLLEGE 

boil , ,, ,. 

irkii In the following courses emfasis is placed upon the appli- 
rcoibation of the principles in life as well as upon an academic treat- 
ion ment of the principles themselvs. It is intended that these 
^courses shall produce resourceful high-school teachers, therefore 
opiciievery effort is made to keep fairly close to high-school methods 
umiiland high-school materials. 

COURSE SEVEN 
ricill 
,y Applied Mechanics 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
'-'' counting as 5 hours). Spring term. 

This is a Junior College course. It covers applied mechanics, 
'"", a brief study of the trigonometric functions and a use of trigono- 
iinietric tables. 

m Prerequisits: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 
m Texts: Elementary Practical Mechanics, Jameson, and Exer- 
^cizes in Mechanics, Jameson. Essentials of Physics, Hering, will be 
used as a reference in all college courses in physics. Major. 

COURSE EIGHT 

inllJ Magnetism and Electricity 

^^^'^1 (3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, 
^"^f counting as 5 hours). Fall term. Major. 

'"^! Prerequisit: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 

I Texts: Elements of Electricity for Technical Students, 
'ITimbie; and Laboratory Manual. Direct and Alternating Currents, 

.JClewell. 

ricitl 



idii 

m 



M 



68 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE NINE 

Light and Sound 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory wor 
counting as 5 hours.) Winter term. Major. 

Prerequisit: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent. 

Texts: Handbook of Acoustics, Harris, and Essentials 
Physics, Hering. 

COURSE TEN 

Heat 

(3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory wor 
counting as 5 hours.) Spring term. Major. 
Prerequisits : Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent and trigonometr 
Texts: Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat, Millika; 
and Heat, Randall. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Laboratory Assistant 

Method in Physics and Chemistry for the high-school. (10 houi 
per week, counting as 5 hours.) Any term. Major. 
This course deals with both the theoretical and the practice 
questions arising in the management of an elementary course i 
physics or chemistry. The course contemplates the followin 
ends, on the side of — 

Theory: 1. Purpose of a high-school course in Physics c 
Chemistry. 

2. Method of presentation of subject matter. 

3. The problem of securing profitable notebook worl 

4. The most profitable work in the poorly-equip 

laboratory. 
Practis: 1. Designing, making, and testing simple appar 
atus for the laboratory. 
2. Laboratory assistant in Course 2 or 3, or Cours 

1 or 2 in Chemistry. 
Helping to care for notebooks. 
Prerequisits: Courses 4 and 5 and Courses 1, 2 and 7 ii 
Chemistry. This course may count as one term of teaching. 

Text-book : The Teaching of Physics and Chemistry in Sec- 
ondary Schools, Smith and Hall. 






qwj 



Illinois State Normal University 69 

|, CHEMISTRY 

SELECTION OF COURSES 
Candidates for the Normal-School diploma who ar conditiond 
n Chemistry should take Course 1 during the winter sprmg, 
i)r first or second summer term. Candidates for the diploma m 
'lousehold Science should take Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8. Candidates 
'or the diploma in Agriculture should take Courses 1, 2, 3, 5 b, 7. 
Students preparing to teach chemistry in the high schools should 
,ake Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. All ar major. 
COURSES ONE, TWO, AND THREE 
General Chemistry. (3 hours per week recitations, 4 hours 
mi ber week laboratory.) These courses include a year g work m 

■ iinorganic chemistry of college grade and extend thru the rail, 

winter, and spring terms. Course 1 is repeated each term, in- 
cluding the mid-spring and the two summer terms. Course ^ ib 
also offerd in the first summer term, Course 3^^^ ^^^%s®^°^^ 
iummer term. Course 1 is required of all candidates for the 
,0h. iNormal-School diploma who hav not had a course m high-school 
■o chemistry or its equivalent, extending thru at least a half year 
Z iThe three courses ar required of all candidates for the Domestic 
Z Science and Agriculture diplomas, irrespectiv of whether a high- 
hli™ ischool course in chemistry has been taken or not. 

Course 1 is the study of the elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitro- 
gen and carbon and their compounds, of air, of the properties 
of gases, of solution, of fuels, of the fundamental laws and theories 
of chemistry, and of chemical calculations. Extensiv application 
of chemistry to daily life is made. 

Courses 2 and 3 continue the study of the non-metals and 
^metals. Sulfur, the halogens, silicon, boron, fosforus, sodium, 
m ipotassium, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, copper, mer- 
^cury, silver, gold, led, tin, manganese, chromium, vanadium, 
tungsten, zinc, and platinum and their various compounds ar 
studied. The problem of soil fertility is studied. The salt 
products industry, the silicate industry, the cement industry ana 
the iron and steel industry ar studied. Numerous applications 
of chemistry to the problems of the household ar considerd. 

Text: A Course in General Chemistry, McPherson and Hen- 
derson. 



lysies 
if 



•Con 



70 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSES FOUR AND EIGHT 

Organic Chemistry. (3 hours per week recitations, 4 ho 
per week laboratory.) Fall and winter terms. 

This is a study of the carbon compounds with reference 
hydrocarbons, alcohols, organic acids, ethers, esters, aldehyd.,, 
ketones, amins, amids, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and aromati 
compounds. Animal and vegetable textil fibers, fuels, food adul 
terants, and substitutes ar studied. Elementary studies in physi 
ological chemistry ar undertaken. 



Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, and 3 or their equivalent. 
Texts: Organic Chemistry, Norris. Experimental Organi 
Chemistry, Norris. 

COURSE FIVE ;j| 

Qualitativ Analysis. (6 hours per week laboratory, 2 hour 
per week recitation.) Fall term. 

This course is intended for students who expect to teac: 
chemistry in high schools. It is based on the ionic theory and th 
mass law and presupposes a knowledge of general chemistry. Th 
course includes the separation and identification of the commol 
metals and acids. Analysis of compounds and mixtures is under 
taken, a number of unknown substances being examind. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, and 3 or their equivalent. 

Text: Qualitative Analysis, Bailey and Cady. Other work 
on qualitativ analysis ar consulted frequently. 

COURSES SIX AND SEVEN 

Qualitativ Analysis. (6 hours per week laboratory, 2 hourP 
per week recitation.) Winter and spring terms. 

After the student has become familiar with the standard 
methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis he applies thes 
methods to the analysis of commercial substances. Agricultura 
products, including milk, butter, cheese, fertilizers, feeding stuff?] 
soils, and crop residues ar examind. The analysis and calorimetrjl 
of solid and gaseous fuels is undertaken. The sanitary analysij] 
of air and water is done. Students taking advanst work ii| 
Domestic Science may undertake the examination of the commoij 
foods and reagents of the household. 

A course in method of teaching high-school chemistry simi- 
lar to that given in connection with Courses 4 and 8 above is givei 
in connection with Courses 5, 6 and 7. 

Prerequisit: Courses 1, 2, 3 and 5. 

Text: Elementary Quantitativ Chemical Analysis, Lincoli 
and Walton. 

The opportunity of practis teaching in chemistry in the Uni- 
versity High School is offerd to students who hav the necessaryj 
preparation in the science. These high-school classes extend thru- 
out the year. 



'ence 
kh, 

m 
hi 



Illinois State Normal University 71 



BIOLOGY 



U\ 



Om 



NATURE STUDY 
COURSE ONE 
Agricultural Nature Study— Fall Aspect 
This course is designd especially for students who ar regis- 
■rd in the programs for country teachers. The work consists 
observations and experiments in the laboratory, garden, green- 
9use, and campus. Chief topics: Insects, birds, trees, shrubs, 
ill wild flowers, garden plants, including a detaild study of the 
arts of a flower, pollination and seed forming, characteristics, 
> k teibits of growth, and economic value of some common vegetables, 
'- ^pagation by budding, cuttings, and bulbs, a detaild study of 
) te beat and corn, weeds, fungi and fungous diseases. 

The course is based largely upon the State Course m Nature- 

«udy Agriculture. It considers material available in country 

.id village districts, methods of manipulation and presentation, 

unMicluding simple experiments, observation field trips, and coUec- 

iions. Notes and drawings ar kept. 

Texts: Beginnings of Agriculture, Mann. Lesson Plans m 
^ature-Study Agriculture. Fall and summer terms. Minor credit 
A— K. 

COURSE TWO 
Agricultural Nature Study— Spring Aspect 
The general plan of this course is the same as in Course 1. 
««_ipecial topics: Grafting, soil with simple experiments in drainage, 
Jill japillarity, germination tests, planning and planting a small 
ultii vegetable and flower garden, poultry. Minor credit A— K. 
still Prerequisit: Course 1. 

•im] Text: Same as in Course 1. Spring term. 

COURSES THREE (AND THREE A^ 
Invertebrate Zoology 
This is a general introductory course in elementary zoology 
'«'" designd to meet, in part, the needs of those who ar preparing to 
'«•' teach zoology in the high school or nature study in the elementary 
school. Animals from each of the groups of invertebrates which 
ar represented in our local fauna ar studied with special reference 
to their economic relations. The work consists of field and 
laboratory studies of living animals; microscopic study of protozoa; 
• -■lectures; text and library assignments. Stress is laid on the 
'^ evidences of evolution and the adaptations of animals to their 
It^'^fmodes of life. Notes and drawings ar kept. Fall and both summer 
terms. Course 3A is for advanst students. Major. 

Text: Linville and Kelley's Text-book in General Zoology. 



ork 



Liofli 



1 



72 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FOUR 
Vertebrate Zoology 

This is a general elementary course in vertebrate zoology dc 
signd particularly for those who ar preparing to teach zoolo^ 
in the high school. It deals with the classification, anatomy, phys. 
ology, evolution, and economic relations of vertebrate animal 
The work consists of experiments on living animals; dissection 
study of museum specimens; field study of birds and other an 
mals, lectures, text and library assignments. Special emfasis 
laid on the habits and economic relations of birds and on evolutic 
of the animal kingdom. Notes and drawings ar kept. Winter ar 
first summer terms. Major. 

Text: Same as in Course 3. 

COURSE FIVE >:: 

Phanerogamic Botany 

This is a general elementary course in botany dealing with th~ 
so-cald flowering plants and seed plants. It is designd to meet, 
part, the needs of those who are preparing to teach botany in th 
high school or nature study in the elementary school. It dea! 
with the elements of morfology, physiology, classification, an 
ecology of seed plants. The work consists of laboratory experi 
ments and observations with notes and drawings, field trips, tei 
and library assignments. Chief topics : The relations of the pla 
to soil, air, and light; the relations of the flowers to insects; t 
processes of fotosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, food storage 
and digestion. Spring and both summer terms. Major. 

Texts : A Text-Book in Botany, Coulter, and Gray's New Manuc 
of Botany. 

COURSE SIX 

Cryptogamig Botany 

This is a general elementary course in botany dealing with thij 
so-cald non-flowering, or seedless, plants. A study is made of rep' 
resentativ lower forms establishing an evolutionary sequence froil 
the algae to the seed plants and the evolution of the plant king- 
dom IS discust. Special emfasis is placed on the economic forms 
viz., the yeasts, molds, bacteria, and parasitic fungi. Numerod 
experiments are made with cultures of bacteria and simple bae- 
teriological methods ar demonstrated. This course is designd foi 
those preparing to teach botany in the high school. Fall and firs- 
summer term. Major. i 

Texts: A Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, and Bacteria, Yeastsi 
and Mold m the Home, Conn. 



zooi 



Illinois State Normal University 73 

COURSE SEVEN 
Nature-Study— Material and Method 
This course is designd for students who ar preparing to teach 
•J Iture study in the grades. It includes a study of material 
1 liited to the various grades, the educational bearings of the sub- 
!! k with extensiv readings, and lesson plans for the different 
•ades. Fall, spring, and summer terms. Major. 

Text : Practical Nature -Study, Coulter and Patterson. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Physiology and Hygiene 
An elementary course for students who hav not studied zoology 
' physics, but of sufficient extent to qualify for the examination 
i)r second-grade elementary certificates. Especial attention is 
aid to questions of personal hygiene. Major. 

Text: Advanst Physiology and Hygiene, Conn and Budding- 

COURSE NINE 

The Human Body 

The anatomy, physiology, and hygiene of the human body 
r considerd from the biological standpoint. The organs and 
M heir functions ar considerd together. Free use is made of 
iianikin, skeleton, and many models. One general dissection and 
demonstration of the sheep's hart and lungs ar made before 
he class. Brief microscopic study of the principal tissues is made. 
The last two weeks of the term ar given to hygiene and sani- 
iation. 

Prerequisits: Elementary physics and zoology. Fall, winter, 
iind spring terms for women only. A winter term class for men 
mly. Summer term classes include both sexes. Major. 
Text: Hough and Sedgwick's Human Mechanism, 



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3lon 



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COURSE TEN 

Taxonomig Biology 

This course includes a study of the trees and shrubs of the 
campus and nearby plants of nativ forest; of the birds that may 
be seen here during the term; of the decorativ plants grown in 
^Wthe school garden, greenhouse, and local nurseries; and of the 
^■wild flowering plants of the local flora, all largely from the tax- 
onomic point of view. The relativ value, uses, and characteris- 
tics of the different trees, shrubs and flowers and the economic 
^^* relations of birds receiv due attention. There ar over one hun- 



74 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

dred species of trees and shrubs on the campus and over one hui 
dred species of birds ar quite common in the vicinity during 11 
spring term, and almost every variety of decorativ plant grown 
this climate may be found in the school garden, on the campus ( 
in the local nurseries. Familiarity with all these and with tj 
local wild flora constitutes a fund of information which shou 
prove very valuable to the teacher of high-school biology or ( 
nature study. 

Birds and plants will be studied on alternate days, so th. 
students who can not take the whole course may take either pa 
of the course as a minor, counting for one-half credit. Spri^ 
term. Major. 

Texts: Gray's New Manual of Botany and Reed's Land at 
Song Birds, 

COURSE ELEVEN 
Biology Method 

This course consists of lectures and assignd readings on tl 
method of instruction in biology. It includes the consideration ( 
the educational values of biology, the outlining of courses of stud 
in botany, in zoology, and in physiology; the details of laboratoi 
management, the construction of simple apparatus, and the coUec 
tion and preservation of materials. Five hours per week. Wintt 
term. Major. 

Text: Students are askt to buy and read Ganong's Teachii 
Botanist, altho it will not be used as a text. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE TWELV 
General Zoology 

Three double laboratory periods, one lecture, and one quiz pei 
week. This course extends thruout the year, beginning with thl 
fall term, 1917. 

This is a general college course in zoology, dealing with an 
mals exclusiv of insects. It consists of a more or less inteixii' 
study of certain type forms representing the different groups o- 
animals. The morfology, histology, physiology, ecology, xim 
bryology, behavior, and economic relations of animals all recer] 
consideration. Students ar permitted to make for themsel 
permanent microscope slides and to prepare other illustrativ m 
terial which will be of use in high-school teaching. Majors. 

Prerequisit: Zoology 3 and 4. , 

Text : Hegner's College Zoology, { 



with 



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quiz, 
dill 

ith 
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,tivii 

8. 



Illinois State Normal University 75 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
General Entomology 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation 
►er week. Field trips on Saturdays. Fall term, 1918. 

This is a general introductory course in entomology, dealmg 
nth the morfology, physiology, ecology, and classification of m- 
Itects The laboratory work consists of dissections of some of the 
Lrger insects, of experiments on some of the fases of msect be^ 
lavior- or life-history studies and of the making of permanent 
'nicroscope slides of insect organs and tissues. Students ar ex- 
Ijected to make collections of insects and to lern how to use keys 
iji classifying them. Major. 

Text: Folsom's Entomology. 

Prerequisit: Course 3 or equivalent. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 
Animal Evolution 

Five hours per week. Winter term, 1918-19. 
- In this course the various theoretical fases of biology which do 
^^^'' hot require laboratory study ar considerd. The doctrin of evolu- 
^^^^^ W constitutes the main thred of the course, but especial emfasis 
^''^" lis placed on the subjects of heredity and plant and animal breed- 
^'° ling The subject of animal behavior receivs some attention. This 
course should be of equal value to the student who is studying 
^science for its own sake and to the student in the agricultural 
course who is seeking principles which hav practical application 
in his work. Major. 

Prerequisit : Courses 3 and 4 or their equivalent. 
Text: Jordan and Kellogg's Evolution and Animal Life, 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
Economic Entomology 

Three double periods, 1 lecture and 1 recitation per week. 
Spring term, 1919. 

This course deals specifically with the insect pests which af- 
fect the plants of field, garden, and orchard, and with those which 
ar responsible for the spred of human and animal diseases. Many 
of the double periods ar spent in the field studying the insects at 
work on the plants. Life-history studies ar made and preventiv 
mesures ar discust. The library is supplied with an abundance of 
literature on the subject. Major. 

Prerequisit: Course 13 or equivalent. 



76 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SIXTEEN 
Plant Morfology _ 

This course consists of a detaild study of representativ types] 
from each of the four great groups of the plant kingdom, all from 
the morfological point of view. Plants ar selected for study which 
illustrate all the various methods of reproduction and which con- 
stitute a complete evolutionary series. The laboratory work in- 
cludes some training in histological methods and the students ar 
allowd to prepare for themselvs permanent miscroscopic slides of 
such material studied as will be of value to a high-school teacher. 

Prerequisit: Courses 5 and 6 or equivalent. Major. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, 
Vol. I. 

Two double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation per 
week. Fall term, 1918-19, and each alternate year thereafter. 

COURSE SEVENTEEN 
Plant Physiology 

This course consists of a detaild study of the various physi- 
ological processes of plants, such as nutrition, growth, and move- 
ment. The plant cell as the unit of function is studied in much 
detail and the influence of external stimuli on plants and the re- 
lation of plants to soil and other environmental conditions ar topics 
which receiv attention. Permission is given the students to make i 
for themselvs permanent microscopic slides showing sections ofl| 
the principal organs of the typical higher plants. Major. 

Prerequisit: Courses 5 and 6 or their equivalent. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles. 
Vol. I. 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 recitation 
per week. Winter term. 



COURSE EIGHTEEN 
Plant Ecology 



i 



In this course a study of the influence of environmental fac- 
tors on plant structures and plant distribution forms the basis of 
the work. The more important factors which control plant growth 
and development ar considerd and many applications of the princi- 
ples discoverd in this study ar made to agricultural practises. The 
course includes field work and the solving of simple ecological 
problems by the different members of the class. Major. 

Prerequisit: Courses 16 and 17 or equivalent. 

Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, 
Vol. II. 

Three double periods for laboratory and field work, 1 lecture, 
and 1 quiz per week. Some field work on Saturdays. Spring term, 
1919. 



111 ft 

lides 
teaci 



/i^inow State Normal University 77 

COURSE NINETEEN 
Plant Pathology 
This course consists of a study of the more important plant 
lisease whlh are caused by fungi, bacteria, and slime molds 
S^tlTe early weeks of the fall term a large part of the time 
spent in mak^^ collections of diseased plants and Plant organs 
he rest of the time is spent in lerning to identify the different 
iiiseases in making culture studies of the parasitic organisms m 
'he making of permanent microscopic slides of diseased plant tis- 
sues and L the consideration of preventiv and curativ mesures. 
Text : Duggar's Plant Diseases. 

Prereauisit : Botany 5 and 6. , . . ^„„ 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 quiz per 
i^^i^eek. Some field work on Saturdays. Fall term and first half of 
^«f- Ij^rinter term, 1917-18. iy2 majors. 

COURSE TWENTY 
General Bacteriology 
Pliyjl This is a general laboratory course in bacteriology. Bacteria 
m ar considerd in their relations to soil fertility, to food P^eservati^^^^ 
m md to animal diseases, including human diseases. Culture studies 
ihefl ,of some typical forms ar made and the general technique of the 
•topi isub ect is masterd. The work includes the making of permanent 
Imicroscope slides which become the property of the students. 
Text: Jordan's General Bacteriology. 

Prerequisit: Botany 5 and 6. • ^„„ 

Three double laboratory periods, 1 lecture, and 1 quiz per 
:owi[week. Last half of winter term and spring term, 1918. IVa majors. 
COURSE TWENTY-ONE 
Nature-Study Supervision 
A course for superintendents and supervisors of nature study. 
It includes a survey of nature-study material, observation of na- 
ture-study lessons in the training school, practis in conducting 
classroom and field work, discussion of the present problems m 
nature study with plans for their solution. Fall term. Major. 



m 



a 



I 



^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE TWENTY-TWO 
Nature-Study Organization 
This course follows Course 21. It deals with the winter as 
pect of nature-study material, trees, birds, etc., physical anc 
chemical phenomena that may be used in elementary grades ar 
ranging a course in nature study. Winter term. Major. 

COURSE TWENTY-THREE 
School and Home Gardens 
Work in practical gardening, with experiments, methods ol 
managing and directing children's gardens, the relation of gar- 
dening to other fases of nature study, supervizion of class gar- 
dens and inspection of home gardens of the children. Sprii 
term. Major. ^ 

COURSE TWENTY-FOUR ■. 

The Nutritiv Process ^ 

An advanst course in physiology dealing especially with di-l 
gestion and nutrition, and required of all students graduating in ' 
.domestic science. Major. 

Prerequisits ar Chemistry 1 and Zoology 3. Winter term. 
Text: Stiles' Nutritional Physiology. 

COURSE TWENTY-FIVE 
Sanitation and Public Hygiene 
A systematic application of chemistry, physiology and bac-' 
tenology to modern helth problems. Recommended to student« 
who ar to graduate in domestic science. Major. 

Prerequisits: Biology 6, and 9 or 24, Chemistry 12 3 4 
Spring term. ' ' ' V 

Text: Sedgwick's Principles of Sanitary Science. .a 




m 

ernL 



Illinois State Normal University 7^ 



GEOGRAFY 



COURSE ONE 
Elementary Physiografy 
01 « The earth as a planet, the atmosfere, the ocean, the land. 
igg iField lessons, excursions, wether observations, simple experiments, 
Sn study of topografic maps, etc., give concreteness to the work. 
" This course or its equivalent is prerequisit to all other courses 
in the department. All terms. Major. ' ^ . ^ ^^ _ , 
Texts : Salisbury's Modem Geografy, Physiografy Note-Boofz, 
Four Pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE TWO 
Human Geografy 
Influence of natural conditions on the development of the 
occupations of man. Topografy and climatic conditions of the 
earth- vegetation zones as determind by natural conditions; re- 
lation to human actitvity. Typical regions studied; general ap- 
plication to all regions of similar conditions. The course deals 
mainly with those topics given under the topical outline for the 
,Btudy of a continent in the fifth and seventh years of the State 
^.Course of Study. Winter, spring. Minor credit. 

For students following the two-year or three-year program. 
Texts • Herbertson's Man and His Work; Bartholomew's Eco- 
nomic Atlas; Four pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 
(6 weeks.) 

COURSE THREE 
General Geografy of the World 
Covers essentially the same ground as Course 2, with a larger 
selection of typical regions and more extensiv library reading. 
Texts: Same as Course 2. (12 weeks.) Major. Fall term. 

COURSE FOUR 
Geografy of North America 
Introductory study of the continent as a whole: Detaild 
study of the United States by physiografic and industrial re- 
gions; briefer study of other countries of North America. Nat- 
ural conditions as influencing industrial development considerd 
thruout the course. Extensiv library reading required. Deals 



1,1 



80 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

with topics of State Course of Study pertaining to North America 
in the fifth and sixth years. Fall, spring, first summer terms 
Major. 

Texts : Four pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. Tarr 
and McMurray's New Complete Geografy, Second Book. Bar- 
tholomew's Economic Atlas. 

Courses 4, 5, or 6 may be chosen by students to complete the 
work of geografy in any of the regular programs. 

COURSE FIYE ' 

Primary Geografy I 

An examination of the course of study for all grades, withi 
especial attention to subject-matter and method for third, fourth,! 
and fifth grades; local field lessons and observation of lessons in 
training school. Spring term. Major. 

Texts : Dodge's The Teaching of Geografy in the Elementary] 
Schools; State Course of Study; Course of Study in Training School;] 
Four Pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE SIX 

Commercial Geografy 

Conditions both natural and artificial favoring commercial! 
development; Study centerd about commodities of wide use, aa^ 
food, clothing, shelter, etc. Commodities of importance in 'the' 
United States given fullest treatment. Most important com- 
modities of each continent considerd. Causal idea in geografy 
prominent thruout course. Extensiv library reading required. 
Deals with industrial topics of the fifth, seventh, and eighth years 
of State Course of Study. All terms. Major. 

Texts: Smith's Industrial and Commercial Geografy, Bar- 
tholomew's Economic Atlas. ^ 

COURSE SEVEN j 

Geografy of South America 

This course develops a method of continental study as re- 
quired in seventh and eighth years' work of the State Course of 
Study. South America servs admirably as a type continent t 
work out a geografic sequence, — position, surface, climate, lif( 
industry, and commerce. A regional study of South America 
made on the basis of physiografic division. Major. 

Texts: Bowman's South America; Bartholomew's Economie 
Atlas. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Geografy of the Eastern Continents 

A study of Asia, Africa, and Australia, covering the eight! 
year's work of the State Course of Study. Major. 
Text: Mill's International Geografy. 



Illinois State Normal University 81 

COUNTRY SCHOOL COURSES 

COURSE NINE 

Elementary Physical Geografy 
This is similar to Course 1, but the work will be adapted to 
the teaching of Fourth Year Geografy as outlined in the State 
Course of Study. Spring term. Major. 

Texts: Salisbury's Modern Geografy; Four Pamflets on Im- 
portant Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE TEN 
p Geografy Method For Country School 

A thoro analysis of the State Course of Study; material and 
methods for developing the State Course; emfasis to be placed 
on the portions of the course to be taught during the next school 
year, fall term. Fall term. Major. 

Texts: Tarr and McMurry's New Second Book; Four Pam- 
flets on Important Topics in Geografy; Bartholomew's Atlas; 
Herbertson's Man and His Work. 



l! SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

Senior college courses in geografy ar open to students who 
hav completed the required work of the previous courses, or any 
of these courses may be substituted for Courses 4, 5, 6, or 7, by 
senior normal-school students. Courses 11, 12, 13, will be taught 
!in 1918-19; Courses 14, 15, 16 in 1917-18. 

Il COURSE ELEVEN 

Geografy of Europe 



I 



,Bi 



An introductory study of Eurasia as a land mass, with more 
detaild consideration of the physiografy, climate, vegetiation, and 
people of Europe. A regional study of the continent, dealing 
\ with leading countries, their relation to each other, to the United 
States, and to the rest of the world. Special topics for library 
study. Major. 

Texts: The Continent of Europe, Lyde; Longman's Atlas. 

COURSE TWELV 

Method in Geografy 

Scope of geografy as a school study; the basis of a course 
of study, its orderly development and methods of presentation 



!i|lii 



82 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

in the grades and the high school. Detaild work on a limited 
portion of the course of study by each member of class; prepara- 
tion of reference lists for collateral reading; observation in train- 
ing department. For superintendents, principals, and special teach- 
ers of geografy. Major. 

Texts: McMurry's Special Method in Geografy; State Course 
of Study; Course of Study in Training School; Four Pamflets on 
Important Topics in Geografy. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Advanst Physiogbafy 

Life history of land forms; study and construction of maps 
and models; field lessons, meteorology; study and construction 
of wether maps; oceanografy. Chief topics of Course 1 treated 
from the standpoint of the teacher, with much more library ref- 
erence reading, field and laboratory work. For high-school teach- 
ers. Major. 

Text: Salisbury's Physiografy. (12 weeks.) 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

General Geology 

A study of geologic processes usually treated in physical' 
geografy, followd by historical geology which deals with the mora! 
important events of geological history. Major. Fall term. 

Text: Chamberlain and Salisbury's Introductory Geology. < 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Climatology . 

A study of the atmosfere, its general circulation, cyclonic^ 
storms, etc.; climate as a geografical factor; its influence on manl 
and the industries. Major. Winter term. 

Text: Milham's Meteorology. ] 

COURSE SIXTEEN | 

Conservation of Natural Resources -i 

A study of the natural resources of the United States and 
the world; their use and their conservation; the conservation 
movement in the United States, with especial reference to soil, 
forests, minerals, water. Major. Spring term. 

Text: Van Hise's The Conservation of Natural Resources in 
the United States. J 

% 



Illinois State Normal University 83 



HISTORY 



lei 



ojy. 



COURSE TWO 

The Founding of the American Nation 

This course is for graduates of the eighth grade entering the 
'jountry-school program of the Normal School and for those in- 
nding to prepare for entrance into the Teachers College. The 
'period studied extends from the discovery of America to the fall 
of the Federalist party in 1800. Attention is given to the study 
of Illinois history from the national point of view in accordance 
with the recommendations of the Illinois State Course of Study. 
Upper grade text-books in general use in Illinois ar examind and 
methods of using them are discust. The work is supplemented 
thruout with library work. Minor credit A — K. Fall, spring, and 
first summer terms. 
■iM Text: Forman's Advanced History. 

COURSE THREE 

The Growth of the American State 

This course continues the work of Course 2, bringing the 
narrativ down to the present. Relativly more time is spent on the 
history of our own state than in Course 2. Minor credit A — K. 
jyclonjWinter and second summer terms. 

Text: Forman's Advanced History. 

COURSE FOUR 

A.MERICAN History to the Civil War 
This course is intended for students who have studied U. S. 
History in the high school or who hav taught the subject. The 
course consists of a summary of European conditions during the 
15th and 16th centuries of our colonial and revolutionary eras, 
louBfoUowd by a study of social, industrial, and political development 
during our national period to the civil war. Major. Winter and 
first summer terms. 

Text: A Short History of the United States, Bassett. 

COURSE FIVE 

Recent American History 

An intensiv study of our development since the Civil War. 
The work of Reconstruction, followd by an analysis of our social, 
industrial, and political development since 1876. Major. Spring 
and second summer terms. 

Text: A Short History of the United States Bassett. 

a large number of different courses in history and civics ar taught because of the 
varying needs of students. Care should be taken to see that students enter the right class. 



vtai 



84 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SIX 
History Method in Lower Grades 
This course is to giv the student an understanding of the 
meaning of history and its purposes in the grades. The State 
Course of Study and the course in the training school furnish 
the materials for the course. After a theoretical consideration 
of method in history, class exercizes in history in the training 
school furnish the basis for discussions and unifications of the 
work of the course. Major. Fall term. 

COURSE SEVEN 

History Method for High Schools 

This course is a study of the materials of history and the 
forms in which they ar recorded; the six chief lines of human 
activity, the social, industrial, political, religious, educational, 
and ethical; the scope of history in the high school, its aims, 
methods of study and recitation. Emfasis will be laid upon the 
selection and organization of materials of value to the history 
teacher in secondary schools. Major. Winter term. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Ancient History 

This course is intended for non-high-school graduates. It 
carries the student from the earliest historical period to the in- 
vasions of the Roman Empire. It shows the contribution made hy] 
each of the early peoples toward the civilization of the race. Par- 
ticular attention is given to the ancient republics and to the intro- 
duction of Christianity. Fall and summer terms. Minor in A — K. 

Text : The Ancient World, West. 

COURSE NINE 
Medieval History 

This course is intended for the students who hav had An- 
cient History. The origin and development of institutions and 
the progress of the people receiv the greater emfasis. It is the 
study of European development from the migrations to the Re- 
naissance. Winter and summer terms. Minor credit A — K. 

Text: History of Western Europe, Robinson. 

COURSE TEN 
Modern European History 

This is a study of the expansion of Europe in the 16th cen- 
tury, the religious and political revolutions, and the unifica- 
tion of Italy and Germany. Emfasis is laid upon a view of pres- 
ent day conditions, problems, and tendencies in Europe, as well 
as upon the relations of Europe with America. Spring and sum- 
mer terms. Major, 

Text : History of Western Europe, Robinson. 



Illinois State Normal University 85 

COURSE ELEVEN 

English History 

This course develops the narrativ of English History from 

le beginning of the Tudor period to the present. The text is 

iipplemented by extensiv library work on the more important 

^^ nes of development. The influence of English History upon 

^ lat of America; England as a sea power and her part as an 

''^^i igent of civilization; the industrial revolution; and the rise of 

lemocracy receiv especial attention. Major. 

Text : Short History of England, Cheney. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE THIRTEEN 

American History 

This course is an intensiv study of the colonial and revo- 
itionary periods of American history. It is intended for pros- 
ectiv high-school teachers of history, politics, and social science, 
mfasis is laid upon the economic, social, and political conditions 
f colonial life; upon the growth of self-government and the 
nes of development that made separation from England necessary. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

This is similar in method to Course 13 and covers the period 
?om 1783 to the Civil War. Federalist supremacy; the Jefferson- 
"'^^'^ %n system; rise of national spirit; growth and influence of the 
f^' !Vest, development of transportation facilities; parties and party 
iM government, slavery, abolition, and the Civil War. 
A-i 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

This is a study of Reconstruction, with the resulting southern 
iroblems; growth of municipalities; commercial expansion; rise 
f corporations, and other recent problems. Emfasis is laid upon 
j AiM^^^'^^ changes and lines of development. 

Courses 13, 14, and 15 will be given in 1917-18 and in alternate 
ears thereafter. 



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aim 
)iitl 



k 



s a V 

13 tl 



COURSE SIXTEEN 

European History 

This course, as well as Courses 17 and 18, ar intended for 
pecial students in history and prospectiv social science teachers, 
'hey are similar in method to Courses 13, 14, and 15. The end 
f the political and social conditions of the so-cald Middle Ages is 
riefly considerd, foUowd by a study of the Renaissance with its 
multiplicity of interests; the Protestant Reformation, its causes, 
pred into different countries and resulting religious wars; the 
'eace of Westphalia, with a review of economic, social and 
'Olitical conditions at the time. 



I 



86 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE SEVENTEEN 
European History 1648-1815 
The chief subjects considerd ar: The era of absolutism, with 
its dynastic wars — Colonization — Industrial Revolution, French 
Revolution and Napoleonic periods — Congress of Vienna, 1815. 

COURSE EIGHTEEN 
European History 1815-1900 

Review of economic and social conditions — Metternich's sys- 
tem — revolt, and growth of liberal ideals, France under Napoleon 
III; unification of Italy and Germany; Russia and the Balkans, 
growth of democracy; situation at the opening of the twentieth 
century. 

Texts used in Courses 16 to 18 ar Robinson and Beard's The 
Development of Modem Europe (2 vols.), and the accompanying; 
Readings (2 vols.) 

Given in 1918-19, and in alternate years thereafter. 

CIVICS 

COURSE ONE 

Elementary Civics 

This course is for beginners who hav neither studied civics ini 
the high school nor had any experience in teaching it, and desire 
to prepare for a county elementary certificate. An effort is made! 
to gain an insight into the spirit, form, and functions of our gov-i 
ernment. Minor. Fall and spring terms. 

Text : Forman's The American Republic, , ^ 

t 

COURSE TWO ' i 

Ad van ST Civics \ 

An advanst course in civics intended for students who havj 
had the elementary work or hav had experience as teachers of; 
this subject. The origin and growth of laws and institutions ar 
studied. The relation of our constitution to colonial charters, to 
the political experiences of the provincial era, as well as to the 
English constitution, is traced with care. 

The rights and duties of the citizen, his relation to the nation, 
to the states, and the units of local government ar considerd as 
essential topics. In placing these mutual relations the machinery 
of the government is studied, as ar the effects of its workings as 
seen in history. Party machinery for nominating and for carrying 
out its policies is studied. Fall and summer terms. Major. 

Texts: Civil Government in the United States, Fiske; Ad- 
vanced Civics, Forman. 



Illinois State Normal University 87 

COURSE THREE 

Political Science 

, This course deals with the nature, scope, and methods of 

political science; the nature, functions, and sfere of the state; 

nationality, citizenship, its rights and duties; constitutions, their 

sources and kinds; th^ distribution of government powers. Major. 

Text: Introduction to Political Science, Garner. Fall term. 

COURSE FOUR 
Political Parties 4nd Party Machinery 
A study of the history of political parties in the United States 
,«..d the development of party machinery. The course begins 
with the organization of the Federalist and Republican parties 
under the leadership of Hamilton and Jefferson in Washington's 
administration and traces those parties to their dissolution in 
1820-24. The rise and fall of the Congressional nominating 
caucus, together with the development of the legislativ caucus 
covering the same period, will be studied in connection with the 
history of the Federalist and Republican parties. The rise of the 
Whig and Democratic parties as successors to the Federalist and 
Republican parties will next be considerd, together with the origin 
and history of the National Nominating Convention. The organ- 
•-« ization of the Republican party of today and the history of that 
\m party, together with that of the Democratic party, to the present 
time. The rise of the Primary system toward a National Primary 
for nominating President and Vice-President. The initiativ, 
referendum, and recall platforms, the party boss and his system, 
\ along with prominent party leaders as Jefferson, Hamilton, DeWitt 
Clinton, Martin Van Buren, Thurlow Weed, Robert Toombs, Jef- 
ferson Davis, Thaddeus Stevens and Marcus Hanna. Winter term. 
Texts: Parties and Party Machinery, Macy; History of the 
Presidency, Stanwood. Major. 

COURSE FIVE 
Municipal Government 
A study of the rapid growth of cities in the United States 
and how they ar governd. The field of city government as dis- 
tinguisht from state and national government. Problems of city 
government, as sanitation, transportation, lighting, garbage, parks, 
police, etc., will be considerd in detail. The city boss and his 
systems; elections and nominating machinery. The Mayor-Alder- 
manic system and the rise and extension of the Commission form 
of city government. Spring term. Major. 



88 Annual Catalog and Course of Study M 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

COURSE ONE 

Elementary Economics 

This course, for Section P, aims to assemble the industrial 
facts alredy known to the students, to supplement these thru di- 
rect observation, to organize and systematize all with the help of 
a minimum of theory, and to introduce the student to economic 
questions of the day. Minor. 

Texts: Ely and Wicker's Elementary Economics. Winter 
term. 

COURSE TWO 
Economics 2 

In the belief that the social environment is largely economic 
and that to understand it so as to get the most out of life or so as 
to help solv the complex problems that menace democracy some 
knowledge of economics is necessary, this course has been pro- 
gramd for all seniors, whether they ar looking towards teaching 
in the grades or in the high school. 

It affords, for an introductory course, a fairly comprehensiv 
survey of economic theory and of economic problems. Seager's 
Principles of Economics is the text and is coverd in the twelv 
weeks by the students working up for themselvs portions of the 
text along with appropriate supplementary readings, while the 
recitation periods ar devoted to the more difficult chapters. In 
the development of the theory constant use is made of concrete 
problems. The course is taught every term. Major. t 

COURSE THREE • ' 

Advanst Economics 3 

One or more great economic topics and the related problems of 
the day ar studied. As it is usually best to take topics of greatest 
public interest at the time when the course is given, it is not 
practicable to announce these in advance. The work for the winter 
of 1916-17 was a study of the history of prices with an analysis of 
the causes of the variation of prices during the present war. This 
course will be taught in the winter of 1918-19, alternating with 
Advanst Economics 4, which will be given in 1917-18. Prerequisit, 
Economics 2. Winter term. Major. ' 



I 



COURSE FOUR 
Advanst Economics 4 



This course will be taught in the winter of 1917-18 and is a 
course similar to and alternating with Advanst Economics 3, but 
devoted to different topics and problems. Prerequisit, Economics 2. 



Illinois State Normal University 89 

COURSE FIVE 

Sociology 
This course includes a discussion of the scope of sociology 
d of the causes that affect the life of society; of the nature of 
ciety, of its constituent elements and of the relation between 
e individual and society, of social evolution from consanguin or- 
.nization thru the era of the state to internationalism. The 
ore practical fases of the subject receiv attention. The facts 
ertaining to population form the basis for a discussion of prob- 
ms of immigration, of rural and city life. Social questions 
jonnected with the family organization, or arising from our sys- 
tem of labor, or from the unequal distribution of welth, and in 
particular those of special interest to teachers — such as the state's 
eatment of dependents, defectivs, and delinquents — receiv atten- 
on. Major. 

Taught every spring and summer term and in the fall of 1917 
land alternate years thereafter. 

Only students who hav completed Economics 2 or an equivalent 
P|^eourse may be admitted to the fall term classes. 

Text: Hayes's Introduction to the Study of Sociology. 

COURSE SIX 

Social Problems 

This course will be taught in the fall of 1918 and alternate 
'jjlyears thereafter. It includes the briefest possible preliminary 
survey of sociological theory and a careful study of several great 
problems that ar sociological rather than economic — such as immi- 
gration, crime, poverty and pauperism. EUwood's Sociology and 
\Social Problems and Wolfe's Readings in Sociology form the basis 
bf the work. Prerequisit, Economics 2. Major. 

COURSE SEVEN 

American Industrial History 

A text-book (Bogart's), constructed on the chronological 
plan, is used, but the lines of development ar kept distinct and 
continuous thruout the course. Course Seven alternates with 
Course Eight and will be taught in the spring term, 1918. Prere- 
quisit, Economics 2. Major. 



CKl 



COURSE EIGHT 
English Industrial History 

This course is similar to, and taught alternately with, Course 
Seven. Taught in the spring term of 1919, etc. Prerequisit, Eco- 
nomics 2. Major. 

Texts: Cheney's Industrial and Social History of England; 
Hayes's British Social Politics, 



90 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



LITERATURE 



COURSE ONE 
Poetry and the Novel 

Classroom study of the minor epic in Mathew Arnold's Sohrah 
and Rustum, and the novel in George Eliot's Silas Marner. Out- 
side of the class a further study is made of narrativ verse, usually 
Tennyson's Princess or The Idylls of the King, and of the novel in 
one of Scott's or Hawthorne's novels. This is followd by careful 
class discussion, in which both the substance and the artistic 
structure and value of these masterpieces ar considerd. In 1917-18 
The Princess and Quentin Durward. Winter and summer terms. 
Minor in A — K. 

Texts: Sohrab and Rustum, Riverside Literature Series. 
Silas Marner, Appleton's. The Princess, Rolfe's. Idylls of the King, 
Rolfe's. 

COURSE TWO 

Poetry, Essays or Speeches, and the Novel 

Lyric and narrativ verse in the volume of selections fromj 
Wordsworth, made by Matthew Arnold, and two books of the great' 
epic Paradise Lost form the basis of the classroom work. The out-' 
side work consists of reading from Emerson's Essays, First SerieSt 
and selected essays from Lamb's Essays of Elia, or Arnold's Culture] 
and Anarchy, or Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, speeches by Burke or' 
Webster, and a novel by one of the greater novelists. This outside( 
reading is foilowd by careful class discussion. In 1917-18 Sartor] 
Resartus and Thackeray's Pendennis. Minor in A — K. 

COURSE THREE j 

Shakspere r 

Two plays ar studied in detail in class; in 1917-18, Macbeth 
and King John. Outside of the class three more plays by Shakes- 
pere or Marlow^e, ar red and then carefully discust in class. In 1917- 
18 Richard III, The Tempest and The Winter's Tale. 

Some attention is given to the Elizabethan theaters, the cir- 
cumstances under which they came into existence, and the condi- 
tions under w^hich plays were presented in them. The chief pur- 
pose of the course, however, is to give an understanding of the* 
drama, its essential nature, its structure, its limitations, and its 
powers, and, more defmitly still, to make students intelligent read- 
ers of Shakspere themselvs, and intelligent guides to others. Win- 
ter, spring, and summer terms. Minor in A — K. 

Texts : Shakspere, Arden, Rolfe's, Hudson's, or Porter's First 
Folio Edition. 






irtisi 
ten 



Illinois State Normal University 91 

COURSE FOUR 
Literature Method 
This is a comprehensiv course in method and the conditions 
at determin method. It includes a study of the essential nature 
literature; its right to a place in the curriculum; its proper 
pinction there; the various facts and conditions to be considerd in 
iietermining a course of study in literature from the first primary 
the last high-school year; and of the problems that arise in the 
Jctual teaching in the elementary and the high school. This work 
'0 Js based on Colby's Literature and Life in School, and requires a 
0#ood deal of library work. In the fall term the course givs more 
»areful attention to the primary grades, in the winter to the high 
ive!||chool, in the spring to the upper grades. All terms. Major. 

TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

COURSE FIVE 
Literary Types 
vu_ This should be the first course in literature taken by students 
k |)f the Teachers College. It includes a study of lyric and narrativ 
,/erse, of the essay, the novel, and the drama. Its purpose is to 
nake clear what kind of knowledge of these literary types and 
what sympathetic and intelligent mastery of individual works m 
the several type forms ar necessary for one who would teach 
ithem intelligently. It servs as an introduction to the more com- 
prehensiv course in method and to the more advanst special 
Bourses in these several fields of literature. Fall and summer 
terms. Major. 

Text: Johnson's Forms of English Poetry. 

COURSE SIX 

English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century 

Page's British Poets of the Nineteenth Century is used as 

text. Study is made of the characteristic themes dwelt upon by 

ithe poets red, of their characteristic modes of thinking and feeling 

of their favorit verse forms and their mastery of these forms, and 

of their relations to their times and their significance in the socia 

and intellectual and artistic life of the nineteenth century. Fall 

""JI and summer terms. Major. 

COURSE SEVEN 
History of Literature 
fpg« This course covers the history of English literature down to 
.(« the nineteenth century. Major. 
l^l Text: A History of English Literature, Lovett. Winter term. 

reai 
fill 



e( 

lUtjii 



a 



92 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE EIGHT 
History op English Literature Since 1800 and of 
/ American Literature 

The scope of the course is indicated by its title. 
Texts: Moody and Lovett's History of English Literature 
Halleck's History of American Literature Calhoun and Mac- 
Alarney's Readings from American Literature, Spring term 
Major. 

COURSE NINE 

College Course in Shakspere 

For this course the student should hav a complete editioi 
of Shakspere, and MacCracken, Pierce, and Durham's Introductioi 
to Shakspere. From fifteen to twenty plays ar studied, including 
comedies, histories, and tragedies from Shakspere's earliest worl 
to his latest. Questions of sources, time of composition, plotting 
characterization, motivation, language, technique, and dramatit 
power ar discust with reference to the plays. The Elizabethai 
stage and its influence on the structure and mode of presentatioi 
of plays ar considerd. Pedagogical questions ar discust incident- 
ally. Spring term. Major. 

COURSE TEN 

American Poetry 

This is a course in rapid reading of the American poets fron 
Bryant to Moody and Peabody. While most attention is giver 
to the work of Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier 
Holmes, Lowell, Whitman, and Lanier, who ar included in th( 
text used, the course is ment also to give some knowledge of sucl 
later or minor poets as Aldrich, Sill, Guiney, Peabody, Moody 
Tucker, Carman, Hovey, and Gilder. The text is Page's Chie, 
American Poets. Fall term 1917 and alternate years thereafter 
and summer terms. Major. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

English Drama 

This is the study of the development of the drama froir 
the miracle plays down to the closing of the theaters by Parlia- 
ment. It requires a rapid reading of many Elizabethan playj 
chosen from Lyly, Kyd, Greene, Marlowe, Shakspere, Dekker 
Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Heywood, Middleton, Ford, Web- 
ster, and Massinger. It includes a study of the relation of the 
drama and the theater to the Elizabethan and Jacobean worlds. 
It should give the student the power to see Shakspere in a truer 
perspectiv. Major. 

The text used is Neilson's Chief Elizabethan Dramatists, but 
a great deal of library work is required on periods not coverd by 
this. Winter term, 1917-18, and alternate years thereafter. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 93 

COURSE TWELV 
The English Novel. 
With but slight consideration of the literary forms that 
|nally made the novel possible, this course procedes from Rich- 
irdson thru Fielding, Smollet, Sterne, Goldsmith, Walpole, Mrs. 
.ladcliffe, Fanny Burney, Miss Edgeworth, Scott, Jane Austen, 
Dickens, Thackeray, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, George Mere- 
lith, Trollope, Thomas Hardy, and on the American side from 
Jrowne thru Cooper, Mrs. Stowe, Hawthorne, Henry James and 
lowells. It givs some consideration to such typical contemporary 
Snglish and American writers as Bennett, Galsworthy, and Mrs. 
iVharton. Cross's Development of the English Novel is used as a 
edi juide in some mesure, but the library is the main dependence for 
)k Material. Spring term 1918 and alternate years thereafter, and 
icN jiummer terms. Major. 

f; L COURSE THIRTEEN 

English Poetry 



With Manly's English Poetry as text, this course is ment to 
'°^ live some personal knowledge of the tresures of English poetry, 
^^^' iyric and narrativ, from Chaucer to Wordsworth. It is a study 
pf both substance and form of the themes that most ardently 
linterested the English people from time to time in their social 
knd political development, and of the artistic forms borrowd 
from others or created by themselvs as means of expression. Fall 
ierm, 1918 and alternate years thereafter, and summer terms. 
3 SiiH^ajor. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 
Browning 

For this course the student should hav either Macmillan's 
8^* or Houghton Mifflin's one-volume edition of Browning's works. 
«^ It includes a study of the dramatic monolog as developt by 
Browning and of many of his best poems in this form, of his 
^hief lyrics and narrativs, of Pippa Passes, Balanstion's Adven- 
ture, In a Balcony, and The Ring and the Book. Winter term, 
1918-19 and alternate years thereafter, summer terms. Major. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 

Nineteenth Century Prose 

This covers the most important representativ English and 
American prose writers of the nineteenth century. It givs some 
acquaintance with the thought and style especially of Lamb, De 



in 
of 
M 



affl 
Pari 
Dpli 
Deldi 

\m 

o( 



woHBOuincey, Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Emerson, Holmes, Lowell, 
Thoreau, and their significance. Some reading is assignd also in 
Pater, Morley, Macaulay, Huxley, Lincoln, and Repplier. Spring 
'term 1919 and alternate years thereafter, and summer terms. Major. 



94 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



f 



GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE »i 

Aim: 1. To gi\e the student the essential facts of the sub- 
ject. 

2. To prepare him to express these facts in as simple a wi|( 
as is consistent with accuracy. 

3. To show him that topics may be presented in such ad 
order that but one difficulty will be met at a time, and that thisj 
when masterd, will prepare the way for others; to show also that 
such an order makes it possible to acquire nice discriminatic 
from the first, and that power to make fine distinctions is one ol 
the chief values of the subject. 

4. To enable him to apply in a practical way the theory 
that because of the analytical nature of our language the thought 
element must predominate over the form element in the study 
of its grammar. 

Topics: Part I. The Sentence. The simple sentence with" 
its essential elements is first considerd; then element after element 
is added until all ordinary English construction has been studied, 
The parts of speech ar defined as the development of the sentence 
makes their introduction necessary, but only such classification is 
made as is based on use. 

Part II. Parts of Speech. Classification, summary of uses. 
inflection. Text-book : Gowdy. 

The subject as outlined above is given at three different rates 
of speed : 

Course One (12 weeks) for high-school graduates. 

Courses Two and Three (18 weeks) for Section L. 

Courses Four and Five (24 weeks) for Sections M, N, and 0. 

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

A brief course showing the development of English idioms 
and the chief phenomena of grammatical and orthografic change 

It discusses the relation of English to other languages, th< 
development of the standard speech, and the growth of the Englisl' 
vocabulary, with special emfasis upon the nativ element. Spring 
term. Major. 

Text: History of the English Language, Emerson. 

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC 

People compose whenever they speak or write their own 
thought. If the composition is poor, it is usually because the 
thinking is ill-orderd. Every teacher who insists upon logical 
thinking and clear statement is a teacher of composition. While 
it is true that the forms of composition may be discust and 
standards determirid in a class dealing with the forms of discourse, 
it is found, as in spelling or pronunciation, that correct habits ai 
establisht only when all teachers unite to see that correct forms ai. 



tliei 



Illinois State Normal University 95 

ised at all times. The best form is that which best fits the content, 
he best practis in composition is not in miscellaneous "exercizes" 
fith no purpose or value outside of practis. It is obtaind rather 
[1 writing and speaking matter that would need to be written and 
poken even if there were no class in composition. 

The work in Nature Study and Elementary Physics consists 
argely of observation. To giv deflnitness to the observations, 
hall ,nd to make just comparisons possible, these observations must 
^ lie recorded. Similarly the results of observations and compari- 
iilBons need to be stated in organized form. 

For the reasons stated above, instruction and practis in ele- 
bentary composition needed by first-year students is given in 
still jonnection with the elementary science. Besides this instruction 
k here ar offerd to students the following courses: 



8 01 



i?es, 



. COURSE ONE 

It 

|v Composition 



An elementary course based on Huntington's Composition, 
^ Ud Woolley's Handbook of Composition; required of students in 
Ihe preparatory program and recommended to others who lack 
sarly training in composition. Fall term. Minor. 

§ COURSE TWO 

l-\(: Rhetoric 

This is a practical course in the science of rhetoric and art 
)f composition. Two papers a week ar written and criticized. 
Smfasis is laid on the mechanics of Composition — punctuation, 
pelling, and paragrafiing. The study of letters and letter-writ- 
ing is an important part of the course. Scott and Denney's Com- 
oosition-Rhetoric is the text. Minor in A — K. 



COURSE THREE 
Science of Discourse 

This is an advanst course based on Barrett Wendell's English 
Composition and Herbert Spencer's Philosophy of Style, 

Two weekly themes ar required. The criticism and discussion 
""of these occupy two periods of each week. 

For admission to Course 3 students should hav the prepara- 
tion stated on page 17. Lacking this they take Courses 1 and 2 
in rhetoric and at least two courses in literature. Major. 

COURSE FOUR 

Special English 

'^W. An elementary course in composition ojfferd for those who 
ar deficient. Huntington's Elements of English Composition 
is used as a text. No credit. 



96 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ORTHOGRAFY 



i 



The purpose of this course and of the course in spelling is to 
prepare students to teach the orthografy outlined for the seventh 
and eighth years in the Illinois State Course of Study. It con- 
sists mainly of word-analysis and drill in marking diacritically 
and pronouncing five hundred or more words in common use 
which ar frequently mispronounst; such as, address, alternate, 
apparatus, bouquet, comparable, def, extol, genuin, government, 
idea, and a great deal of drill in the use of the dictionary. In 
the analysis of words, the meaning of the most frequently re- 
curring roots, prefixes, and suffixes ar lernd. The three rules 
of spelling given in the Illinois State Course of Study ar lernd 
and applied, and at least one week is given to simplified spelling. 

In the three-year program it is a six weeks' course; in the 
four-year program it is a twelv weeks' course. All terms. 

SPELLING (5 Weeks, or Longer if Necessary) 

All students, including those admitted to Section F, ar offerd 
an examination in spelling on the sixth and eleventh Fridays o^ 
each term. Those who show by such examination the ability to 
spell ninety out of .one hundred familiar words, such as lose, 
led. busy, until, separate, reference, occurd, notable, ridiculous, 
accommodate, recommend, ar excused from further work in spell- 
ing. Those who do not pass the examination ar required to take 
a course of six weeks, or longer if necessary, and take it the follow- 
ing term. Due attention is given to the simplified forms recom- 
mended by the Simplified Spelling Board and authorized by the 
New Standard and the New International dictionaries. 

No student is recommended for a teachers' certificate or for 
a position to teach or for a diploma until he has carried spelling. 

PENMANSHIP 

WRITING DRILL. (6 Weeks, or Longer if Necessary) 

The object of this course is to enable students to improve 
their writing if it is manifestly illegible or in bad form. It in- 
cludes blackboard drill in movement exercizes, as outlined in the 
Illinois State Course of Study, with musical accompaniment to 
secure smoothness and harmony of movements. It is a required 
subject for those whose writing is distinctly poor. 

Penmanship according to the Palmer Method is taught, also in 
another section vertical script better adapted to schoolroom use. 
Minor credit. 



♦ 



Illinois State Normal University 
Phonics and Dictionary Work 



97 




(6 weeks; one-half credit) 

I This course is required of all students, and should be taken as 
n as practicable after matriculation. 
However, students who ar proficient in the use of the diction- 
may be excused from taking the course, the test of proficiency 
ing an examination offerd on the first day of each term, and on 
eding days until completed. 

In programs L, M, N, P one-half credit is allowd for this 
rse, whether taken in class or by examination; in all other 
grams no credit is given. 

OUTLINE OF COURSE 

Knowledge of elementary sounds, markings and equiva- 

Teaching Websterian and Standard keys. 

2. Practical rules for pronunciation. 

3. Drills for correct sounds. 

List of words (400) commonly mispronounst. 

4. Definit training in the dictionary, Standard, Webster, 
Century, Murray. 

(a) Teaching where to find different types of words and 
reference such as those in common usage, obsolete, 
foren, mythological, historical, biograflcal. 

(b) Teaching what is given about a word, differences in 
dictionaries. 

(c) Teaching rapid use of dictionaries. 

(d) Teaching the use of dictionaries in the grades. 

5. Training in the use of ready reference books such as 
tiyffe, Roget's Thesaurus, Century Book of Names, Lippincott's 
azetteer. Classical Dictionary. 

Texts : Metcalf and DeGarmo's Dictionary Work. The Stan- 
ard Desk Dictionary. 



98 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

READING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

COURSE ONE 
Elementary Reading 

This is an elementary course designd for those students wh 
hav had little experience in oral reading. Special emfasis is lai 
upon assimilating the thought and then presenting it clearly. 

Phillips' Natural Drills in Expression. Minor. 



COURSE TWO 

The Reading of Prose 
The first consideration in this course is an understandin 



pwP 



the spirit of literature, and that literary appreciation must pL 
cede vocal expression. Then the various essentials of interpre 
tativ readings ar studied; the group as the unit in the process o 
thought-getting, emotional values, succession of ideas, atmosfen 
climax, tone-color, central idea, contrasts, rhythm. A grasp o 
the spirit of literature and the technique of the printed pag 
leads to daily drills in vocal expression. Finally, thruout th 
course reading aloud is made the mesure and test of the student' 
grasp of the absolute life of literature. All terms. 

Texts: Classics for Vocal Expression; Curry. Major. 

COURSE THREE 
The Reading of Poetry 

The primary purpose of this course is to show what poetr; 
is and to train the student in rendering it orally. It deals witi 
various examples of poetic art. 1. Intellectual, imaginativ, am 
emotional aspects of literature. 2. The elements of lyric, epic 
and dramatic poetry. 3. Rhythm, rime, alliteration, assonanct 
tone-color. 4. Analysis as a preparation for oral expressior 
Major. 

Texts: English Poetry, Its Principles and Progress, Gayle: 
and Young. Merchant of Venice. All terms. 

COURSE FOUR 
How TO Teach Reading 
Primary Reading. 
This is a course that discusses the various problems thai 
arise in teaching reading in the public school. Observation lessom 
by the critic teachers run parallel with classroom work. Teach- 
ers expecting to teach in the primary grades should take Divisior 
A of this course and follow it with Story-Telling. Semi-major. 
Text: Pedagogy and Psychology of Reading, Huey. 



Illinois State Normal University 99 

COURSE FIVE 
Method in Advanst Reading. 
This particular division will study the problems that arise 
ihe intermediate and upper grades. Semi-major. 
Text: How to Teach Reading in the Public Schools, Clark. 

COURSE SIX 

The Art of Story-Telling 

This is a course designd to meet the needs of the teacher in 

elementary grades and the high school. It quickens the imag- 
ition, develops the insight into literature, incites growth in the 
rit of literature insted of slavish dependence on the letter of 

selection. It causes the story teller to see clearly and think 

jply and present the great points of the story. The stories 

died will be the world stories that hav influenst the race. They 

11 be taken up in sequence and their relation to the spiritual 

elopment of the race will be shown. Winter, spring, and sum- 

rii; )T terms. Major or Minor credit. 

Text: For the Story Teller, Bailey. 

'I COURSE SEVEN 

Platform Reading 

An advanst course pland especially for those who wish to 
ter contests and for all who feel the need of skill and finish for 
pearing in public. 

The selections studied will be of the highest type of literature 
d great attention will be paid to the interpretation and deliv- 
Open to students who hav completed Course 3 or Course 4. 
Bctiv. Winter term. Major. 

Text: Lessons in Vocal Expression, Chamberlain and Clark. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Extemporaneous Speaking 

The preparation and delivery of original speeches. The stu- 
bt is shown that effectiv speaking grows out of obedience to ae- 
rate laws and that it is never a matter of impulse. The impel- 
|ig motivs, the factors of interestingness, the central idea, the 
ds of speech ar the chief details of this course. Naturalness 
d earnestness ar sought at all times. Subjects ar chosen from 
irrent topics, literature, economics, science, sociology. Special 
jtention is given to the short 3, 5 and 10-minute speech for a 
finit occasion, such as institute, convention, lodge, after-dinner, 
ah, or church. Major. All terms. 

Text : Effectiv Speaking, Phillips. 



1<^0 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE NINE 
Argument 

The theory of argumentation, with practis in preparation 
briefs. This work leads up to oral debates. Here special stre 
is laid on team work and oral delivery. Fall term. Major. 

Text: Argumentation and Debating, Foster. 

Towards the end of the fall term the speakers ar selected f 
the annual interstate debates. These with others who wish 
make a thoro study of the question chosen continue the study 
debating thru the winter term. 

COURSE TEN 
The Speaking Voice 

This course aims to lay the basis of a correct use of tl 
speaking voice. Individual and class drills and exercizes ar us. 
to secure flexibility, projection, volume, support, resonance, ai 
control of the tone. Especially designd to benefit the classroo 
voice. Fall term. Major. 

Text: The Speaking Voice, Everts. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

The Analysis and Presentation op the Drama 

This course will present the drama as a living agent and 1 
analysis and presentation make vivid examples of ancient ai 
nyodern drama. The dramatic work of the school will grow o 
of this course and students entering it must hav taken oth> 
courses designated by the instructors. After an understandn 
of the technique of the drama and its analysis the class will stu( 
the senior play. Major. Winter term. 

COURSE TWELV 
Advanst Public Speaking 

A course for those who hav taken extemporaneous speakin 
The various kinds of speeches ar considerd, such as lectur 
after-dinner speech, institute talk, commencement address, pc 
litical speech, dedicatory address. The basis of the work is tt 
larger speech on the more formal occasion than the exteir. 
poraneous speech demands. Spring term. Major. 

Text: The Art of Public Speaking, Esenwein and Carnagey 



eeta 



Illinois State Normal University 101 

LATIN 

Two forms of the undergraduate curriculum in Latin ar 
alsjfferd: The first of four credits for students who hav alredy 
ompleted three years' work in Latin, the other of ten credits 
or beginners. 

Seven advanst courses (Courses 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17) 
ir offerd, all of which may be counted towards a degree. 

Graduates of approved high schools, if they hav three or four 
'ears' Latin, may substitute the four courses in method outlined 
ielow and any two advanst courses for credits in their regular 
ourse, as may be directed. 

Students in the longer programs may substitute Latin for 
itard subjects as shown in the programs on pp. 24, 25, 26. 

Beginners ar advized not to take up the study of Latin unless 
ihey propose to complete at least two years' work. 

For the first year's work in the courses for beginners one 
'^^ redit is allowd, for the second year's work two credits. 



THE FULL LATIN CURRICULUM 

The entire curriculum as provided for beginners consists of 
en terms, numberd consecutivly as follows: 

Courses one, two, and three, D'Ooge's First Latin Book. 

Courses four and five, Selections from Greenough, D'Ooge 
^nd Daniel's Junior Latin Book, Bennett's Latin Grammar. 

Courses six and seven, Cicero's Orations, D'Ooge. 

Course eight, Ovid, Kelsey. 

Courses nine and ten, Vergil's Aeneid, Frieze. 

In aim, content and method these courses ar similar to the 
atin Method Courses described on the next page. 



LATIN METHOD COURSES 

COURSE ONE 

Method of Beginning (First Year) Latin 

Prerequisit: An academic knowledge of the usual first 
(rear's work. A re-examination of Latin grammar, the serch 
>eing in the main one for unity and harmony. Comparativ view 

® 3f the declensions and conjugations and correlation of fonetic 
Bhanges with fenomena that the pupil is acquainted with. Physi- 

^ Dlogical explanation of fonetic changes. Introductory study of 
syntax, or of how Latin expresses the mam types of relations. 
The question is askt at every step: What is the English (or the 
German) way of expressing the same relation? Roman pronun- 
siation, with special care for the long vowels. Bennett's Teaching 
of Latin. Appendix of Bennett's Grammar. Fall term. Major. 



102 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE TWO 
Caesar and Cicero Method 

The first six weeks of this course ar an inductiv study oi 
the Latin ways of expressing those relations that offer to beginners 
the most difficulty, the collection of all examples in Caesar ol 
these constructions, and the examination of different authorities. 
Thus ar studied cwm-clauses, the gerund and gerundiv, the uses 
of the dativ, etc. 

The second six weeks' study is based upon Cicero's orations. 
It is insisted that the translation be worthy of the Latin original 
and that it be given in the class as it should be in the reading 
class. The Cicero class that is not a good rhetoric class and 
good reading class is not a good Cicero class. Winter term. Major. 



COURSE THREE 
Latin -English Etymology 

The work will be of an advanst character, but only two years 
of Latin ar required as a prerequisit. It may be taken for its 
cultural value by those who ar not specializing in Latin. 

This course is expected to give the student a much more last- 
ing and comprehensiv view of both the cognate and the lineal 
relationship of Latin and English than can be given incidentally 
in connection with the other Latin courses. It should be taken 
by all who expect to teach Latin. Spring term. Major. 

COURSE FOUR 

Method in Vergil and Ovid 

Careful translation of the text and study of scansion. Much 
attention is given to mythology and to the literary and the arch- 
eological fase of the work. Fall term. Major. 

Students who take the Latin Method Courses above should 
take also two of the following courses : 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Advanst Reading. Livy. — Prerequisits : Courses 1-4 above, 
or four years of high-school Latin. 

Comparativ syntax of Livy and Caesar. Discussion of sec- 
ondary school problems that pertain to Latin. Taught in the 
winter of the school year of 1917-18. Text: Lord. Major. 
COURSE TWELV 

Advanst Reading. Horace. — Prerequisit: Course H or 13. 
Taught in the spring of 1918. Text: Smith. Major. 



1 



I 






. course alternates, as to the years it is taught, with Course 11 
'Sisiii iPrerequisit: Courses 1-4 or four years of high-school Latin 
'^sarjTaught in the winter term of the school year 1918-19. Major. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 



Illinois State Normal University 103 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Advanst Reading. Tacitus, Germania and Ag vie ola.— This 



readi 



for 

re la 
ilim 
leot^ 
e 



Advanst Reading. Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia.— 
Tatiffl iThis course alternates as to the year it is given with Course 12. 
origii 'Spring of 1919. Prerequisit: either Course 11 or Course 17. Major. 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
Advanst Course in Writing Latin.— K preliminary review of 
elementary work, followd by the writing of connected discourse 
more difficult in character. Fall term every year. Major. 

% GERMAN 

I First Year's Work 

Courses 1, 2 and 3, taught successivly each fall, winter, and 
spring term, constitute the first year's work in German. They 
include grammatical drill, composition, some practis in conversa- 
tion, an elementary view of English-German philology, and the 
translation into English of 375 pages of German, including one 
classical drama. These three courses, or two years' of high-school 
work, ar a prerequisit to any of the advanst courses 4-9. 

COURSE ONE 
Elementary course; pronunciation, grammar, and easy read- 
ing. Mezger and Mueller's Kreuz und Iner durch Deutsche Lande, 
Storm's Immensee (Purin). Fall term. Major. 

COURSE TWO 
Grammar, syntax, and reading of modern prose. Memorizing 
of prose and verse. Kreuz und Iner durch Deutsche Lande. 
Storm's Immensee, and his In St. Jurgen. German Poems for 
Memorizing. Winter term. Major. 

. ■ COURSE THREE 

iod Translation into German, grammatical drill, dictation, trans- 

lation into English of Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, memorizing of 
lyrics and ballads. Clayton's Material for Oral Translation. Spring 
term. Major. 



gboi 



^OA Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

TEACHERS COLLEGE COURSES 

Prerequisits : Courses 1, 2, and 3, or two years of high-schoo 
work. 

Students wishing a recommendation as to their ability to teacl 
German should take at least three of the courses 4-9, arranging U 
substitute the same for subjects regularly in their programs. 

Students seeking a degree and selecting German as a prin- 
cipal subject, should take all the courses 4-9. 

Courses 2-9 include a thoro study of German grammar 
Joynes-Meissner, Parts I, II, and III. They include constani 
practis in conversation and composition in connection with gram- 
matical studies and the memorizing of German idioms, thri 
freie Reproduction and thru epitomes of, and composition exer- 
cizes based upon, the texts red. As the course progresses Germai 
becomes increasingly the language of the classroom. Much mon 
attention than is usually the case is given to English-Germar 
philology. During each year of advanst work, there will be £ 
thoro discussion of the aims, methods, and courses of high-schoo, 
German. 

COURSE FOUR 

Frey tag's Die Journalisten, Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm 
Hatfield's Lyrics and Ballads, Arnold's Fritz auf Ferien. Fall term; 
Major. 

COURSE FIVE \ 

A study of the life and works of Schiller. Die Jungfrau von 
Orleans and Marie Stuart. Winter term. Major. 

COURSE SIX 

A study of the life and w^orks of Goethe. His Egmont, hil 
Hermann und Dorothea, and many of his lyrics will be red. Spring 
term. Major. 

COURSE SEVEN • 

Freytag's Soil und Haben, and Eichendorff's Der Taugenichtsi 
Leon's Deutsche Grammatik. Study of the idioms of recent and 
contemporary German prose. Fall term. Major. 



COURSE EIGHT 

Ludwig's Zwischen Eimmel und Erde. Heine's Die Hartzreise 
and some of his lyrics will be red. Winter term. Suderman's 
Frau Sorge is to be red outside of class. Major. 






COURSE NINE 



Goethe's Iphigenie auf Tauris; Gore's German Science Reader; 
Goethe's Dichtung und Wahrheit to be red outside and reported 
to class. Major. 



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Illinois State Normal University 105 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

COURSE ONE 

For Beginners 
Songs lernd thru imitation. The elements of music, ear 
mcepts, deduced from the familiar songs. 

Notation, eye concepts, as it pictures the familiar musical 
lements. Sight-reading. Key and mesure signatures, and all 
Jrjmii |)rms of notation necessary to the intelligent reading of vocal 
WDslBiusic. 

Text : Elements of Music in Song, Westhoff. Minor. 

COURSE TWO 



iiigrs 
on 

icb 

•6en 

m 

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Elements of Musical Notation 

Sight-reading in unison, and two, three, and four-part 
armony. Practis in chorus singing. A study of all ordinary 
esure forms. Written work as a further means for ear and eye 
[•aining. 

Text : Elements of Music in Song, Westhoif . Songs for Sight 
inging, Series One. Minor. All terms. 

COURSE THREE 

Advanst Sight Reading 

This course is for students who hav fmisht Course 2 or its 
Iquivalent, and who intend to teach in intermediate or grammar 
ades. 
The major, minor, and chromatic scales; intervals and chords; 
aodulation and key relationship. 

Texts: Progressiv Music Series, Book Four. Songs for Sight 
mli,^inging, Series Three. Minor. All terms. 

Si course four 

Primary Music Methods 

The complete song as a basis for the child's music education. 
Selecting songs: (a) with reference to their use; (b) with ref- 
rence to the child voice. How to teach a rote song . Develop- 
Qent and care of the child voice. The monotone. Observation 
f the simpler elements of song. Notation of familiar melodies, 
leading simple melodies. Written work. Fall and winter terms. 

Practis teaching in the Model School. Prerequisit, Music 2. 

Texts: Progressiv Music Series, Books One and Two. Minor. 



106 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FIVE 
Music Methods in the Grammar School 

This course covers the work for grades four to eight inclusiv. 
Prerequisit: Course three. 

Classification of the elements of music and the presentation 
of their parts in logical succession. The problems involvd in the 
art of reading vocal music, considerd from the teacher's point 
of view. Tone production, and classification of voices in the 
upper grades. Song interpretation. Fall term. 

Practis teaching in the Model School. 

Text: Progressiv Music Series, Book Three. Major. 

COURSE SIX 
High School Music 

Bibliography of high-school music. Chorus conducting. Or- 
ganization of an orchestra; glee clubs. A study of the lives and 
works of the great composers. Winter term. 

Practis teaching. Prerequisit: Courses 2 and 3. Major. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Elementary Harmony 

Musical History. Music Appreciation. Form in Music. Pre- 
requisit: Courses 2 and 3. Major. Spring term. 

The Choral Club 

The Choral Club — a chorus of mixt voices — meets twice each; 
week. Composition of the better class and excerpts from the; 
standard cantatas, operas, and oratorios ar studied and prepared, 
for public presentation. Three concerts ar given each year. ; 

The Glee Clubs 

Practis in part singing may be further developt in connec--^ 
tion with the work of the Girls' and Boys' Glee Clubs, which meet' 
twice a week for practis. 

The Orchestra ■* 

Students who play upon orchestral instruments ar given an 
opportunity for practis in concerted playing. The orchestra 
holds one rehersal each week. 

The Band f 

The Normal University owns fifteen instruments, upon which 
regular lessons ar given until sufficient skill is gaind for concerted 
playing. The band and orchestra furnish music for the social 
functions of the school. 



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Illinois State Normal University 107 



ARTS AND GRAFTS 



There is a growing demand for teachers who can introduce 
elementary instruction into the public schools of the state. In 
many respects this school affords excellent facilities for the 
training of special teachers. The kindred arts ar being rapidly 
developt with the best equipment. The professional studies of 
the normal school enable the students of art to lern the proper 
He setting of art courses in the public-school curriculum. 

All students in the special program of Art and Design will leave 
for the use of the institution at least one example of their work 
in sketching, painting, etc., and one of their work in the crafts. 

COURSE ONE 
Freehand Drawing 
This course treats simply of the technique of drawing as a 
language. There is little effort to touch the art element. 

The scope, function, divisions and kinds of drawing, fore- 
shortening and convergence, and light and shade ar the subjects. 
More extensiv treatments of these subjects ar offerd in courses 

four and five. , ■ ^ x 

It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected to 
supplement this course. Minor. All terms. 

COURSE TWO 

Primary Teachers' Course 

There ar two parts; one that considers the subject for the 
children and the other for the teacher. 

Suggestion in regard to illustrativ drawing, clay modeling, 
elementary object and nature drawing make up the first part. 

The second part includes effectiv blackboard drawing, study 
of the pose, picture study for the lower grades, and the elements 
of the three branches of form study: construction, appearance 

and design. , * ^ * 

It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected to 
supplement this course. Minor. Fall and spring. 

COURSE THREE 
Drawing for Rural Schools 
Study of objects in mass drawing that ar interesting in color 
and shape. 



c. P[ 



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108 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Simple suggestions in regard to convergence and foreshort- 
ening in the appearance of objects. 

Flowers, sprays, fruits, vegetables, trees, animals in charac- 
teristic pose, and simple landscapes ar selected with a hope of 
adding to the pupil's appreciation of the beauty in the things 
about him. 

It is recommended that courses seven and ten be elected to 
supplement this course. Minor. Fall and winter. 

COURSE FOUR 
Freehand Perspegtiv 

This course is introduced by a discussion of the scope, func- 
tion, divisions, and kinds of drawing, which leads to the problem 
of convergence and foreshortening. 

Chief problems: Curvd-edge objects:— Three views of the 
circle, concentric circles. Straight-edge objects: nine typical 
positions of an object as to the observer. Study of parallel reced- 
ing edges and foreshortend faces. The problems ar studies made 
from local conditions and may be reset to the opportunities 
of any other school. Major. Two hours daily. Fall term 

COURSE FIVE 
Light and Shade 

Training in light and shade is a fundamental element in tl 
appreciation of the beauty in objects. 

This course begins with the study of two faces of an object 
in flat values. Later there is a consideration of three faces, 
curvd faces, shadows, reflected lights, composition in two and 
three tones, translation of color. The last part of the course ap- .] 
plies some of the principles discoverd in the foregoing to black- | 
board illustrativ sketching. Minor. Winter term. 

COURSE SIX 
Cast Drawing 

This is advanst work in light and shade for students in the 
special art and design course, intended to develop the skill nec- 
essary for a supervizor of drawing. 

Casts of hands, beds and the antique ar used in developing 
the principles of foreshortening. Major. Two hours daily. Winter 
term. Prerequisit: Light and Shade. 



Illinois State Normal University 



109 



COURSE SEVEN 
Color 
Color-knowledge and color-training ar essential to good taste 
the use of color. The use of color has much to do with the 
iise of the nervous system. 

The course considers the spectrum, tints, shades, tones and 
(tensities, color characteristics and a theory of color harmony. 
imple nature studies ar used. Plants, sprays, fruits, vegetables 
iid nearby views. Minor. Fall and spring terms. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Color Pragtis 

This is a continuation of course seven, for students in art and 

Ijsign. It includes advanst work in water color and colord crayon. 

lowers, fruits, and landscapes ar studied with special reference 

high-school teaching and supervizing. Major. Two hours 

[lily. Spring term. Prerequisit: Color. 

COURSE NINE 

Oil Painting 

This course is a study of picture-making: how to paint, whaf 

represent, and how to organize a picture. Essential points ar 

Irangement of lines, spaces, tones and values. Points in this? 

mrse ar similar to those in rhetoric, in language and harmony in; 

kusic. Study of the works of master artists in regard to points 

composition is an important means to the end. Most of the 

[•oblems ar workt out first in a simply dry medium (charcoal). 

later oil paints ar used. While skil with any medium cannot be 

lind in a short time, the important side of this course can be 

^)preciated by any faithful student who may be admitted to the 

livanst courses. Much of the work is done on the campus which 

fords excellent subjects for this study. Major. Two hours daily. 

Ipring term. Prerequisit: Color. 

COURSE TEN 
Art Appreciation 

This course consists of a careful understanding of art, archi- 
jcture, and sculpture by including a brief outline of the history 
ff art as presented by painters from the Renaissance period thru 
f|he modern schools. 
J! The Illinois Picture-Study course is carefully discust. 

The architecture of the Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, 
|iaracenic, and Gothic schools is carefully analyzed and reviewd. 

The school is well supplied with a good reference library, 
lictures, lantern slides, casts, and other collections. 

Texts : DeGarmo's Art Appreciation, and Van Dyke's History 
i Art. Major. Winter term. 



I 



*^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE ELEVEN 
Art Organization 
The topics: 

The relativ importance of different branches of public-schoo' 
art and their relation to each other; the aims and standardi 
aJI successful work; tentativ plans and courses of study; studj 
-^of proposed standard courses; the opportunities of the art teachei 
::aside from her technical work. Local schools ar visited so thai 
maihods of instruction may be observd. Major. Spring term. 

COURSE TWELV 

Principles of Design 

A study of composition developing the principles of arrange- 
ment in line, dark and light, and color thru exercizes and class 
projects, as well as discussion of good design in the larger fields 
of painting, architecture, costume, the house and various crafts. 
Design is made a living subject— the effort being to develop strong 
appreciation for beauty and some ability to execute. Minor. Fall 
and winter terms. 

COURSE THIRTEEN 
Primary Handwork 

A course arranged on the basis of materials used in the ele- 
mentary grades to giv opportunity for expression in constructioij 
work. ; 

The course includes practical work, compilation of illustrativ 
material and reference notes, book reviews and observations in the 
elementary grades. The course is arranged primarily for teachers 
of intermediate grades and supervizors. One hour per day. Minor. 
All terms. 

COURSE FOURTEEN 

Art Metal 

Copper and silver ar the metals used in this course. Problems 
suitable for intermediate grades and high-school classes ar made, 
using the following processes: etching, saw piercing, soldering, 
riveting, repousse, and simple work in enameling. In working 
with silver, simple jewelry making, including the setting of gems, 
is taught. 

While a sequence of practical problems is arranged for the 
students in order that all processes may be lernd, these ar so ar- 
ranged as to offer much opportunity for individuality. Major. 
Two hours daily. Fall term. Prerequisit: Design. 



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Illinois State Normal University ill 

COURSE FIFTEEN 
Pottery 
Clay to the craftsmaa one of the most interesting materials, 
the basic material for pottery problems made by modelmg, flat 
lid round coil bilding, and thru the use of the wheel and molds. 
':he decoration of pottery is done by incise lines and areas, clay 
iercing, relief modeling, glazing and inlay. ^ . ^ , 

In addition to the series of hilt pottery problems the students 
1 this course lern mold making, how to mix and apply both gloss 
ad matt glazes, the construction of kilns, and obtain experience 

,1 firing a muffle kiln. . ^^-^ 

Major. Two hours daily. Winter term. Prerequisit: Design. 

COURSE SIXTEEN 



I 



Bookbinding 
This course is not a highly technical one, but deals with prob- 
jms in cardboard construction and bookbinding for the grades and 
igh school. Interesting exercizes in booklet making, book re- 
airing, and rebinding form the main part of the course. Related 
Material such as the study and observation of commercial methods 
! f bookbinding, paper manufacture, and printing ar also an im- 
portant part of the work. Minor. One hour daily. Spring term. 



COURSE SEVENTEEN 
Home Decoration 
"The art training which belongs in the elementary school is 



^hat training which makes for a better appreciation of esthetic 
jtandards and which finds expression in making things more 
Measing than they otherwise would be." James E. Russell, Dean, 
Teachers College. 

It is this spirit which helps create such courses as Costume 
Design and Home Decoration. It is here that we especially study 
\rt principles in terms of things about us. The course in Home 
PwM becoration includes a study of the construction of the home and 
its furnisht details from the standpoint of the designers. Ref- 
erence work, practical color plates and the compiling of illustrativ 
aterials occupy the two hours a day for six weeks. 
Minor. Fall term. 

dfif 



112 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE EIGHTEEN 
Costume Design 
Design principles and color theory ar here studied in terms 
of dress. The course includes practical problems in representation 
costume drapmg in cloth or paper, collecting and classifying dress 
m order to create an enthusiasm for proper and artistic dressing 
Mmor— six weeks only— two hours daily. Fall term. 

COURSE NINETEEN 

Industrial Art 

Principles of design ar here studied in concrete form. The 
practical problems workt out wil be especially suitable for the up- 
per grades and high school. The purpose of this work in the 
schoolroom is to meet the usual aims of handwork, and to bring 
the student into conscious relationship with his environment 
Major. Two hours daily. Winter term. Prerequisit: Design. 

COURSE TWENTY 
Commercial Design 
This course, tho intended primarily lor special Art and Design, 
students, is of high value to Commercial students in connection* 
with their studies in advertizing. Methods of reproducing andi 
printing posters ar explaid. Minor. One hour daily. Spring', 
term. Prerequisit: Color and Design. , 

COURSE TWENTY-ONE ; 

Blackboard Drawing 

This course is oflferd that teachers may acquire skil in black-' 
board technique. White and colored crayons ar used. Many of- 
the exercizes ar taken from school problems. This course is re-i 
quired of special students in drawing, and is of great value to- 
those expecting to teach in the primary grades. Minor. One hour' 
daily. Spring term. Prerequisit: Drawing One or its equivalent 

MANUAL TRAINING 

The contribution of manual training to a complete and 
rounded education is now generally recognized, and the number 
of schools where it is given a place in the program is constantly 
increasing. The demand for teachers who can conduct the work 
continues to be far in excess of the supply. 

It is the intention to place special emfasis upon those forms 
of manual training that ar practicable under ordinary conditions 
in Illinois with reasonable expenditures for equipment and ma- 
terials, and to giv comparativly little attention to those lines 
of work which ar impracticable by reason of the great expense 
involvd. 



Illinois State Normal University 113 

COURSE ONE 

Benchwork in WCX)D 
The aim of this course is to teach the important tool opera- 



tions used in woodworking. It is arranged to prepare teachers 
^irho wish to teach benchwork in the upper grammar grades and 
dgh school. The work as outlined can be taught in any school 
hat has an equipment of benches and hand tools. The students 
oake a number of useful articles which illustrate various tool 
jrocesses. The sharpening of tools and a study of materials used 
n woodworking will receiv due attention. Class demonstrations 
•ffi. ^nd shop-talks will be given at each new stage in the work. 
thei No credit will be given towards graduation for less than 120 

i ia lOurs' work. Students taking the special manual training course 
aust complete 240 hours' work. 

Texts: Workshop Note Book, Greene; Handwork in Wood, 
"Joyes. 

COURSE TWO 

Wood-Turning and Pattern -Making 
^^^ The fundamental tool processes used by the wood-turner will 
^^•^ taught by demonstration and practis at the lathe. 

A number of problems in spindle turning, cylinder turning, 
leads, fillets, cones, concave and compound curvs, etc., will be 
equired before taking up face-plate work and pattern-making 
j^hich will follow. A number of patterns will be made which 
|irll illustrate important principles, such as draft, cores, fillets, 
shrinkage, partings, etc. 

Prerequisit, Course One. 

COURSE THREE 
Furniture Construction, Using Woodworking Machinery 

The use of woodworking machinery by advanst students in 
nanual training tends to make the work far more vocational, and 
?ivs a training on various machines that is hard to get in a com- 
nercial shop, where the workmen lern to work on only one or 
.wo machines. Students will be taught to use the circular and 
Dand saws, and jointer, the surfacer, the mortis machine and the 
;rimmer, and to perform the hand tool work necessary for fitting 
md assembling. 

Factory methods, in which the same process is repeated till 
3kil and speed ar acquired, ar followd to a large extent where 
JBveral articles of the same kind ar wanted. 

The various methods of wood-finishing receiv considerable 
ittention. 

Prerequisit, Course One. 

COURSE FOUR 

Elementary Woodwork and Carpentry 

The purpose of this course is the laying out of a course of 

study for the fifth and sixth grades, with a group of models for 

Bftch grade, suitable for any school, no matter how small the 



114 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

equipment. Lectures ar given on the various fases of the work, 
and each student makes a course of study and a list of models. 
These ar made as original as possible. A part of the time is 
given to bench work on the models above mentiond, and to model 
lessons in teaching manual training in these grades. 

Instruction is given in the care and use of tools, the selection 
of the equipment, and devises for introducing the course with 
limited equipment. 

The second half of this course is designd for preparing 
teachers to teach the fundamental principles of carpentry in the 
upper grades and high school. 

COURSE FIYE 

Organization of Manual Training 
This course is pland for persons who wish to teach manual 
training. Lesson plans, equipments and courses of study ar pre- 
pared by the students. Class demonstrations and the various 
methods of presenting a lesson ar considerd. 

In order that the student may become familiar with the lit- 
erature of manual training, the philosofy, psychology, and peda- 
gogy of manual training ar discust, and library reading and theme 
writing ar required. 

Prerequisit: Course 1. Fall term. Major. 

COURSE SIX 
Mechanical Drawing 

This is a course for beginners and includes working draw- 
ings, lettering, geometrical drawing, problems in projection, in- 
tersections of solids, development of surfaces, tracing and blue 
printing, and a few drawings in isometric projection. The im- 
portant principles in the theory of drawing ar taught, and much i 
attention given to neat ink work, using the drafting conventions 
usually employd in the best drafting rooms. 

Students may furnish their own instruments, or rent them .• 
from the department. Bennett's Problems in Mechanical Drawing 
is used as a text. Two hours a day for 24 weeks, 2 credits. Taught 
every term. This course is required of all students taking the 
special manual training course. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Machine Drawing 
The special conventions of machine drawing, sketching, de- 
tailing, assembling, etc., ar presented to the student in this 
course. Machine details, such as screws, bolts, etc., ar drawn to 
Illustrate the technical conventions used by draftsmen in making 
such drawings. Free-hand sketches of machine parts ar made 
on platted paper and later machine details and assembled drawings 
ar made with the drafting instruments from the sketches. Some 
of the important parts of a gasoline engin ar drawn, and the 
strength and proportions of the part ar criticized from standard 
formulas workt out by engineers who hav made a special study 
of gasoline engin designs. 



Illinois State Normal University 115 

This is an advanst course for students who wish to be pre- 
)ared to teach mechanical drawing in high schools. 

Two hours per day for twelv weeks. One credit. 

Prerequisit: Mechanical Drawing. 

Text: Mechanical Drawing for High Schools, Sloan, Evans, 
ind Zimmerman. 

COURSE EIGHT 
Architectural Drawing 

Architectural letters, conventions, details, sections, study of 
materials, specifications and mechanical perspectiv ar taught in 
m elementary way as drawing the complete plans of a small two- 
story frame house designd by the pupil. 

Prerequisit: Course 6. 

Two hours per day for twelv weeks. One credit. 

Text: Mechanical Drawing for High Schools. Sloan, Evans, 
and Zimmerman. 

COURSE NINE 

History of Manual Training (Minor) 

This course follows the efforts of the educational reformers 
in Europe in introducing the manual arts into the schools. The 
theories and practises of Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, von 
Fellenberg and others ar reviewd, followd by a study of the more 
successful work in modern times of Cygnaeus, Salomon, and Delia 
Vos. 

The history of the manual arts in the United States and the 
development by the various movements which hav produced edu- 
cational and vocational courses will be followd carefully. Lectures, 
reading and written work. 

Winter term. 

COURSE TEN 
Furniture Designing and Construction 

Manual training in its best form is now to a large extent 
applied design. Craftsman furniture with pleasing lines, spaces, 
and attractiv proportions will be designd and some of the articles 
constructed and finisht in soft artistic shades. A brief study 
of the various types of furniture will be made. 

Library reading on design, cabinet construction, and tool use 
will be required. 

Text: Furniture Design, Crawshaw. 

Prerequisit: Course 1. (Spring term only.) 



116 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



HOME ECONOMICS 




HOUSEHOLD ART 

It is the purpose of this department to provide for the ade- 
quate training of teachers of Household Art. During the second 
year, students ar required to do practis teaching in the training 
school. 

Courses 1, 2, 3, and 6 may be taken as electivs by students in 
other departments. 

Materials ar furnisht by students for all courses except Course 
6, for which a fee of two dollars is charged. 

COURSE ONE 
Needlework 

This course includes work in hand sewing, darning, mending, 
crocheting, knitting, applied to problems suitable for elementary 
and high-school classes. It also includes an analysis of ornamental 
stitches and their application to a piece of simple embroidery. 

A study is made of real laces and of historic types of em- 
broidery. 

Text: Fall term. 

COURSE TWO 
Garment Making 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of con- 
struction. It givs practis in fundamental stitches, in handsewing, 
in the use of the sewing machine, in the drafting of patterns, and 
in the planning, cutting, fitting, and finishing of simple garments. 

Problems in design, textils, and economics ar considerd in 
connection with the technical work. 

Winter, spring, and both summer terms. Major. 

Text: Clothing for Women, Baldt. 

COURSE THREE 

Dressmaking 

This course givs practis in drafting and modeling patterns, in 
the use of commercial patterns, in the cutting, fitting and finishing 
of a shirt waist, a tailord cotton skirt, and a somewhat elaborate 
linen or cotton dress. Problems in design, textils, and economics ar 
considerd in connection with this technical work. 

Prerequisit: Course II or its equivalent. Spring and first 
summer term. 



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Illinois State Normal University 117 

COURSE FOUR 
Advanst Dressmaking 
This course givs extended practis in modeling and draping, 
[includes the making of a tailord woolen skirt and a crepe or 
fon waist and a silk gown, with special stress upon the proper 
idling and finishing of these different materials. 

Problems in design, textils, and economics ar considerd in 
mection with this technical work. 
Prerequisit: Course III. Fall term. 

COURSE FIVE 
The Theory of Household Art 

This course brings together the subject-matter in construction 
tches, textils, design, and economics, and organizes it as the 
jis for the selection of suitable problems to present to classes 
elementary and high schools. Fundamental principles of teach- 
f ar applied to lessons in household art. Comparison of courses 
study in different schools under varying conditions of equip - 
int and management ar made. 

Prerequisit: Two courses in Education, three courses in 
usehold Art. Winter term. 



COURSE SIX 
Millinery 

This course includes the simple processes in millinery, making 
d trimming, renovating, and remodeling hats and a study of the 
iterial used. 

Spring term. 

COURSE SEVEN (Electiv) 

Textils 

A study of fabrics from the standpoint of the consumer. It 
nuMsludes the study of fibers, yarn structures, weavs, and finish- 
[ffln^fg. and of simple physical and chemical tests for the identifica- 
n of mixtures and adulterations — the work to form the basis for 
e selection of clothing and house furnishing. 
Fall term. Woolman's Textils. Major. 

COURSE EIGHT 

Rural School Course 

This course has for its aim the presentation of such work as 
be accomplisht in rural schools: — crocheting, knitting, hand 

jJijjjMid machine sewing, darning and mending, and the planning, cut- 

ijjKK ig, fitting, and finishing of simple garments, including a linen or 

^ Qgham dress. 

The time and place for sewing in the country schools will be 

.»cust. Winter terra. 



118 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The courses in Household Science ar pland to cover the 
terms of two regular school years and one summer term. 

They ar designd for high-school graduates, and the cor . 
lated studies required ar those considerd necessary to the pre- 
aration of a teacher of Household Science in the public schools. 

Courses 1, 2, and 3 in Household Science ar open to regur 
students who wish to take up the work as an electiv without p . 
suing all the correlated studies. Classes in Household Science r 
limited to eighteen members. Students ar registerd in order f 
application. 

Materials used by students ar charged at cost. 

COURSE ONE (Fall Term) 

Cookery I. 

The first course of cookery is based on a study of Food Pr - 
ciples. The composition and dietetic value of food materials ii 
the processes of cookery best adapted to each class of foods e 
discust and each principle is illustrated by the preparation of si- 
ple dishes. The practical work is designd to acquaint the stud t 
with all the fundamental processes of cookery and the most - 
tractiv methods of serving. At the same time the sources, histc , 
manufacture, and cost of each food is considerd. Daily, t) 
periods each day. 



COURSE TWO (Winter Term) 
Cookery II. Household Management I. 



I 



The second course in cookery provides instruction and prac: 
of an advanst character and a wider application of the princips 
studied in the first course. Open to all who hav completed Cou3 
I in Cookery. Three lessons per week, two periods each. 

The first course in household management is a systemcJ 
study of the duties of the housekeeper, embracing the foundatJ , 
administration, and maintenance of the home. Lectures in sa- 
tation, household accounts, and domestic servis ar included i 
this course. Two lessons per week, double periods. 



I 



COURSE THREE (Spring Term) 

Cookery III. Household Management II. 

The third course in cookery is a continuation of the wc: 
given in the first and second courses. It deals with the plannij 
and preparation of menus, the choice and arrangement of appi- 
priate garnishing and correct methods of servis. Simple and ]• 
expensiv meals ar pland to meet the requirements of a standi 
dietary and a number of these meals ar prepared and servd by tJ 
students. 



Illinois State Normal University 119 

The second course in household management is devoted to the 
dy of marketing, serving, and laundry work. 
%! 1 The course in marketing deals with the source, quality, price, 
m. ii uses of foodstuffs and takes up a study of the Pure Food Laws 
i iki *1 Requirements. Visits to markets ar made. 
to tie ! The laundry work is based on a study of the scientific prin- 
iCMlioi lies involvd in the softening of water, the preparation and ac- 
iiitoii n of soap and other clensing agents, and the methods of hand- 
^'M g the various fabrics in order to remove stains, disinfect and 
dScia nse garments, and restore the natural finishes by the different 
inKj ithods of drying and ironing. The subjects ar arranged in a 
lies of practical lessons according to the nature of the processes, 
sd the work is carried on in a well-equipt laundry. 

Course III is open to all who hav completed Courses I and II 
i Cookery, and Course I in Household Management. 
Daily, two periods per day. 
Text: Food Products, by Henry C. Sherman. 

COURSE FOUR (Fall Term) 
Cookery IV. 
Institutional Cookery, Preservation of Food 
The, first part of this course is devoted to the canning and 
eserving of fruits and vegetables and the making of jellies, 
i The institutional work combines the skill in cookery, acquired 
|ring the earlier courses, with the knowledge of correct methods 
( serving, practist in the serving course; and carries out, in 
jaotical manner, the planning of menus and serving of meals. 
he students acquire skill in handling large quantities of material, 
knowledge of correct combinations, cost of materials, time of 
•eparation for meals and labor involvd in serving a large number 
■ people. 

Daily, two periods per day. 

Open to all who hav completed Courses I, II, and III in Cook- 
■y, and Course II in Household Management. 

COURSE FIVE (Winter Term) 
Cookery V. 



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Care and Feeding of infants and children, invalid cookery, 

OME nursing, ADVANST COOKERY. 

The care and feeding of infants and children includes a study 
f the physical development of the child during the first few 
lonths of its life, artificial feeding, with special attention to the 
ireparation of modified milk according to standard formulas, the 
Blection of clothing and the general care which leads to the 
Drmatiion of correct habits. Sample diets and typical meals ar 
repared for children of different ages. 



120 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The course in home nursing is pland to enable one to rende 
intelligent assistance in the sick-room. The topics coverd a 
furnishing, warming, and ventilating the sick-room; making th 
bed, bathing and dressing the patient; administering food ani 
medicin; lifting and care of helpless patients; prepartion and ap 
pliance of poultices; bandaging; emergencies an& diet in disease 

Invalid cookery as taught includes the preparation of fooi 
for the sick room, special stress being laid upon the digestibilit; 
and nutritiv value of food, and dainty and attractiv servis. Specia 
diets for various pathological conditions ar also considerd. 

The dishes prepared in advanst cookery ar of a more elaborat 
and complicated nature than those taken up in the earlier courses 
and more formal servis is studied. 

Open to all who hav completed Courses I, II, III, and IV ii 
Cookery and Courses I and II in Household Management. 

Two periods daily. Major. 

Text: The Rome Nurse's Handbook of Practical Nursing, b; 
Charlotte A. Aikens. 

COURSE SIX (Spring Term) 

Dietetics and Nutrition, Organization of Household Science 

Principles, Demonstrations 

The study of dietetics and nutrition involvs consideration o 
the nutritiv value, digestibility, and cost of food, the balanst ration 
combinations of foods suitable for workers, old persons, childre; 
and invalids, and economical dietaries. 

The course in household science principles embraces a stud; 
of the meaning and history of the household science movement 
equipments, courses and methods of study, and the qualification 
necessary in a teacher of household science. 

A portion of the term is given up to demonstrations in cooker; 
in which methods of teaching household science by demonstratioi 
and lecture ar studied and practist. 

Course VI is open to those who hav completed all previou 
courses in Cookery and Household Management. 

Two periods daily. Major. 

Texts: A Laboratory Hand-book of Dietetics, by Mary Swart: 
Rose, Chemistry of Food and Nutrition, by Henry C. Sherman. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Household Science for Country Teachers 

This is a special course of 120 hours in the study of foods 
marketing, cooking, and serving. An effort is made to adapt thi 
work to the needs of the country home, and to present methods o1 
class organization and suggestions for correlation that will be o) 
value to the country teacher. 

Winter term. 



Illinois State Normal University 121 




AGRICULTURE 



The four-year program in agriculture is designd for students 
ho wish to become teachers of agriculture in township high 
jhools, consolidated schools, village or city schoo]<s. In addition 
) giving the students a thoro course covering ttie entire field 
f scientific agriculture, it is well fortified with courses in physi- 
il and biological science. These courses form an excellent foun- 
ation for the study of scientific agriculture, and equip the student 
3r teaching two or more lines closely allied with each other. 

Students may take the first two years of the four-year pro- 
ram and secure the regular Normal-School Diploma, after which 
ley may either teach or take the remaining two years' work and 
3cure the degree of Bachelor of Education. Students ar urged 
3 finish the four-year program before attempting to teach, be- 
ause of the better training and greater possibilities which the 
raduate from the four-year program obtains. 

The Normal University owns and operates an excellent farm 
f about ninety acres, lying close to the campus. The sole pur- 
ose of this farm is to demonstrate good farming methods to the 
tudents taking the courses in agriculture. 

The farm is primarily a dairy farm, a feature which in- 
reases the activities of the farm and adds to the student's pos- 
ibilities of practis and observation. Pure-bred horses, cattle, 
wine, and poultry ar grown. 

The farm is equipt with a modern house, barn, and other 
arm bildings, and sufficient modern machinery for a farm of its 
ize. 

A five-field rotation is carried on, and a careful and thoro 
ystem of farm bookkeeping is followd, recording all data of costs 
md receipts. These records ar available to students in the course, 
inabling them to study scientific farming from the business point 
)f view. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— COURSE ONE 

Elementary Stock Judging 

A study of the history, character, and form of the horse, 
;ow, pig, and sheep. Emfasis is placed upon the market classes 
md grades of the various animals, upon their feeding qualities, 
ind upon their capacity for the production of milk, meat, wool, 
vork, and speed. Some time is given to the identification and 
jcoring of the various types of poultry. A study of the pedigrees 
4nd show-ring achievements of the various animals is made. 

Fall term. 

Text-book : Harper's Animal Husbandry for Schools. 



122 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— COURSE TWO 

Elementary Stock Feeding 
A study of the classes of food nutrients and their functit 
in the animal body. Digestion, absorption, and assimilation. l\ 
extent and nature of the demands for food for maintenanj, 
growth, fattening, milk, wool, and work. The principles invoi 
in the selection of rations. Choice of feeding stuffs and the co;, 
pounding of rations. 
Winter term. 
Text-book: Harper's Animal Husbandry for Schools. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— COURSE THREE 
Ad VAN ST Stock Feeding 

This course includes a study of the most successful and e' 
nomical methods of feeding horses, cattle, sheep, swine, ad 
poultry. Special emfasis is placed on the growth and develc- 
ment of the young animal, on feeding for the production of poi, 
milk, wool, and egs, and in the feeding of the horse for work, le 
work will be largely practical feeding tests carried on with animt 
on the University Farm, and a study of the results obtaind at 1e 
various experiment stations. 

Fall term. 

Text-book: Henry's Feeds and Feeding. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— COURSE FOUR 
Principles of Animal Breeding 

This course is a study of the history of the developmei 
the various breeds of domesticated animals, a study of the varic! 
herdbooks where the important families of each breed ar tracL 
The methods used by breeders in establishing desired charactt- 
istics. The scientific application of the laws of heredity, selectiii 
variation, atavism, etc. 

Spring term. 

Text-book : Davenport's Principles of Breeding, 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY— COURSE FIVE 

Animal Pathology ti 

A study of the detection, prevention, and treatment of disea^l 
of the farm animals. Hog cholera, tuberculosis, and abortion ^^l 
be treated more fully than other diseases of less importance to tJ 
farmer. 

Spring term. 

Text-books: Government and State Publications. 



jj Illinois State Normal University 123 

AGRONOMY— COURSE ONE 
Cereal and Forage Crops 
A study of the varieties of wheat, corn, oats, barley, and rye. 
le judging, grading, and storing of the cereals for seed or mar- 
_t. A study of the forage crops which demand the attention 
„1 the farmer in the autum months will be taken up. Alfalfa 
d silage will receiv considerable attention. 
Fall term. 
Text-book : Hunt's Cereals in America. 



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AGRONOMY— COURSE TWO 
Soil Physics 

A study of the formation and classification of soils; capillary, 
rgroscopic, and gravitational water; the effects of drainage and 
lor of soils on soil temperature; the granulation and puddling 
sons; the preparation of the seed bed and the proper tillage for 
e various crops. 

Winter term. 

Text-books: Lyon and Fippins' Soils, and Mosier and Gus- 
Ifson's Laboratory Manual for Soil Physics. 

AGRONOMY— COURSE THREE 
Crop Production 
This course includes a study of the methods of planting and 
iltivating the various cereal and forage crops. The treatment 
T insect, weed, and fungous enemies of the cereals and forage 
ants. Conservation of the water supply for cereal and forage 
ops. Curing and marketing of hay. 
Spring term. 
Text-book : Hunt's Cereals in America. 

AGRONOMY— COURSE FOUR 
Concrete Construction and Drainage 
This course includes a study of the making of concrete floors, 
alls, blocks, tile, posts, tanks, and troughs. Considerable time 
spent in the mixing and reinforcing of concrete. The work 
I surveying consists of the surveying of field, the location of fence 
nes, and the laying out of systems of tile drains. The work in 
irveying and drainage is largely field work. 
Fall term. 
Text-books : State and Government Bulletins. 

AGRONOMY— COURSE FIVE 
Farm Machinery 
A study of the various types of power and field machines for 
16 farm. The major part of the course will be devoted to a study 
f the gas and steam engin, and the more complex forms of field 
lachinery of the farm. 
Winter term. 

Text-book : Davidson and Chase's Farm Machines and Farm 
otors. 



124 Annual Catalog and Course of Study |^ 

AGRONOMY— COURSE SIX 

Soil Fertility 

This course is a study of the various types of crop rotation 

together with a study of the fertilizers necessary to maintain \i 

soil fertility. Considerable time is spent in growing pot culturd 

and in a study of the results obtaind on fertilizer plots i 

Fall term. 

Text-book: Hopkins's Soil Fertility and Permanent AgriciA 
ture. 

AGRONOMY— COURSE SEVEN 
Soil Fertility 

This course is a continuation of Agronomy Six. It consiii 
of a detaild study of the results obtaind in soil fertility te.K 
at the various state experiment stations. 

Winter term. 

Text-book: Hopkins's Soil Fertility and Permanent Agr- 
culture. 

AGRONOMY— COURSE EIGHT 
Farm Management 

A course in selecting the farm, planning the rotation, 1 
eating the fields, lots, and bildings, and keeping the farm a 
counts. In addition to the work as outlined above the stude. 
spends some time in acquainting himself with the various fori l 
of legal papers with which the farmer has to deal. 

Winter term. 

Text-book: Warren's Farm Management. 



HORTICULTURE— COURE ONE 
Orcharding and Gardening 



This course includes a study of graftage, cuttage, layerag 
pruning, and spraying. Some time is spent in laying out orchard 
selecting trees, planting trees, and cultivating the orchard aft< 
planting. The insect enemies of the tree, bush, and vine frui 
ar studied. In connection with the work in fruit culture a stuc 
of the hot-bed, and cold-frame is taken up. The planting of tl 
various plants follows the work with the hot-bed and cold-fram 
The insect enemies of the vegetables ar also studied. 

Spring term. 

Text-books : Bailey's Principles of Fruit Growing and Bail 
ay's Vegetable Gardening. 



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Illinois State Normal University 125 

Agriculture for Country Schools 1 

' This course is recommended to the students who ar preparmg 
) teach in the country schools and wish to do considerable work 
1 agriculture. It may be taken insted of the nature study pro- 
pam in Country School curriculums. The work wil be devoted 
) the study of beef and dairy cattle, horses, hogs, and sheep, 
roblems in milk testing, management of herds, management of 
oultry, and the care and feeding of animals wil be taken up. 
lajor. Fall term. Major credit in curriculums M and N. 
Text: Essentials of Agriculture, WdXQV^. 



Agriculture for Country Schools 2 

This course is recommended to those students who expect to 
3ach in country schools. It may be taken in lieu of the nature 
tudy program in the curriculums for country school teachers, 
he course consists of a study of farm crops with special refer- 
nce to their economic importance and their relation to the soil. 
he formation, classification, and management of soils wil also be 
aken up. Major. Spring term. 

Text : Essentials of Agriculture, Waters. 

HORTICULTURE— COURSE TWO 
Landscape Gardening 



A course in the arrangement, and planting of the trees, 
hrubs, and flowers necessary for the proper decoration of home 
md school grounds. The care of flowers, trees and shrubs in 
vinter and summer. The pruning of trees and shrubs. 

Spring term. 

Text-books: Government and State Bulletins. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 
Milk and Milk Products 

A course In the operation of the Babcock test, the testing of 
lerds, the detection of adulterated milk, and the testing of milk, 
pream, butter, or cheese for butter fat, acid, bacteria, and 
idulterants. 

Spring term. 
jjjj Text-book: Farringdon and Wolls' Testing of Milk and Its 

Products. 



m 



126 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



COUNTRY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT P 



a 



The purpose of this department is three-fold. 1. To pre 
pare teachers for country schools. 2. To assist country teacher 
activly engaged in teaching. 3. To help stimulate rural progress 
Two curriculums ar offerd thru the Country School Department 
a one-year curriculum for students who hav had two years o 
high-school work and a two-year curriculum for graduates of th^ 
eighth grade. The completion of these counts two years towar« 
the regular Normal-School Diploma. Curriculum provides th< 
remaining courses needed for graduation. Upon finishing thes« 
two curriculums students ar given a special certificate testifying tt 
the accomplishment of this work. These certificates may lawfull: 
be accepted by county superintendents as evidence of qualificatioi 
for third-grade teacher's certificates. 

COUNTRY SCHOOL SPECIAL COURSES 

COURSE ONE 
Country School Teaching 

This course deals with what to teach and how to teach it* 
The first work presented is a discussion of a few of the commoi 
terms used in psychology and in pedagogy, then there is a pre- 
sentation of the basal principles of method in reading, in fonics, ii 
arithmetic, in writing, and in such other subjects as time wil 
permit. A great many devices and helps ar made by the student 
to take to their schools for drills in these branches. 

Text: Charter's Teaching the Common Branches; The Stat' 
Course of Study. Winter, spring, first summer terms. 

COURSE TWO 

Country School Management 

This course deals with country school ideals and how t( 
realize them; and with school property and how to care for anc 
improve it. There is at first some discussion of a few" of the greai 
educational movements and reformers, also some study of present- 
day educators and schools. Other topics discust ar: school law— 
particularly the new Sanitation Law, daily program, seat work 
disciplin, schoolroom decoration, school entertainments, and co- 
operation w^ith school board and patrons. Winter term. 

Text: The Rural School, Its Methods and Management, Gultei 
and Stone. 



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I Illinois State Normal University 127 

COURSE THREE 

j/' Country School Problems 

I This course deals with the district as a unit of study — its 
condition, its needs, and its possibilities. A study of the social 
groups — the school children, the young people not in school, and 
|he householders — and the school itself — common, standard, su- 
erior, and consolidated. Enriching the curriculum with local 
baterial. Establishing and maintaining a social center. 

Text : Rural Life and Education, Cubberly, and Bulletins. 

COURSE FOUR 
Rural Problems 

For advanst students. The students study some of the country 
problems now pressing for solution, and prepare addresses appro- 
priate in speaking before a country audience. Some of the topics 
ar: community leadership, country school supervision, educating 
the old and the young, community friendship, co-operation, ideal 
country school system, ideal country teacher, etc. 

Text: Country Life and the Country School. Carney. 



Country School Extension 

Many country teachers hav a vision of social center work, and 
they ar fortunate enuf to be located in districts that hav alredy 
;felt something of the gain that comes to those who go to school 
to themselvs. Our teachers and students hav been out to various 
each idistricts encouraging this movement. They expect to increase this 
■OM work and make it more helpful to those districts that ar willing 
apij to work with us. All teachers in districts where this work can be 
iQicj^ .done should keep in touch with our plans. 
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128 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



n 



COMMERCE 



In September, 1914, a department of Commercial Branchei 
was establisht to prepare teachers in this fast-growing type o| 
vocational education. The second floor of the Gymnasium Bildin 
has been remodeld and equipt with suitable furniture and applii 
ances to carry on the work. While the department has been or 
ganized primarily as a training school for commercial teachenj 
yet it will give excellent training to such students as prefer secret 
tarial positions in the business world. 

The program is seven terms in length, covering two yeanj 
time. The following courses ar offerd to those who enrol in thj 
department : 

COURSE ONE 

Accounting 

Three terms' work in the theory and practis of accounts, be) 
ginning with the more simple transactions and records of a smalf 
retail business under a single proprietor. This small business iJ 
later enlarged to include wholesaling and the ownership is change.) 
to a partnership. Students ar carefully traind not only in th 
clerical work of bookkeeping but also in the analytical w^ork oj 
the accountant. In the spring term, upon the completion of th' 
assignd work in wholesale partnership, the type of business i; 
again changed and the student is introduced to corporation ac-| 
counting. Cost accounting as applied to the manufacture of jj 
staple product is studied and many proolems in factory accountfif 
offiis management, and production factors, ar taken up. 

Text: Bookkeeping and Accountancy, H. M. Rowe Company.1 
Opportunity lor practis teaching in bookkeeping in the Uni- 
versity High School is given to students who hav successful!: 
completed the Normal course in Accounting. 



COURSE TWO 



I 



Bookkeeping 

The inductiv development of the principles of double-entail 
bookkeeping and their practical application in as many sets as the| 
length of the term will permit. Semi-major. 

Text: Budget 101, Commercial and Industrial Bookkeeping\ 
Rowe. 

COURSE THREE 
Accounting (Summer Term) 
The theory of accounts as developt from the standpoint of th«^T 
practising accountant. Solution of accountancy problems am 
principles as applied to business statements, balance sheets, analy- 
ses, bankruptcy, the designing of bookkeeping systems, etc. 
Prerequisit: Course one. 
Text: Elements of Accounting, Klein. 



ii 



Illinois State Normal University 129 

COURSE FOUR 
Shorthand (First Year) 
The development of fonetic writing as conceivd by Gregg 
jkd workt out in his manual. The Manual is supplemented by 
'ork in shorthand, penmanship, and in progressiv exercizes in- 
Bnded to increase finger dexterity and a thoro understanding and 
kilful application of the principles of shorthand. 
I Bill Text: Manual of Shorthand, Gvegg. 

dafi :^ COURSE FIVE 

^^■i :•"' Shorthand (Second Year) 

^^ A careful review of the Gregg Manual, foUowd by progressiv 

'^^ [ictation taken from standard dictation texts and covering many 
ypes of business correspondence. During the winter term it is 
xpected to bring the student to a writing speed of approximately 
20 words per minute, and to that end there is much dictation ex- 
ending over a wide variety of material, e. g., sermons, addresses, 
lyllabi, testimony, legal forms, etc. Teaching methods ar intro- 
Juced in the spring term and students ar encouraged to increase 

Dllftieir shorthand skill to verbatim speed. 

Texts: Gregg Speed Practis, Gregg. Shorthand Dictation 

m^lxercizes, Eldridge. 

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COURSE SIX 
Typewriting (First Year) 

The touch method is insisted upon in this course. The work 
lone in the course is based upon the subject-matter as containd 
n a standard text, such as the Fritz-Eldridge Expert Typeivriting. 
upplementary work begins during the winter term and consists 
if direct dictation of plain copy for speed and accuracy, plain copy 
it sight, and blindfold dictation. In the spring term, shorthand 
transcript work is begun. The formal work includes thirty-six 
essons in the text as a minimum requirement for one year's credit. 
Thirty words, net, per minute, is the rate pupils ar expected to 
each at the end of the spring term. 

Text: Expert Typewriting, Fritz-Eldridge. 

COURSE SEVEN 
Typewriting (Second Year) 

\i-iM The second year's work begins with a thoro review of finger- 
ing, to be followd by that portion of the text not included in the 
mtlinc for the first year. A portion of the time is devoted to 

kwjijlranscript work. Tabulation, rough drafts, and special work in 
yping makes up the schedule for the winter term. Frequent 
jpeed tests as well as examinations for proficiency certificates, ar 
?iven. During the spring term ofiis appliances ar used in connec- 
tion with this course, and the students ar given the course in olfis 
training as set forth in Offis Training by Sorelle. Students ar 

m expected to reach the certificate speed of sixty words net, per 
ninute, on plain copy. 

T(ixt: Expert Typewriting, Fritz-Eldridge; Offis Training for 
Stenografers, Sorelle. 



3U 



I 



130 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE EIGHT 

Business Correspondence 

This course is given in the fall term of the first year and 
dudes such review of the general rules of grammar, punctuatioi 
and sentence construction as the instructor deems necessary as a 
introduction to the writing of business letters, advertizemen' 
pamflets, etc. Especial attention is given to correspondence froi 
ihe point of view of selling. 

Text: English for Business Uses, Cody. 

COURSE NINE 
Commercial Law 

This is one of the most important of the commercial branche, 
and is very widely taught in the high schools. Two terms ar give 
to the consideration of Commercial Law. The features to whic 
most attention is given ar Contracts, "Negotiable Instruments, Salei 
Agency, Insurance, Bailments, Partnership, Credits and LoanJ 
Corporations, Real and Personal Property, and Settlement of Es 
tates. The preparation of legal forms is included in the course. ' 

Text: Elements of Business Law, Hufcutt. 

COURSE TEN 
Commercial Arithmetic 

This subject is ofiferd for one term in the second year. Thf 
course is designd to include the usual applications of arithmeti 
to business organization, management, accounting, and to sue! 
miscellaneous problems as arise in various types of business. Th 
use of many ruled forms is an important feature. 

COURSE ELEVEN 

Salesmanship and Advertizing: (Summer Term and Spring 

Term of Second Year) 

This course includes tne study of the laws of appeal and re 
sponse as applied to business; the advertizement in its composi 
lion, form and efifectivness ; and the principles of salesmanshij 
(retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and personal). 

Text : Art of Selling, Sheldon. 

COURSE TWELV 
History of Commerce 

The general history of business progress is surveyd : attentioi 
is given to the economic changes that hav taken place in the past 
century, and to the future outlook along the lines of transporta- 
tion, banking, commercial treaties, and world markets. 




Illinois State Normal University 131 



i 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



This department exists because the state needs as teachers 
nen and women of sound helth who ar traind to care for the 
)hysical welfare of their pupils and set before them for imitation 
he example of a dignified and erect bearing. 

Its aims ar two-fold : 

1. For the individual : to supply systematically one essential 
^liement in hygienic living, namely, muscular exercize; and to en- 
ourage as related to this, proper habits of sleep, bathing, ventila- 
ion, and diet, to correct common postural defects, and develop as 
iccurate muscular control as may be possible in the time available. 

2. For the teacher: to make clear the relation between helth 
ind efficiency, the hygienic demand for systematic exercize in ele- 
nentary and high school, and to supply a fairly comprehensiv 
quipment of practical work for use in such schools. 

Three terms' work in physical training is required of all stu- 
dents, and every effort is made to adapt work to individual needs. 
This work is to be taken in the first year unless there be excellent 
easons for postponing it. A careful record of the helth history of 

ilhA^ch entering student is taken and a physical examination given. 
K special class is provided for those thus shown to be unequal to 

53 ] ;he work provided for the average beginner. In the rare cases 
?vhere exercize even in this class is not suitable, individual work 
s prescribed and sufficient observation of class work assignd to 
enable the future teacher to conduct simple exercizes in the 
Ischool-rooms and make intelligent use of games in the school yard. 
For physical training women ar required to hav a regulation 
mit, which should be orderd after arrival at a cost of $3.75. Every 
jvoman needs also an athletic skirt for tennis, hockey, and field 
vvork in Nature-Study, Geografy, and other sciences. This may be 
rderd on arrival or made at home. It should be strong, wide, and 
3f jhoe-top length, preferably navy blue or black. 

Men require for the gymnasium two black sateen shirts, gray 
trousers, and black tennis shoes. These can be obtaind after 
arrival at a cost of not more than $4.00. 



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132 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

COURSE ONE 

Gymnastics, folk dances, plays and games ar taught with con-;| 
sideration of their distinctly effects and suitability for use in thq 
schoolroom or on the playground. Weekly lectures deal witl| 
personal care and social behavior. Especial attention is given t(j 
nose, throat, and teeth, bathing, posture, and dress. 

Four hours' floor work, one hour lecture. Minor. 

COURSE ONE (A) 

Arranged for women whose helth history and physical testtl 
show them not redy for Course I. Enrolment will be limited am] 
special attention given to individual cases. Minor. 



COURSE TWO 



■m 



More vigorous and difficult forms of gymnastics, dancing, anc 
games. Apparatus w^ork is introduced and a study of Bancroft'.^ 
Posture Training of School Children is substituted for weekljj 
lectures. Time requirement as for Course I. Minor. 

COURSE TWO (A) 
A continuation of Course One A. Two hours a week, as spenij 
in observation of practical work and discussion of text. The re- 
maining time is spent on special program of walks and prescribe 
exercizes. Minor. 

COURSE THREE 

Posture training is continued during the first part of the term! 
gymnastics with hand apparatus and simple forms of esthetic] 
dancing ar introduced; organized games playd out of doors occupjj 
a prominent place in this course. Three hours of exercize anc 
two hours for discussion of principles, methods and teaching.-. 
Minor. 

COURSE THREE (A) 1^1 

A continuation of Course Two A with discussion of method 
of teaching. Minor. 

COURSE FOUR (Electiv) ^ 

Outdoor sports, including volley ball, basket ball, hockey,! 
tennis. Reading, discussion, and note books. Time required sameJ 
as preceding courses. Open to women whose physical tests showj 
them equal to such work. Minor. mi 

COURSE FF^E (Electiv) 

Esthetic dancing is offerd twice a week during both winter 
and spring terms. Students taking all of this work receiv one] 
minor credit. Note-books required. Open to all women qualified. 



Illinois State Normal University 133 

COURSE SIX (Elegtiv) 
Gymnastic Teaching and Playground Management 
The first six weeks of the term will be devoted to principles 
nd methods used in Gymnastic teaching, and will be arranged for 
lose who wish to make a specialty of physical training in elemen- 
liry or high schools. During the remaining six weeks the pos- 
ibiiities of the playground, its organization and equipment, will 
e taken up. Playground activities will be considerd in detail, 
nd will be accompanied by supervizion of play in the training 
3hooL Prerequisit: Courses 1 and 2. Spring term. Major. 
Text: The Posture of School Children, Bancroft. 






COURSES FOR MEN 

All men, except those physically disabled, ar required to take 
itie first three courses during the first year of attendance, unless 
cceptable reasons ar given for not doing so. All such men must 
jav the work completed before graduation, unless excused at open- 
ag of the school year before graduation time. 

COURSE ONE (Fall Term) 
Base Ball, Foot Ball, Soccer, and Tennis 
^ I Practis: Four periods per week. Base ball, foot ball, and 
^^ [ennis will begin with the opening of the term. Soccer will take 
he place of base ball when cool wether comes. Each man must 
how a certain degree of skill in two of the four sports to obtain 
liehBredit for the fall term. 

Pedagogy : One period per week. 

1. Rules for foot ball, soccer, and tennis. 2. Lectures on 
ersonal hygiene, training and first aid. 

Books: Official Foot Ball Guide, Official Soccer Guide Official 
^ennis Guide, Note Book. 

COURSE TWO (Winter Term) 
Elementary Marching, Calisthenics, Hevy Apparatus, Volley 
Ball, Indoor Base Ball, and Basket Ball 
Practis : Five periods per week. 

COURSE THREE (Spring Term) 
Base Ball, Track and Field Athletics, and Tennis 

Practis: Four periods per week. Base ball two periods. Track 
|7ork two periods. Credit will be given for tennis two periods 
er week, provided one period is given to base ball and one to 
pack work. 

Pedagogy : One period per week. Rules for base ball. Rules 
if track and fleld. Training. 

Books: Official Base Ball Guide, Intercollegiate Athletic 
handbook. Note Book. 



134 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

COURSE FOUR (Elegtiv, Fall Term) 

Prerequisit: Course 1. 

Practis: With University foot ball team, or class team" 
base ball and soccer. 

Pedagogy: Four periods per week. 1. Rules of foot ball 
soccer, and tennis from the standpoint of coaching and officiatinil 
2. Officiating in class games and 'Varsity practis games. 
Training. 4. First aid to injured. 

Books: Official Football Guide, Official Soccer Guide, 0/1 
ficial Tennis Guide. Text-books will be announst at opening of tt 
term. 

Major : One credit. 

COURSE FIVE (Elegtiv, Winter Term) 

Prerequisit: Course 2. 

Practis: Two periods per week in intermediate gymnastic 
— free handwork, light apparatus, and hevy apparatus. 

Pedagogy: Three periods per week. Practis in teaching 
marching and gymnastics. Place of physical training in educa 
tion. Leading systems of gymnastics. Methods of teachini 
Physiological effects of exercize. 

Books: Teaching of Elementary School Gymnastics, W. 1 
Bowen; Manual of Marching, Cornell and Berry; Official Bash 
Ball Rules; Official Volley Ball Rules; Note Book; extensiv librar 
work. 

N. B. — Those taking this course will need to keep open eithe 
the seventh period or the eighth period two days per week to Uf 
in teaching squads in Course 2. 

Major: One credit. 

COURSE SIX FOR MEN (Elegtiv, Spring Term) 

Prerequisit: Course 3. 

Practis: University base ball and track team, or class bas 
ball and track team. 

Pedagogy: Four periods per week. Base ball rules frc 
standpoint of coaching and officiating. Track base ball rules fror 
standpoint of coaching and officiating. Athletic administratioi 
Management of athletic meets. Play and playgrounds. 

Major: One credit. 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 135 

COURSES IN LIBRARY METHOD 

COURSE ONE 
The Use of the Library 

Ten weekly lessons for all first-year students. The practical 
rt of the work is to be applied by each student to the work that 
has on hand for the term. Wednesdays to take the place of 
ysical Training. 

COURSE TWO 
The Formation and Care of School Libraries 
Eight weekly lectures, spring term. Same in five weekly lee- 
3, first summer term. Course illustrated with exhibits of 
)ks and library equipment. An hour a week outside of the lec- 
es will giv full time for examining the exhibits and arranging 
J note-books. 

COURSE THREE 
Library Pragtis 

The librarian offers a course also in library apprentisship 
ich includes simple details of the care, management, and use of 
ibrary, with mending books, mounting pictures, etc. From four 
six students ar employd each term as library assistants; this 
ords further instruction and practis in library administration. 

Special instruction is offerd to juniors and seniors in the 
sparation of term papers and graduation themes. 

Fall term. 



' 



136 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



f: 



KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT 

This department includes a well-equipt kindergarten in chsu 
of a director and assistant, and a second kindergarten for tra; 
ing at the Soldiers' Orphans Home. 

It offers to students an opportunity for observation and 
practis in the teaching of classes. Children may enter at the i 
of four, and ar expected to remain two years. The kindergarl 
is primarily a social institution and stands for co-operativ act; 
ity. It aims to develop children physically, mentally, aid moral 
by directing their natural activities in an educational way. I 
cause the kindergarten has proved a potent factor in transform 
modern educational theory and practis, there has come about a c 
mand for primary teachers who hav been traind in the princip 
and methods of the kindergarten. 

The Kindergarten Primary Course is offerd to meet this ( 
mand. It covers a period of two years. Students ar admitted 
the opening of the fall term only. They must be graduates of 
approved high school, or hav done equivalent work, and mi 
sing and play the piano wel enuf to conduct the work. 

Three terms of observation and teaching in the Kindergart 
and two terms of teaching in the primary grade ar required. 

KINDERGARTEN TECHNICS (Junior Year) 

This course includes a study of the gifts, occupations, son 
stories, plays and games of the kindergarten: original exercis 
ar pland by each member of the class, and presented for d: 
cussion and criticism. 

Gifts : This comprises a study of the Froebelian gifts as e(i 
cational toys, in connection with other play materials, to disco\ 
their value as mediums of expression. 

Occupations : The kindergarten occupations ar studied in CQ 
nection with modern construction work and nature materials suit 
to the needs of children. 

Games and Rhythms: In this connection a study is made 
the play instincts of children. Plays and games adapted to difife 
ent stages of the child's development ar considerd, their educ 
tional value noted, and practis given in playing kindergart 
games. A classification of plays and games is made, includi: 
motor, sensory, and dramatic plays, traditional ring games, rhytl 
mic exercizes and marches. 

Stoi-y -Telling-. A study is made of the different kinds 
stories, their origin and value. Principles of selection, adapt 
tion, and classification ar considerd and opportunity is given 
tell stories to different groups of children. 

Text: For the Story Teller, Bailey. 



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^ Illinois State Normal University 137 

KINDERGARTEN THEORY (Junior, Two Terms) 

The aim of this course is a study of Froebel's general theories 
I Mother Plays, in connection with modern child-study liter- 



re. 
Texts: FroebeVs Educational Laws, Hughes; The Mother 

y, Froebel. 

KINDERGARTEN THEORY (Senior Year) 

^Tall term. 

This course includes a study of the history of the kindergar- 

and the relation of the kindergarten to the primary grades. 

Text: History of the Kindergarten in American Education, 
bdewalker. 

Winter term. 

This course deals with the principles of program-making, 
problems in administration, and of the Montessori system of 
ication. 

SPECIAL COURSE (Spring Term) 

This course is pland for primary teachers who wish some 
bwledge of the principles and practis of the kindergarten. It 
recommended to teachers who ar training for primary work. 

fases of kindergarten work ar discust, with daily observation 
[groups of children. 

PRACTIS TEACHING 



The Training Department consists of the Elementary School 
luding a kindergarten and eight grades, and of the University 
?h School. The school of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, with 
irly five hundred pupils, is used as a school of oservation and 
eijioi ictis. Twenty-three teachers devote their entire time to this 
partment; several others assist in the training-school work. 

The Training School is designd to give careful and extensiv 
lining in the art of teaching in all grades and in all the special 
jects taught in public schools. Each student in the Normal 
lool and Teachers College is required to teach three terms. In 
ne cases the daily observation and criticism of a class, followd 
a written or oral discussion ar taken in lieu of one term in 
3h of the three departments, Primary, Intermediate, and Gram- 
ir School. But students desiring to fit themselvs for any par- 
ular grade of school work, or any special branch of study, ar 
ren an opportunity to do so. Teachers of satisfactory training 
d experience who wish to prepare themeselvs for expert work 
training teachers ar allowd all the advantages of the Training 
ihool. 



138 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

The work of teaching is carefully supervized by the train 
teachers. Each student teacher is required to write out the ph^ 
of recitation one week in advance. These plans ar closely exami 
by the training teacher and, where necessary, discust with 1 
student teacher and revized. The instruction itself is also obsei 
by the training teacher, and helpful criticisms ar given in priva 
Each practising teacher is held fully responsible for the control a 
management, as well as for the instruction of the class. He 
expected to develop skill and power in management and instructi 
of a class as a whole, and at the same time to study and adr 
the work to the individual ability and disposition of each puj 
As far as possible during the last two terms of his instructii 
the student teacher is given charge of a room; so he is supervizi 
one class at the same time that he is teaching another. 

Each week, two illustrativ or "critique" lessons ar given 
experienst teachers. Teachers and observers ar required to obse 
one of these lessons each week. An hour following the less 
is devoted to its careful discussion under the direction of 
supervizor of the Training School. This gives each teacher 
opportunity each term to see eleven such lessons carefully pr 
sented and thoroly discust. 

In all observation of the students attention is directed — 

1. To the teacher's preparation for the work thru mast^ 
of subject-matter, lesson planning and providing external meai 

2. To the teacher's skill in teaching as shown in skill in a 
signment, in skill in questioning, in energy, in disciplin, in po\« 
of holding attention thru interest, in rediness to meet emergenci 
in attention to details of form and position, in ability to disce 
and meet the needs of individual pupils, in the use of apparat 
and other aids, in attention to the physical condition of pupils, 
attention to the language of pupils. 

3. To the teacher's personal fitness as reveald in his di\ 
tude towards his pupils and his work, his ability to make use 
criticism, his voice, language, manner, and personal care 
mechanical work. 

Certain students ar also appointed regularly to supervl 
the children at noon, recesses, and during study periods. 

The training teachers present illustrativ lessons, at su« 
times as ar convenient, for the benefit of the students who 
preparing for work in the Training School. 



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Illinois State Normal University 139 

luRSE OF STUDY IN THE ELEMENTARY 
TRAINING SCHOOL 

A brief statement of the course is made below. A detaild 
lalysis by subjects, years and terms will be furnisht on appli- 

tion. 

i Literature.— D3ii\Y exercize in Mother Goose, Robmson Crusoe, 
liawatha, The Jungle Book, and stories and poems from other 
fiters thru the first three years. From the fourth year thru the 
ighth the literature is combined with the reading. 

Reading,— Three lessons per day during the first two years, 
jae lesson per day in all other except the seventh. In the seventh 
iar reading alternates with history. 

Writing, — Writing exercizes occur daily during the first two 



dtofl [jars and one term of the seventh year. 

! Spelling,— T>a.i\Y spelling exercizes thru the seventh grade 
pon words occurring in regular studies. 

Lan^wa^e.— Incidental training thru the first six years. 
English Grammar.— Daily exercizes thru seventh and eighth 
3ars in all terms but one; two lessons per week in that term. The 
ork follows the Illinois State Course of Study. 
j Arithmetic— The Illinois State Course of Study is strictly 
DalffiJ)llowd thruout the eight years. 

Geografy. — Daily lessons from the third year thru the seventh. 
,.u«, History.— Or di\ presentation of pioneer history stories during 
nmn jie fourth year. Daily lessons in United States History during 
to di le fifth and sixth years and two terms of the eighth year. In the 
appi! 3venth year history alternates with reading. 

Civil Government. — Last term of eighth year. 

Nature Study.— Bsiily lessons in garden, the campus, or the 



ibisi reenhouse in the fall and spring terms in the last four years: 
akeii 1 the spring terms of fifth, sixth, and seventh years, in fall and 
il efi pring terms of the eighth year. 

Elementary Physics. — Daily lessons during winter terms of 
11 years but seventh and eighth and also m the fall term of fifth 
nd seventh years. 

Astronomy. — Fall term of sixth year. 

Physiology. — Oral lessons in lower grades. Daily lessons with 
extbook in winter terms— seventh and eighth years. 

Music. — Twenty minutes daily in all grades. 

Z)raw;m^.— Exercizes averaging three per week in all grades 
bove second. In primary grades associated with other studies. 

Manual Training.— Dd^ily exercizes in primary grades, alter- 
lating with drawing in grades three to six; in seventh and eighth 
ears pupils spend two hours per week at bench work in shop. 

Physical Training. — Brief daily exercizes in schoolroom. Reg- 
ilar lessons from the physical director on Wednesday. 



140 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

STUDENTS 

Teachers College Graduates 

name county postoffis 

Baine, Mary Jane McLean Bloomingtor 

Dilling, Huldah Adine (Wisconsin) Fond du Lac 

Gould, Catherine Regina McLean Bloomingtor 

Heller, Lottie Theresa McLean Norma 

Lawson, Vena Frances McLean Normal 

McCune, Margaret McLean Chenoa 

Potts, Ethel Lena McLean Normal 

Reid, Olive Marion Sangamon Springfield 

Showers, Fannie Elizabeth Moultrie Bethany 

Smith, Sylvia Edna McLean Normal 

Stansbury, Anna McLean Normal 

Sutton, Effle Howarth McLean Bloomington 

Walkup, Eunice Earle McLean Normal 

Blackburn, Samuel Alfred Madison Edwardsville 

Geneva, William Blaine McLean Bloomington 

Harr, Leonodus Thomas Macoupin Palmyra 

Hartin, Fred Clay Xenia 

Lay, Chester Frederick Pope Golconda 

Mayo, William Emera McLean Normal 

Nickerson, William Henry Ford Gibson City 

Welsh, Michael C Knox Williamsfield 

Junior College Graduates 

NAME county POSTOFFIS 

Ambrose, Ruth McLean Hudson 

Amidon, Adeline Margaret Kankakee Herscher 

Beckwith, Lorena Gaylord McLean Normal 

Beierman, Anna Josephine Montgomery Raymond' 

Belsley, Olive Viola Woodford Metamora 

Bond, Mildred Constance McLean Normal 

Brand, Dorothy Mildred McLean Normal 

Breese, Rachel Gwen McLean Lexington 

Bressie, Lorna McLean Bloomington 

Brock, Helen Ruth Kankakee Kankakee 

Brusch, Anna Sarah McLean Normal 

Corder, Florence Victoria Lake Zion City 

DeVore, Helen Louise McLean Bloomington 

Dodson, Christine McLean Bloomington m 

Foote, Idah Frances Pike Pittsfleld M 

Gee, Gladys Lorraine McLean Bloomington « 

Hahn, Christine Livingston Dwight 

Haven, Grace Shier DeWitt Kenney 

Hendrix, Edna Pearl Piatt Bement 

Herriott, Hazel May McLean Normal 

Jackson, Leila Elvina LaSalle Rutland 

Johnson, Myrtle Katherine Will Joliet 

Lytle, Manta Marie Greene White Hall 

McGee, Harriet Evalyn Shelby Moweaqua 

Martin, Blanche Moultrie Sullivan 

Morehouse, Winifred McLean Normal 

Morris, Bertha May .Alenard Greenview 

Powers, Alice Josephine (Indian Madura 

Rainwater, Ethel Elizabeth .... Pike Pittsfield 

Reed, Viola Marguerite McLean Bloomington 

Riley, Julia Marie Gallatin Ridgway 

Rock, Edna Gwendolyn DeWitt Farmer City 

Root, Susan Verne Brown Versailles 



i 



Illinois State Normal University 



141 



NAME 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

lawyer, Laura Eleanor DeWitt Vffin^^ham 

loan, Grace Yeraginia Effingham ^ PhPiX 

tatler, Leona Frances K^-^?^^ P^vmond 

Sy, Ellen Lillian Montgomery p?5^np 

^oods, Irene Coral Macoupm ^^^.^vmond 

erkes, Neena Montgomery n^^JCJe 

r.nwTi ^AorffP William Greene ;.^^°°",'^^ m^^ 

Madison Edwardsville 

LaSalle T??^^^ 

Putnam McNabb 

Adams • • Liberty 

Wabash Keensburg 

Vermilion Potomac 

Douglas Garrett 

Coles Charleston 

'.*.;;'. Vermilion Danville 

Pike Barry 

Greene Carrollton 

^,,^^y xvixuxxctoi xvo... Gallatin Ridgway 

5cott; Walter Jefferson Montgomery ^^-^^^^ 

^mith, Carl Weems ^ Logan T nm n 

mith, George Ernest , Logan Npw*-RnrS^?dP 

hrogmorton, J. Norris Johnson ^^'Sn^yn^fipld 

ownsend, Clarence E Sangamon r,^P^''^^r?f v 

rschentke, Herman L Iroquois ^^^^^nL^pl 

^iley, Frank Grant Henry Kewanee 

Normal School Graduates 



Brown, George William 
Caton, Thomas Marion 
boodwin. Freeman C. 
Praham, John William 
Irubb, Robert Willis . 

[iigginson, Glenn 

[cLaren, Homer D. . . 
iklasterson, Maurice . . . 
killer, Perl Hobart . . 
kingee, Wilbert D. . . 

Myers, Harry Lee 

Purl, Rutherford Keith 
Riley, Michael Kelly 



name section 

tl^ndrew, Feme Iva A 

lelsley, Grace Agnes B 

lennett, Cora Eva L 

lierbower, Mabel Fern G 

loies, Edith Georgette GH 

{reese, Annie Dyfi B 

Jiirns, Nettie Chloe C 

Jutier, Grace Marion D 

chambers, Jennie L 

Clayton, Eula Grace B 

>eel, Edith Mae A 

Mhfield, Helen B 

'usick, Nora A 

)are, Mabel Lena H 

)avis, Alfa A 

)oherty, Edna Marguerite . . . C 

)ole, Mary Izetta A 

Mds, Myrtus Verne C 

^airbairn, Alice Beatrice B 

i'oster, Nannie Louise B 

fFrye, Leona Maye L 

[Gates, Anna E B 

JGlover, Hazel Genevieve L 

Halkyard, Marguerite B 

Flarper, Anna Belle B 

Heavener, Dora English B 

Flehort, Mary Cecelia B 

Hf^lnor, Kathryn H 

Hindle, Margaret Ellen B 

Hito, Lucretia Rufiner H 

Howell, Minnie L 

Hucni, Marie Esther B 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

McLean Heyworth 

Woodford Metamora 

Henry Annawan 

McLean Bellflower 

McLean Bloom ington 

McLean Lexington 

Bureau Princeton 

McLean Bloomington 

Edgar Metcalfe 

Ford Kempton 

Macon Decatur 

Tazewell Minier 

Peoria Edwards 

Mason Mason City 

Macon Decatur 

(North Dakota) Fairmount 

Kankakee Manteno 

McLean Normal 

Will Joliet 

Warren Monmouth 

Woodford Secor 

Will Plainfield 

Marshall Magnolia 

Will Joliet 

Douglas Newman 

Ford Piper City 

Christian Assumption 

McLean Lexington 

Will Joliet 

St. Clair East St. Louis 

Schuyler Rushville 

Livingston Forrest 



142 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Huston, Aletha D B McLean GroDsev =& 

Jacobs, Emma Etnelred A McLean Normal # 

Jones, Mabel Elizabeth G McLean [,[ Norma 

Keller, Edna May A Macon Harristovm 

Kidney, Mary Zita B Henry GenesT^ 

Kiger, Ellen Owens L McLean '* Normal 

Larrick, Caroline Letitia L McLean '. Bloominffton 

Larson, Anna Matilda L McLean Normal 

Leach, Mae Elizabeth B Will * "* joi ff 

Litchfield, Ruth liene B Marshall Toluca 

Loudon, Janet Elizabeth B McLean Bloominffton 

Lyons, Sarah Ann F McLean Bloominston 

McGormick, Mary Grace G McLean Normal 

McMannis, Virginia H LaSalle .*.**** LaSa Ip 

McManus, Mrs. Laura G Madison Collinsvi a 

New Ruth G Brown TimeweU 

Newkirk, Frieda Elizabeth . . .B Will ToliPf 

Niess, Minnie L St. Glair ;.* M^scoutah 

Oakes, Dorothy Aiberta A Macon De^^^^^ 

Parker, Dolph Minella H Warren \' Monmouth 

Parks, Agnes Margaret B Will .. Joliet 

Phillipp, Evalyn Victoria G Mason * * * San Jose 

Pinckert, Lydia Marie J DuPage BensenvillA 

Pollard, Rena Glaire G Warren . .* Monmouth 

Ramp, Jennie Gale B Marshall . Lacon ^ 

Rathje, Hulda Doiothea G Will " * Peo+one 

Raycraft, Irene B McLean Bioomington 

Roach, Mary Margaret L McLean Danvers 

Rohweder, Helen H Douglas Tuscola 

Rosenberger, Martha Jane ...B Gass Beardstnwn 

Sallenbach, Vivian Gertrude .B Will .'. .* JqiTS 

Sherman, Mrs. Floy G Schuyler '..;.' Rushville 

Stem, Rath Marguerite G Christian Pana 

Stevens, Leah Ida A Marion , . . . 'Centralia 

Stewart, Addie Iris L McLean * LeRov 

Stimson, Fay 4 ?>yette ., 'Vandalia 

fetocker, Alice J Madison Highland 

Struble, Marie Ida B DeWitt ! ! ! ! . Glinton 

^wmg, Lillian N A Mason ' M^son City 

Thomas, Nma . L Brown Versailles 

Titus Mary Elizabeth B Henry *. . ^^'eneTel 

Tobey, Litta A Macon Decatur 

Vogelbacher, Josephine A Ford Piper City 

Wallace, Ida Lizzie A Mason * Havana 

Westhoff, Margaret D McLean * Normal 

Wilson, Clara Roundtree B Kankakee Grant Park 

Winchester, Zella A Peoria *. . Elmore 

Won, Pansy Martha B Mason San Jose 

Wright, Nelle Elizabeth A McLean McLean 

Zellhoefer, Lulu Elizabeth ..B McLean * " I erov 

Bovver, Lewis Herbert L Piatt .* Bement 

Braden. Noah 1 Gass Beardstown 

Dragoo, Alva WiPiam E Douglas Murdock 

Duncanson, Mark I Peoria Pporia 

Hooker, Leroy L Pope . . , Grantsburg 

Huflfmaster, Clifford William .L Shelby Stewardson 

Johnson, John Henry L Peoria Mapleton 

Kerr. Grover William L Wayne Mt Erie 

Klier, Harry L Jasper Newton 

Le Marr, Paul Earl L Macoupin Palmyra 

Lesseg, George Edward L Calhoun Brussels 

Liberty, Henry Louis E Will *. Joliet 



Illinois State Normal University 



143 



NAME SECTION 

leyer, Harold Francis E 

tills, Telia Brewer i^ 

►ettys, Wilbur Or.ando ^ 

lileitz, George Henry ^ 

rappen, Russell Goldmg ^ 

Itaubeneck, Ignatius D i^ 

'heis, Raymond Carl ...i^ 

^an Petten, Franklin T. . . I 

^alker, Fred Woodward ^ 

^atson, Myron T g 

^est, Clyde Irwin ^ 

'iemers, Julius Eawara i^ 

^illey, Homer I 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

McLean Lexington 

Lawrence Chaunoey 

Champaign Urbana 

Christian Pana 

Will Joliet 

Qlark Marshall 

Tazewell * Minier 

McLean Bloomington 

Mason Mason City 

Christian Assumption 

Madison Edwardsville 

Macoupin . . Bunker Hill 

Putnam McNabb 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Teachers College and Normal School 

September 11, 1916— June 7, 1917 



name 
kcree, Blanche Cora . 

Adams, Grace 

Ahrens, Lillian ...... 

plbright. Norma Aline 
pLlderson, Ethel May . 
yviexander, Edith May 



POSTOFFIS 



SECTION COUNTY 

K Sangamon Auburn 

. . .N Clark West Union 

K Woodford Cazenovia 

.,..GH McLean - 2,°^"^^^ 

B Sangamon Thayer 

/MPx^uut.1 o^ui.ix x.cc*^ K Madison Madison 

A exande^; Juli^ . . .^ g McLean ^^^""Siflfo'rd 

Alexander, Mary Louise B Iroquois Gre^nfieW 

Allen, Lola Faye G Greene Rinnmln-ton 

Ambrose, Lillian Ruth A McLean ^^"^Sep^S 

Anderson, Hulda ;; • • ^g Putnam Achkum 

Anderson, Nellie Elizabeth ..N Iroquois ArooS 

Apple, Viola Frances B Coles HPvwo?th 

Arbuckle, Daisy Merle N McLean Hey worth 

Arends, Henrietta Alma A Ford qtreaTo? 

Armstrong, Lura Agnes F LaSalle Normal 

Armstrong, Violet Elaine . . . .N McLean rkrlinvTue 

Arnett, Irene Esther B Macoupin hinnm n^ on 

Ashton, Doris Elizabeth A McLean § nZ nItoS 

Augustin, Blanche Louise ...B McLean § onm nItoS 

Aultin, Lois S JJfH^/' A ^n?ri^ Ba? 

Baeuerle, Anna Marie B Woodford Spring Bay 

Bailey, Bernice Huldah G McLean Rot pM own 

Bailey Rose J^ Calhoun ^^^NnS 

Baird. Louise Emma McLean formal 

Baird, Orpha Margaret M Bureau Rat av a 

Baker, Edith Burr A Kane Normal 

ltfe1i!St.y^Mill ::::::::| F ••••■■•■••••••• 'ilS 

Bash, Neva Mary P Champaign ^RpiTSr 

Bateman, Daisy C A McLean FooksvYue 

Bayless, Lois Esther B McLean Pnnk.v e 

Beath. Bernice Harriett P McLean Wavnesv I 

Bebout, Lillie N DeWitt ^ rPupv e 

Beck, Helen Elizabeth K St. Clair Washington 

Belsley, Bessie G Tazewell Washington 



1 



I 



144 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS ft 

Belsley, Ida May P Woodford Metamora' 

Benner Pauline H Macoupin . BuE Hm 

Bennett, Fern Marie L DeWitt Clinton 

Bennett, Hazel Julia P Livingston Chatsworth 

Bennett Mabel Minerva G Livingston Pont^a? 

Bennington, Bernice A Marshall *. ' * * LaS 

Bierbower Grace Evanda . . . A McLean * Beimower 

Billmgs. Madge Fern G McLean . . No?mal 

Biven, Viva Gertrude N McLean ......;. .Le?oy 

B oom, Elsie Mae L Putnam GranvillP 

Blossom, Mma Lucretia B McLean !. Cooksv 1 le 

Bockwitz, Laura Alma GH Mason . . San Josp 

Bond, Eva N Ford * Gibson G^tv 

Bonser Luella M Shelby : : .' Pana 

Boswell Marguerite G LaSalle V * * ' Tonica 

Botts,. Mrs. Martha P Gook Gh^ca^n 

gressie, Ramona K McLean *. . .*; Bloomington 

Bretall. Florence Garmen ...G Gook Oak Pa?t' 

Bridgf ord, Gonstance G Mercer *. Aledn 

Brookhart, Edith Ethel A Lawrence .* LawrencevillP 

Brown, Lucile Cora G Iroquois . . . ...... cTssna Park 

Brown, Maude Leona M McLean .........*. ..HuS 

Browne, Dorothy K Madison AitoS 

Browning Glio Ethel K Macon " * Decatur 

Bryant, Ada Ellen N Jackson Murphysboro 

Bryant Helen Louise B Ford . (Sbson Git? 

Buck, Clara Marguerite M Peoria Princevilll 

Buckert, Estella May B Hancock l! .Warsaw 

Buckley, Laura Carolyn D Menard Petersburff 

Bu ock, Clara Edna ........ .K McLean . . . . ...... . .Norma! 

Bullock, Norma Esther J McLean Norma 

Bunker, Hettie Isabelle K Sangamon V.V.* Chatham 

Burke, Cora B McLean Bloominffton 

Burkmshaw, Jessie Blanche . .K Hancock . L^HarSe ' 

Burns, Charlotte Elizabeth . . . A Livingston ....!. " * Dwiffh? " 

Burns, Margaret Jennie B Peoria Ppona 

Bushert, Beatrice Edna A Moultrie .■.*.*.**." Lovinffton 

Buss, Matilda Richland ..... ...."..'. ofne? 

Button, Jessie Frances F Ford .... * * Paxton 

Butzow, Ernestine L B Iroquois ...*.*.*.*.'.*.".*.* Wellington 

Byrne, Mary B LaSalle Seneca 

Cade, Ruth Hazel K Champaign '/ Penfield 

Caldwell Virginia K McLean Arrowsmith 

Po V •^' T®^^^ V • • •,• il Jjo^^ois Cresent City 

Calkins, Irma Aurelia G Kane Sugar Grove 

Callahan Nonie M B McLean * Bloomington 

Calvin, Florence Mae M Livingston Cornell 

Cameron, Ida B Christian .' " Pana 

Cameron, Mary Ella A Ford Gibson Gitv 

Campbell, Esther Mae B McLean Normal 

Campbell, Genevieve P McLean ..../. Normal 

Campbell, Grace Virginia N Livingston Fairbury 

n^^ii^®^,^?^®.. • -x*, ^ McLean Bloomington 

Cash Elsie Myrtle D Vermilion Hoopeston 

Caughey, Mabel Agnes P Livingston Chatsworth 

Caughey Nelle Mae F Livingston Chatsworth 

Cessna, Hester Ellen A Vermilion Danville 

Chapman, Jessie Ruby K Montgomery Ravmond 

C'hristman, Florence M B Livingston Dwight 

Clark, Essie Dale K McLean Normal 

Clark, Ethel G Greene Roodhouse 

Gleary, Alice B McLean Gridley 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 



145 



NAME SECTION 

ieary, Ella Mary A 

Ijendenen, Myra Maud B 

[jevenger, Hildred M 

Ickelreas, Margaret M K 

illier, Sarah Reeve D 

>llins, Bertha 

)llins, Eloise Gibson K 

lllins, Verna Mae A 

>Iyer, Mary Tyree K 

jlyer, Mildred Erhardt K 

!>nklin, Nadine A 

mnor, Elizabeth G B 

)ok, Julia G 

)oke, Mary Gertrude L 

)oper, Nellie Florence M 

>per, Ruth Dora A 

^■ey, Katherine F 

ff, Lela Mae A 

faiger, Bessie Agnes H 

pomer, Fern Luetta B 

)ss, Elma Crea M 

mch, Burta Aline G 

bwder, Sadie Faye P 

^owell, Ordie Fern G 

mningham, Gecile F H 

ister, Luella Marie GH 

miels, Louisa GH 

'e, Lora Genevieve K 

irling, Grace Adelaide H 

irnall, Jane Estelle A 

!auber, Rose Anne A 

avidson, Hazel N 

avidson, Lila Evada N 

avis, Dana Marie B 

avis, May Randolph P 

iwson, Gladys Opal B 

ay, Anna Frances A 

ay, Rachel Edna A 

3an, Mary Lervina K 

?ems, Lorena Velma N 

Bttra, Roseanna K 

3ttra, Sada F 

3tweiler, Lavina M 

insmore, Ernestine G H 

insmore, Helen Marr L 

odd, Luella Irene O 

adson, Kathleen K 

aner, AHce Amanda L 

aoley, Iris Georgia K 

'wney. Norma Phoebe G 

owns, Jennie L 

ennan, Pearl A 

abson, Gladys Matilda L 

ufT. Jane Mae L 

aff, Julia Edith H 

aga, Irene Alece B 

arham, Margaret Bessie . .GH 

avail, Ruby B 

iton, Alice Gora K 

Iwards, Pearl Lela N 

?ger, Barbara Katherine . . . G 

liott, Fae Arline F 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

McLean Gridley 

Sangamon Illiopolis 

Madison Alton 

Fayette Vandalia 

Menard Petersburg 

Adams Quincy 

Macon Decatur 

McLean Saybrook 

Douglas Garrett 

Douglas Garrett 

McLean Normal 

Macon Niantic 

(Iowa) Mitchellville 

McLean Bloomington 

Macon Decatur 

Piatt Monticello 

McLean Bloomington 

Moultrie Lovington 

Stephenson Freeport 

St. Glair Marissa 

DeWitt Weldon 

Livingston Forrest 

Moultrie Bethany 

Morgan Waverly 

Morgan Murrayville 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

Mason Mason Gity 

Tazewell Green Valley 

Livingston Fairbury 

Putnam Putnam 

Marion Tonti 

Marion Tonti 

Bond Mulberry Grove 

Livingston Forrest 

Iroquois Milford 

Ford Roberts 

Macon Moweaqua 

Pike Pittsfield 

McLean Bloomington 

Schuyler Rushville 

Schuyler Rushville 

Woodford Gongerville 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

Ford Loda 

McLean Bloomington 

Moultrie Bethany 

McLean Leroy 

Gook Ghicago 

McLean Normal 

Sangamon Ghatham 

Piatt Monticello 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

Edgar '... Paris 

Bureau Walnut 

Douglas Newman 

McLean Normal 

Hamilton Dahlgren 

McLean Bloomington 

Adams Payson 



146 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME SECTION 

Elliott, Winifred P 

Emert, Josie P 

Emunds, Paula G. E G 

Ensor, Ruth DF 

Epkens, Ruth Esther H 

Espy, Carrie Aleta K 

Evans, Leta Clair B 

Evatt, Estella GH 

Everts, Margaret Helen A 

Ewbank, Grace Elizabeth . . .GH 

Fairchild, Agnes Elda M 

Farrell, Irene Agatha K 

Fehr, Lillian Charlotte G 

Fickwiler, Mary Caroline A 

Flach, Opal M 

Fluck, Ruth B 

Flynn, Ruth Gertrude A 

Foster, Bertha Marie K 

Foster, Edna Marguerite K 

Foster, Grace Beatrice B 

Fraker, Helen Josephine G 

Freeman, Jessie Orvetta D 

French, Ada Evadne O 

French, Vera Eleanor N 

Frink, Hazel Belle K 

Frost, Weltha Belle M 

Fry, Laura Ware D 

Funk, Lela K 

Gardner, Roberta Ethel A 

Gehr, Elsie Ernestine C 

Gillan, Ruth Caroline K 

Gilliland, Elfleda Holmes ...GH 

Gipson, Lela Ethel K 

Girard, Florence Naomi L 

Gittings, Kathleen K 

Glass, Mary Loretto B 

Goley, Anna Winifred N 

Goley, Margaret Manila N 

Golike, Esther P 

Gooch, Mary Esther D 

Gray, Margaret Augusta K 

Green, Frances W K 

Green, Mildred Edna M 

Greer, Gladys Moore C 

Gregory, Deborah Marie K 

Greimann Elda N 

Greiner, Roberta Louise C 

Grigsby, Sadie Ann L 

Gueff roy, Edna Mae K 

Guthrie, Emma Louise A 

Halkyard, Marcita B C 

Hall, Annas Belle P 

Halliday, Mary Hazel K 

Hampton, Frances Willard . .L 

Hanks, Agnes Bee F 

Hanks, Mina Elizabeth B 

Hanner, Lola Irene 

Harbert, Ola Frances N 

Harrison, Anna Sarah M 

Harrison, Ethel Marie M 

Harrison, Ruth GH 

Harszy, Edna Marie M 



COUNTY POSTOPPIS 

McLean Bloomingt 

Fayette Vandal 

St. Clair Bellevili 

Richland 01n.| 

Tazewell Pek J 

Crawford Palesti 

Douglas Arcc 

(Arkansas) Waldri 

Marshall Rutlai 

McLean Bell flow 

Tazewell Pek 

Grundy Kinsm; 

McLean Norm 

Ford Melv 

Iroquois Crescent Ci 

Bureau Princet 

Vermilion Danvi^ 

McLean Bloomingt 

Peoria Elmwo^ 

Sangamon Illiopo 

Shelby Shelbyvi: 

McLean Norm 

McLean Ler^ 

Will Peoto 

McLean Arrowsmi 

Greene Ka 

Hancock WarsF 

McLean Norrr 

Marshall Rutla 

Marshall Sparlai 

Tazewell Tremo 

McLean Norir; 

McLean Bloomingt 

Iroquois Clift 

Hancock LaHar 

Will Joli 

Livingston Emingt 

Livingston Emingt 

Madison Bethal 

St. Clair Bellevi 

Macon Blue Mou^ 

Edgar Chrism 

Scott Nap: 

Schuyler Rushvi 

Shelby Moweaq^ 

Bond Hookda 

Woodford Sec 

Marion Central 

McLean Bloommgt( 

Livingston Fairbu 

Will Joli 

Cass Chandlervil 

McLean Bellflow 

Sangamon Mechanicsbu 

Clark Martinsvil 

Clark Martinsvil 

Logan Fancy Prair 

McLean Bloomingt( 

Menard Fancy Prair 

Menard Fancy Prair 

DeWitt Clint( 

St. Clair Freebu 



oomi 



Pal 



Illinois State Normal University 147 

NAME SECTION COUNTY P03T0FFIS 

^yes, Teresa Coletta A Woodford ElPaso 

lymond, Opal Mae N Kankakee Bourbonnais 

laly, Kathryn Lauretta N LaSalle Wenona 

jer, Catherine A St. Glair Mascoutah 

er, Christina A St. Clair Mascoutah 

Iffenstein, Bertha M B Tazewell Pekin 

Iffenstein, Louise B Tazewell Pekin 

mry, Emma Susan M Morgan Woodson 

irndon, Anna Beulah B Tazewell Minier 

barger, Mabel Ruth B Ford Sibley 

gginson, Mrs. Esther M McLean Normal 

ggs, Lilian Gertrude F Peoria Trivoli 

ght, Mrs. Mary Belle A Bureau Sheffield 

Us, Ina Mae A Kendall Lisbon 

nthorn, Blanche L K McLean Norm_al 

)gan, Edith P McLean Normal 

)ke, Georgietta Dorlisoa ...A Livingston Pontiac 

)lley, Blanche Minnie D McLean Normal 

)llis, Georgia P McLean Randolph 

)lmes, Adelene G DeWitt Farmer City 

)lmes, Olive Blanche L Vermilion Hoopeston 

)od, Fern Florence G Champaign Mahomet 

)Opes, Edith Helen A Fulton Ipava 

)rne, Caroline Thelma B St. Clair East St. Louis 

'"''>)we, Charlotte F McLean Bloomington 

itohens, Florence Ethel H Greene White Hall 

]th, Margaret Anna N McLean Heyworth 

ixtable, Mamie Gertrude ..K McLean Normal 

7de, Adelia Marie P Champaign Champaign 

zlbert, Annie Laurie B Champaign Gifford 

ish, Iris Honor K Fayette Vandalia 

win, Doris Elaine K McLean Normal 

kson, Esther Faye A Mercer Joy 

kson, Ethel Faye P McLean Normal 

issen, Emma Bernice K Woodford Minonk 

. ffries, Bessie Leota P McLean Bloomington 

^. nsen, Anna Jensine M Livingston Saunemin 

risen, Evelyn N Livingston Flanagan 

Jinson, Ellen Ketchum C Cook Chicago 

IK^ hnson, Grace Margaret M Peoria Mapleton 

rJ pson, Jessie Beatrice K Livingston Pontiac 

hnson, Lela Margaret A McLean Bloomington 

hnson, Nettie Pearl N St. Clair East St. Louis 

nes, Eleanor K Macoupin Virden 

nes, Exie De M Mason Mason City 

nes, Mabel P Mason Mason City 

nes, Mary Eleanor K Macoupin Virden 

Wi rdan, Grace Josephine G Montgomery Harvel 

Of [hen, Charlotte D C LaSalle Streator 

Jigher, Katherine Agatha ..L Will Braidwood 

"^ ar, Mae Elizabeth N Ford Gibson City 

3ller, Edith Augusta H Union Jonesboro 

mnedy, Ruth Mary N Kankakee St. Anne 

mney, Florence Irene O Ford Loda 

mney, Nelle Eulalia B Edgar Paris 

iogh, Nora Mary L McLean Bloomington 

m er, Lola Belle M McLean Ellsworth 

mler Vivadene K McLean Ellsworth 

ser, Jessie Mildred N Sangamon Springfield 

tchens, Dorothy GH (Arkansas) Paragould 

lemoeller, Minnie S F Macoupin Staunton 

)ehn, Mildred K McLean Bloomington 



148 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY P0ST0FFI8 

Kraft, Helen Martha H McLean Norm; 

Krantz, Mary Rose C A Henry ^^enese 

Krughoflf, Cora W K Logan San Jos 

Lacey, Lela Velma A Fulton Ipa\ 

Lamberton, Ruth G Iroquois Lod 

Langdon, Ethel Irene P McLean Holde 

Lange, Lydia N Logan Hartsbur 

La Rosa, Dorothy B Iroquois Led 

Lawson, Blanche Lola H Coles Mattoo 

Leach, Mabel I I Sangamon Williamsvill 

Leach, Pearl Lornie N Macoupin Waggone 

Leitch, Mary Bernice B McLean Bloommgto 

Lewis, Musa Mae B Macoupin nv.-^^ 

Light, Urma Izella K Edgar ^^^5^^ 

Lindsey, Clara Pearl K Madison J^,^^^^?, 

Lippert, Ella Henrietta G St. Clair Bellevill 

Little, Marjorie Emma K McLean Norm: 

Lloyd, Nellie Manila B Sangamon Cantra 

Logan, Greba Theone G Tazewell Peki 

Longbrake, Alice Marion P Knox Galesbur 

Lumsden, Elizabeth N Champaign Champaig 

McCaleb, Myrta Emma L Macon Decatu 

McCauley, Vivian Trone K \ ermilion Hoopesto 

McCoy, Marie Kathryn A Marshall NVenon 

McDaniel, Anna Christine ...A McLean Bloommgto 

McDonald, Bessie Marie M Livingston Portia 

McDonald, Loretta Angela . . M Livingston Ponti8 

McDowell, Chrissie M B McLean Normf 

McDowell, Edna Lucile K Kane Auror 

McDowell, Florence Mae C Tazewell Delaya 

McGinnis, Verna B Will Jo h; 

Mclntyre, Cora May L Mercer \\';C"' n }. 

McKean, Myrtle B Bond Mulberry Gro^ 

McKinney, Mae Jennie P McLean ..9^^l^ 

McMahan, Ethel Lena K Morgan Waverl 

McPartlin, Margaret A C Will Jolie 

McWilliams, Dorothe B Woodford • . . . LlPas 

Maloney, Mary Anna P McLean Bloommgto 

Manchester, Margaret K McLean Nornu 

Manford, Ruth D Champaign Champaig 

Marrs, Bessie ^ • • • '4 J^^®^^^® ! l^l] 

Marrs, Margaret Elizabeth . . . A Tazewell Peti 

Martin, Catherine Anna K Vermilion Hoopesto 

Martin, Mabel Eden K Moultrie ^S^^^'^l 

Martins, Pearl Isabel K McLean J^^I^' 

Maxey, Bessie Alberta G Moultrie Bettian 

May, Kathryn A Marshall 'loluc 

Meeker, lola A Douglas AtwoO' 

Meyer, Marie K McLean Bloomingtoi 

Michael, May A DeWitt Farmer Cit; 

Miller, Anna Belle N Tazewell Delava 

Miller, Effie Agnes B Iroquois Onarg 

Miller, Lucille GH McLean Bloomingtoi 

Miller, Mary Anna B Iroquois Onarg- 

Milstead, Venah Beatrice K McLean ^o™^ 

Mitchell, Helen Marie C Macoupin V iraei 

Mitchell, Pearl K Macoupin v irdei 

Moberly, Osee Lucille C DeWitt Farmer Cit. 

Moon, Hazel LaRue K McLean Towana; 

Morris, Myrtle Elizabeth . . . GH White .t^^^"^ 

Mortimer, Flo Vera McLean ^?J^^^ 

Moser, Helen RosaHe B Macon Macoi 



1 

I 



Illinois State Normal University 149 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

[OSes, Cleda Virginia K McLean Normal 

[oulic, Bernice Elsie B McLean Bloomington 

iullikin, Bessie Ellen B Sangamon Illiopolis 

lunch, Twilla Fern M DeWitt Weldon 

lurdie, Zeta Jeannette N Will Manhattan 

lurphy, Hester Mae H Cass Ghandlerville 

iurphy, Marguerite GH Moultrie Sullivan 

:urphy, Mildred Evelyn B Christian Assumption 

lurray, Ruth Ellen L Iroquois Cissna Park 

[lyers, Vivian Lydia G Marion Centralia 

laffziger, Jennie Faye P McLean Stanford 

lafziger, Pearl Ina A McLean Danvers 

jantz, Sophia Louise N Macoupin Carlinville 

eal, Lyla Opal McLean Leroy 

teeld, Phyllis Hull P McLean Bloomington 

lelson, Dora Louise K Menard Petersburg 

elson, Edith Pauline K Henry Kewanee 

leville, Sara Cecelia J McLean Bloomington 

lewman, Amy Marie B Henry Woodhull 

Pewman, Ida Belle P (Missouri) Bunceton 

)vack, Rose Cecilia F Putnam Granville 

'Brien, Margaret Mary L McLean Bloomington 

jgilvie, Helen K Fayette Ramsey 

mara Marguerite Lucile ...J McLean Hudson 

Idaker, Ethel May J Logan Atlanta 

jliver, May Ethel M Will Peotone 

'endorff, Irene P McLean Bloomington 

|ster, Marie E H Woodford ElPaso 

iwens, Bernice Russell G Christian Pana 

jankonin, Adela E B (Wisconsin) Edgar 

•ks, Maurine DF McLean Leroy 

Itarrish, Lura Merle P Vermilion Oakwood 

irtridge, Rena Daisy K Henry Kewanee 

itterson, Nellie Mae N DeWitt Farmer City 

lull, Julia Ann C Crawford Palestine 

ieke, Stella Louise K McLean Bloomington 

jrry, Sara Barzania K McLean Normal 

iterson, Thalia Lucille ... .A Kankakee Momence 

lillipp, Esther Margaret . . .K McLean Normal 

lillips, Aline Louise F McLean Normal 

Ihillips, Helen Maie B Macon Illiopolis 

md, June Bee H Morgan Murrayville 

)rter, Nellie F McLean Leroy 

)tter, Minnie Leah A Macon Warrensburg 

'ather, Charlotte A M Sangamon Custer 

^eston, Zelma Catherine B Ford Gibson Citv 

'ice, Ruby Ellen A Sangamon Glenarm 

'iest, Ida Winifred GH Morgan Jacksonville 

ingle, Helen Smith K McLean Normal 

•ivott, Ethyle Josephine ...J Champaign Champaign 

poctor, Tessie Evelyn A Marshall Toluca 

url, Callie May K Greene Carrollton 

juayle, Edith Vivian M Marion Vernon 

juayle, Eunice Helen N Marion Vernon 

imsay, Merrill May J Macoupin Virden 

imsey, Flossie Priscilla B Livingston Fairbury 

imshaw, Pearl Irene B P^ord Loda 

mdall, Daisy Mae B McLean Bloomington 

laolph, Mary Cornelia F Iroquois Onarga 

ley, Verna Mae K McLean Arrowsmith 

lynor, Minnie Jane G Bureau Ohio 

eed, Elsie Ann G Morgan Jacksonville 



150 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



1 



NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Reeder, Mayme M Champaign Dewey 

Reichel, Bessie May Yiolet . . . G Peoria Peoria 

Reichel, Esther Leota F Peoria Peoria 

Rettig, Wilhelmina H K Shelby Moweaqua 

Reynolds, Gladys Racine L Greene Kane 

Richardson, Darly A St. Clair Richardson 

Rittenhouse, Vera Ruth M Livingston Cullom 

Rodman, Margaret Louise . . . G McLean Normal 

Roney, Laura Ellen H Moultrie Bethany 

Rosenberger, Beulah Gladys . .K Cass Beardstown 

Rosenow, Anna Marie M Bureau Princeton 

Ross, Mildred Georgena K McLean Bloomington 

Roudybush, Gertrude May . . . M Iroquois Woodland 

Ruben, Tillie M Logan Emden 

Ruck, Marie Frances N McLean Normal 

Rudolph, Jessie May G Mason Havana 

Ruehl, Mary Ottilia G Livingston Chatsworth 

Ryburn, Hazel Elizabeth . . . GH McLean Heyworth 

Sadler, Clella Lewis B McLean Normal 

Sadler, Lena J Christian Grove City 

Sarver, Lenna Faye N Fayette Herrick 

Schaeffer, Esther H Richland Olney 

Schafer, Bernice Louise H Putnam Granville 

Schoop, Irma Louise B Will Joliet 

Scheffler, Emma Alice P Sangamon Springfield 

Schilb, Imongo Lowell A St. Clair East St. Louis 

Schlabach, Mildred Ethlyn . . .K McLean Normal 

Schott, Meta P Kankakee Reddick 

Schrock, Fern Lueltha C Livingston Chatsworth' 

Schroeder, Hilda Kathryn ..M Will Manhattan 

Schureman, Mabel Love K McLean Saybrook 

Scott, Delia Irene K Edgar Chrisman 

Scott, Emma Elizabeth H Morgan Franklin 

Scott, Henrietta Evelyn A (Kentucky) Erlangei 

Scott, Lillian Mae N McLean Bloomington 

Searles, Martha Lillian . . . GH Kankakee Momence 

Secor, Blanche G Greene CarroUton 

Secretan, Helen Bertha B Peoria Peoria 

Seib, Edna Dorothy M St. Clair Millstadt 

Seright, Mary Marguerite .. .K Livingston Chatsworth 

Sessions, Romaine K Cook Chicago 

Shaner, Hazel Verda K Henry Galv? 

Sharp, Fern Lora K McDonough Blandinsville 

Sheets, Tressie Mae P McLean Bloomingtor 

Sheldon, Winifred Alice K Bureau Tiskilwa 

Shepherd, Nanna Emeline ...A Livingston Saunemin 

Sherry, Claire D Livingston Flanagan 

Shields, Mary Etta L Logan Atlanta 

Shields, Naomi Elvira N McLean Normal 

Shultz, Esther P McLean Shirley 

Shultz, Frances P McLean Shirley 

Siedentop, Emma Rose A Livingston Ransom 

Simonds, Mary Lora K Kankakee Momence 

Sindlinger, Marvel May D (low^a) Waterloo 

Skinner, Elsie Elizabeth McLean Normal 

Sleezer, Marcia Adella L Ford Paxton 

Slonaker, Leta Vivian L McLean Bloomington 

Smith, Alice Marie G Moultrie Bethany 

Smith. Charlotte Lois F McLean Normal 

Smith, Clara N Stark Toulon 

Smith, Edna F Tazewell Tremont 

Smith, Elsie Henrietta P Mason Topeka 



Illinois State Normal University 151 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOPFIS 

Smith, Ethel Mary B Vermilion Georgetown 

Smith, Leta Frances K (Wisconsin) Marinette 

Smith, Mary Ethel B Vermilion Georgetown 

Smith, Mildred Elizabeth P Moultrie Bethany 

iJBmith, Nina Juanita P Pike Louisiana 

smith, Ruth Esperance M Tazewell Morton 

Smith, Ruth Esther G Lawrence Sumner 

5nyder, Florence Saline G Alexander Cairo 

;perry, Alice Ruth K Tazewell Mackinaw 

)picer, Velma Verna N Macoupin Waggoner 

Jtahl, Alice Ursula H Cook Chicago 

Jtahl, Ethel Gertrude F Madison Alton 

Jtaley, Lucile B Christian Pana 

"Stanger, Lois Reeves B McLean Normal 

Stansell, Verna May K Putnam Magnolia 

Stanton, Helen Marie B Putnam Hennepin 

Starling, Bernice A McLean Bloomington 

Steinke, Helen Anna L McLean Randolph 

Stephen, Elizabeth L Vermilion Danville 

Stewart, Alice L McLean Normal 

Stewart, Julia Evans P McLean Randolph 

Stewart, Mary Louise K McLean Randolph 

Stewart, Olive P Peoria Princeville 

Stewart, Ruth Madeline B McLean Bloomington 

Street, Ruby Elizabeth G St. Clair East St. Louis 

Stroman, Mary Ethel B Fulton Fairview 

Stuart, Ruth Catherine K McLean Normal 

Summers, Edith Louise K McLean Bloomington 

Sutton, Lucile K McLean Normal 

Swan, Grace Vernelle K Champaign Champaign 

Sweeney, Joanna T M McLean Bloomington 

Sweet, Mrs. Myrna Helen N Madison Upper Alton 

Tappe, Agnes Theresa P Stephenson Freeport 

Tappe, Maysie Louvina C McLean Bloomington 

Tavenner, Jennie Blanche . .GH McLean McLean 

Tee, Vivienne Harriett G McLean Bloomington 

Thomas, Elizabeth F Ford Paxton 

Thomas, Lois Harriet H Mason Havana 

Thompson, Ednah Sadie D McLean Bloomington 

Thompson, Helen Louise N McLean Randolph 

Thompson, Maude Ethel G McLean Bloomington 

Thorn, Julia Allen C Madison Alton 

Thornley, Edna Etta N Logan Lincoln 

Thorpe, Mrs. Laura L DeWitt Wapella 

Tobias, Hazel Delia F McLean Normal 

Torrens, Jessie Alice C St. Clair Marissa 

Tortat, Iva Eulalia K McLean Normal 

Travis, Gladys Elizabeth N Livingston Fairbury 

Trott, Veda Elmira A McLean Stanford 

Turner, Fannie Virginia B (Ohio) Zanesville 

Turner, Lurel Serena B Mason Havana 

Turney, Dorothy A Sangamon Springfield 

Vance, Agnes Margaret B McLean Danvers 

Vandervort, Onieta P McLean Normal 

Van Hook, Nelly L McLean Normal 

Vannier, La Belle Mercedes . .K Scott Bluffs 

Van Petten, Dorothy E D McLean Bloomington 

Veech, Irma Dorcas A Macon Oakley 

Vice, Stella L Edgar Chrisman 

Vogel, Elizabeth Marie A Woodford Benson 

Wakeland, Lucy Mildred L Iroquois Hoopeston 

Wakeland, Winifred G B Iroquois Hoopeston 



152 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



I 



NAME SECTION COUNTY P0ST0FFI8 

Walden, Ada Mae K Logan Burton View 

Walker, Mabel Bernice D Moultrie Bethany 

Wall, Theresa Cecilia L McLean Colfax 

Wallace, Harriett Marie P McLean Holder 

Walsh, Anna Lucretia B Livingston Campus 

Waltmire, Luverne Scott K Tazewell Green Valley- 
Ward, Fairby Doris N McLean Colfax 

Waterbury, Marian I B Ogle Polo 

Watkins, Lucy Ryburn GH McLean Bloomington 

Watts, Sylvia HoUey B Marion Centralia 

Weekly, Mrs. Ora B L McLean Bloomington 

Welchlen, Maudella Grace . . .N McLean Shirley 

Welsh, Mrs. Katherine H K Knox Williamsfieid 

Wells, Frances G Greene Carrollton 

Wenger, Mabel J Madison Highland 

Wente, Cordula Dorothy K Will Crete 

Wessels, Letha Jean P Iroquois Crescent City 

Wheeler, Ruth P Marion Patoka 

Wheeler, Stella Mae B Johnson Vienna 

White, Anna Gratia GH McLean Normal 

White, Justina Aurelia K McLean Bloomington 

Wibbenhost, Verna M M Livingston Cornell 

Widdows, Nellie Lucille GH Douglas Newman 

Wiley, Lillian Frances C McLean Normal 

Wiley, Ruth DF McLean Normal 

Williams, Vesta Olive H Greene Kane 

Wilson, Bertha M Logan Beason 

Wilson, Effle Mae C Peoria Dunlap 

Wilson, Florence Lucile M Winnebago Rockford 

Wilson, Hannah Lenore A Livingston Pontiac 

Wilson, Mrs. Pearl B P McLean Normal 

Winans, Mildred Opal N Woodford Minonk 

Winch, Marie Virginia L Sangamon Springfield 

Winchel, Glyde GH Shelby Moweaqua 

Winchell, Helen Lucile L xMcLean Normal 

Winegarner, Hazel Merret ..K Macon Decatur 

Winegarner, Lela Fay P Macon Decatur 

Wmtz, Esther Anna L McLean Bloomington 

Wiseman, Laura K Jasper, Willow Hill 

Wood, Ruth Arvella N McLean Normal 

Woodside, Ruth K (Massachusetts) . Chicopee Falls 

Woolard, Claudia B B Saline Galatia 

Worley, Cesta Olive O Sangamon Illiopolis 

Wyant, Leta Bernice K Henry Kewanee 

Wylhe, Marion Maude N Livingston Emington 

Wynd, Florence A Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Wysong, Gertrude B Macon Maroa 

Yates, Mildred Gertrude N Peoria Peoria 

Young, Irma Marguerite C McLean Normal 

Youngblood, Mabel C L McLean Normal 

Zenor, Faye Marie L McLean Bloomington 

Zimmerman, Frances K Newton Jasper 

Albee, Erwin E McLean Bloomington 

Alexander, Eugene E J McLean Bloomington 

Baltz, Harvey Richard M St. Clair Millstadt 

Barr, Walter Lee P Vermilion Sidell 

Beckman, Frederick F K McLean Bloomington 

Bennett, Earl P Tazewell Delavan 

Bmnion, Forrest William K McLean Normal 

Bivm, Ray Lestor I Macoupin Palmyra 

Blackmore, Raymond P Ford Gibson City 

Boughton, Roy P McLean Hudson 



Illinois State Normal University 153 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

5oyd, Ora Len A Champaign Foosland 

Jrethorst, Marion Arnold . . . M Ford Sibley 

Jrokaw, John P McLean Bloomington 

Jrown, Walter Sterry J McLean Bloomington 

Jryant, Howard Isaac K McLean Towanda 

Jush, Eli Ward N Will Mokena 

iyerly, Oliver Clarence M Logan Elkhart 

:alhoun, Howard Verne K Marshall Wenona 

lanopy, Williard Brannan . . .L Tazewell Hopedale 

larlson, Carl Frederick K Champaign Gifford 

larnahan, Harry Burton M Logan Emden 

:hapman, Harold Isaac P LaSalle Marseilles 

London, Robert Schofield E McLean Bloomington 

hooper, William COllison P Scott Manchester 

Copper, Raymond Luther J Mason Mason City 

^ourtright, Dudley Clark E McLean Normal 

::ourtright, James Lyle E McLean Normal 

Crosby, Frank Jacob J McLean Normal 

Crouch, Carl George P McLean Normal 

)anneberger, Charles L Shelby ShelbyviUe 

)avis, Paul Jefferson K Champaign Urbana 

)eutsch, Harry Lincoln E McLean Bloomington 

Dillon, Elmo K McLean Bloomington 

Dowdall, Leven Marwood E Greene CarroUton 

)unne, John Jerome K LaSalle Tonica 

i^lliott, Clifford Elzie E McLean Lexington 

5ngel, Byron Estill K McLean Colfax 

]:nnis, Andrew Earl K Montgomery Pa\Miee 

^vans, George Tryner K McLean Bloomington 

^"^agan, William Sweeney P McLean Bloomington 

^eek, John Lester F Ford Elliott 

^innegan, Thomas Leo E Putnam Putnam 

^roebe, Milton Edwin K Logan San Jose 

jarman, Arthur Lee J McLean Normal 

jillis, Hallie Hadley E McLean Bloomington 

jilmore, Chalmers Jack J McLean Saybrook 

ioddard, Clyde N Jefferson Belle Rive 

TOlden, Robert Edwin N Tazewell Manito 

jrav, Francis K Christian Blue Mound 

jrider, Glenn Adolphus I Greene Athensville 

jriser, Norman E McLean Normal 

auenther, Otto Hugo P McLean Normal 

laines, Robert Emmett K McLean Normal 

Sanson, Archie E E McLean Normal 

largitt, George Merton K McLean Normal 

larsy, George William J Monroe Burksville 

layes, John Leo K McLean Bloomington 

ledrick, Leonard Cecil L Edwards Parkersburg 

aelander, Milton W P LaSalle Wenona 

hempen, Fred John L Clinton Carlyle 

aerriott, Herschel K McLean Normal 

Jertel, Louis John St. Clair Millstadt 

3ill, Fred A E McLean Lexington 

^oierman, Paul Herbert I McLean Bloomington 

Jollimon, Lawrence Porter ..0 St. Clair East St. Louis 

hoover, Willard Arthur P McLean Bloomington 

lostettler, Tony Clovous L Richland Calhoun 

:iufrington, Paul K McLean Normal 

iulTman, Robert Benjamin ..P (South Dakota) Pierre 

rlylbert, Herbert I Champaign Gifford 

Ingersoll, Vernice P Tazewell Green Valley 

Fackson, Ervin L Lawrence Lawrenceville 

^ensen, Harry Warner P McLean Heyworth 



154 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME SECTION COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Johnson, Gayle Glen P Pope Golcondai 

Johnston, G. Melville I Hancock Warsaw' 

Jones, Kenneth K McLean Normal 

Julian, Norvin N P Pope Raum 

Junk, Cedric Thomas K ( (Missouri) Dexter 

Justus, Paul Kilbride I Fulton Ipava 

Kelso, Raymond William P (Canada) Calgary 

Kirkman, Wayne K DeWitt Farmer City 

Knuppel, Fred John M Mason Easton 

Koch, Merle Stanley N Adams Liberty 

Kramer, Arthur Elmer K Logan Emden 

Lamkin, Clyde E L Piatt Emden 

Lathrop, Levi K Lawrence Sumner 

Livingston, Samuel K Madison Edwardsville 

Lutz, Franklin Harold L McLean Bloomington 

McConnell, Estle Marion K Hancock Warsaw 

McGee, Estey P Clay Louisville 

McMahon, Edward George I Bureau Tiskilwa 

McTaggart, Clarence Glen E Christian Pana 

McWherter, Paul K K McLean Normal 

Means, Raymond Ross K McLean Saybrook 

Medford, Charles Edward E Macon Decatur 

Milstead, Harley Porter L McLean Normal 

Mortimer, Raymond N McLean ' Normal 

Munch, Nelson Harry E Moultrie Lovington 

Nelson, Gilbert Demorest K McLean Bloomington 

Newhauser, Rutherford B. . . .E McLean Normal 

Nolder, Clarence E J Tazewell Hopedale 

Norris, Lynn Adair L Macon Maroa 

Orendorff, Allen Glenn P McLean Bloomington 

Orendorff, Lloyd Elmo P McLean Bloomington 

Owens, Harry James L Macoupin Carlinville 

Packard, Carroll Dwight L McLean Normal 

Perry, Charles William J McLean Normal 

Perry, Elbert Lawrence E McLean Normal 

Pfiffner, Floyd Marten J Peoria Peoria 

Price, Leslie Wayne N Lawrence St. Francisville 

Quick, Chester Allen L Lawrence St. Francisville 

Raycraft, Thomas Benjamin . .1 McLean Normal 

Rayl, Harry J Champaign Broadlands 

Rebbe, Alfred E Randolph Chester 

Reddick, Glenn Scott M McLean Arrowsmith 

Reichling, Walter Edward . . .N St. Clair Millstadt 

Ricketts, Louis Edward N Livingston Campus 

Rieck, Earl Meier K McLean Normal 

Rittenhouse, Paul N Livingston Cullom 

Ritter, Floyd K McLean Normal 

Roche, John William K Piatt Bement 

Rogers, Earl I Knox Yates City 

Rogers, James Travis P McLean Normal 

Sanford, Robert Stillson K McLean Normal 

Sanmann, Frank Paul E Mason Havana 

Sarff, Oran P Cass Beardstown 

Schofield, Roy K Morgan Waverly 

Scott, Herschel Newton K Montgomery Raymond 

Senseney, Ferdinand Louis . .K McLean Normal 

Shibe, Ray Carlton L Scott Winchester 

Shick, Ralph Andrew L Lawrence St. Francisville 

Simer, Dorr Miller P Piatt Cisco 

Smith, Carl Ross I McLean Normal 

Stahlheber, John Elmer E Monroe Hecker 

Stewart, Bradford K McLean Normal 



Illinois State Normal University 



155 



^^^^m NAME SECTION 

j!«i*iitewart, George P 

?W§tewart, Harry Edward K 

T'" Story, Claire Franklin E 

^ ;Tallyn, Chester Arthur E 

"f^^ iTatman, Horton Edward E 

m Taubeneck, Otto Clark N 

m I Thompson, Charles Albert ...E 

r Ci I Thompson, Lee E E 

f^ft< :Tice, William Gilbert K 

Uliei iTobias, Howard Arthur E 

m iVoigt, John Christopher I 

Jill I'Walton, Henry Harrison L 

f^ ;• Watson, Lynn Robinson I 

¥ [Westhoff, Frank W L 

fik iWhitcomb, Donald D E 

m i. Whitmore, LeRoy A K 

Mviip Wiggle, G. E E 

Wilson, Donald H J 

Wilson, Ralph K 

Wirth, Edward Henry O 

Yeck, Carl Alfred J 

Zellhoefer, Glenn Faber K 

Ziemer, William Henry L 

Zimmerman, Frank C I 



COUNTY 



POSTOFPIS 






iogta 



Christian Tovey 

Stephenson Freeport 

McLean Leroy 

Woodford Benson 

McLean Normal 

Clark Marshall 

McLean Saybrook 

McLean Saybrook 

Madison Godfrey 

McLean Normal 

Kankakee Kankakee 

Macoupin Carlinville 

McLean Norm.al 

McLean Normal 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

Vermilion Catlin 

McLean Normal 

St. Clair Waterloo 

Woodford Roanoke 

McLean Leroy 

Effingham Dieterich 

Macoupin Bunker Hill 



LIST OF STUDENTS IN THE MID-SPRING TERM, 1917 



NAME 



COUNTY 



POSTOFFIS 



Abbott,. Amy C Champaign Mahomet 



. 



^01 

<oriiii 
Peori 
ml 
ml 
im 
M 



Macon Decatur 

Clay Edgewood 

Piatt Mansfield 

Birkett, Alice Tazewell Washington 



Allen, Lena May 
Allen, Zella 0. 
Betts, Rilda 



arapi 
(on 

lom 
temei 

ioi 
ioma 

m 



McLean Colfax 

McLean Cooksville 

Macon Decatur 

Pike Pleasant Hill 

Logan Atlanta 

Menard Greenview 

Adams Quincy 

Tazewell Pekin 

Shelby Moweaqua 

Jersey Alton 

McLean Downs 

Livingston D wight 

Ford Gibson City 

Iroquois Sheldon 

Ford Gibson City 

Livingston Fairbury 

McLean Heyworth 

McLean Normal 

Greene Roodhouse 

Moultrie Dalton City 

Tazewell Hopedale 

Knox Williamsfield 

Livingston Long Point 

Champaign Dewey 

Cousins, Agnes E Madison Upper Alton 

Dalrymple, Dora Belle Edgar Chrisman 

Davis, Mrs. Cora Mitchell Moultrie Bethany 

Davis, Eula Alice Shelby Moweaqua 



Blair, Edith Letha 
Blossom, Mrs. Lucy Ella 
Bonner, Bessie Elizabeth 

Bower, Ruth 

Bowers, Mrs, Edith 

Bradley, Marie E 

Bredeweg, Alma E 

Brereton, Katherine M. . 
Brown, Edith Morrell . . . 

Brown, Elsie 

Brown, Iris Lucile 

Buehler, Ida Ruth 

Buesing, Marguerite 

Burch, Elma Le Nore . . . 
Busing, Sophia Allieda . 
Campbell, Grace Virginia 

Caterlin, Opha 

Chism, Mrs. Ida Belle . . . 

Clark, Ethel 

Clark, Nancy Annis 

Gogdal, Elsie 

Cole, Una Mary 

Coleman, Ilda Ruby 

Condit, Lois A 



156 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

DeHass, Minnie Bloudel Logan Beasoil 

Dexter, Bernice Ethelwynn Livingston Fairbur 

Donovan, Grace M Will Jolii 

5i^T' Margaret Louise Pike PittsfleL 

Edel, Yelda McLean Cooksvill! 

Lnnis, Frances Lillian Montgomery PawneJ 

Ennis, Mmnie Elizabeth Montgomery Pawne 

Ennis, Myrtle Beatrice Montgomery PawneJ 

Estes, Pansy Audrey Edgar Kansal 

Evans, Chatt Marie Scott Winchestei 

Exter, Margaret Ruth St. Clair FreeburJ 

Farrell, Nelle Ardath Edgar Chrismai 

Firth, Gladys Tazewell Green Valle^ 

Fisher, Nora B McLean Downi 

Fraher, Ethel Mary Livingston Cullon 

JB reed, Lydia Maysel Moultrie Lovingtoi 

French, Carrie Velma Bureau Budf 

Gaul, Maude DeWitt Kennej 

George, Caroline Rebecca Christian Breckenridg( 

Gerrietts, Freda Mason Forest Citj 

Golze, Lillian Alice Macon Decatui 

Goodwin, Viva May Macon Decatui 

Hageman, Charlotte Jersey Otterville 

Hamlme, Eva Beatrice Tazewell Armingtor 

Halhday, Stella Eulalia McLean Bellflowei 

Hannum, Margaret Lucile Marshall Wenona 

Hartley, Minnie Olga Sangamon Buffalo Harl 

Haynes, Frances Brown Peoria Peoria 

Hess, Lemira G Logan Lincoln 

Hillerman, Mary Permelia Sangamon Springfield 

Holt, Mrs. Laura McCoy Hamilton Dahlgren 

Hubbart, Ruth Frances Piatt Monticello 

Huber, Helen Clara Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Jacobs, Zelma Elsie Macon Decatur 

Jaeger, Katherine Barbara Peoria Glasford 

Johnson, Ellen Ford Paxton 

Johnson, Grace Pearl McLean Stanford 

Judy, Mrs. Verna Watt Tazewell Armington 

Kelley, Verna Vermilion Henning 

Kelly, Mae Rose Marshall Toluca 

Kennedy, Blanche McLean Normal 

Kidwell, Carrie McLean Shirley 

King, Blanche Montgomery Irving 

Knobeloch, Anna Louise McLean Bloomington 

Knowles, Maude Marie Macon Elwin 

Kritz, Laura Katherine Calhoun Batchtown 

Lee, Grace Alene McLean Stanford 

Lmn, Leota Christian Mt. Auburn 

Litherland, Lenora May Wabash Allendale 

Lyons, Margaret J Woodford ElPaso 

McCullough, Jessie Benton . . . Macon Decatur 

McDonald, Sarah Adele Madison Dorsey 

McKenney, Lillian Mae Calhoun Golden Eagle 

Malone, Mary Vermilion Potomac 

Maloy, Feme Mary Logan Hartsburg 

Metzger, Dewey Pearl Piatt Bement 

Miller, Sadie Florence Christian Owaneco 

Mize, Nellie Rose Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Morrissey, Josephine Leta Piatt Galesvilie 

Mullinix, Mrs. Hattie Moultrie Bethany 

Myers, Josephine Anita Livingston Fairbury 

Nafziger, Wanita Tazewell Mackinaw i 



Illinois State Normal University 



157 



POSTOFFIS 



NAME COUNTY 

olas, Edith Etha Jasper West Liberty 

olas,Leah^May_^ I^atn"' //////////////. 0"^!? 



Richland Dundas 

key, Anna Bernice Macon Oakley 

igaldin, Judith Seraphme . . . .Calhoun Hard m 



^nor, Minnie 

}der, Mayme 

ider, Ruth Elizabeth 

10, Mary Louise . . . 

jads, Edith Evelyn 

jhards, Beryl Edna . 

jhards, Carrie E. . . . 

)erts, Ruth Carolyn 

)inson, Marie 

), Alethea Dagbar . . 
igers, Mary Ethel . . . 

arff, Eula 

haw, Helen Geneva . . 
hively, Fleta Ferol . . 
imon, Anna Rachel . . 

Dangle, Eva G 

pangle, Gladys 

pringer, Mary E 

tandley, Beatrice Irene 



Bureau Ohio 

Champaign Dewey 

. . Scott Winchester 

Macoupin Medora 

Macoupin Medora 

Douglas Tuscola 

Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Pike Pittsfield 

*.;!*.! Woodford Eureka 

Lee Franklin Grove 

; ; ; ; ^FrankHn Ewing 

Tazewell Pekm 

...Menard Athens 

.... Macon Decatur 

..;.. Calhoun Batchtown 

Jersey Jerseyville 

Jersey Jerseyville 

..McLean Stanford 

.Morgan Chapm 

UrV7cathe7ine^Clarr:. :::.... (Vermont . South Londonderry 

tokes, Margaret Clinton Fnrmpr fitv 

wigart, Beulah Hope B^)^'^^ pinnmTnSon 

alcott, Clara May f ^^^^r * ?^i«^nla 

aylor, Mary P X^wuV °^ rtnton 

homas, Adda Mae S^^^^^ 'wa^innpr 

homas Mary Edna Montgomery ^^r^Wnn 

. homas Nettie Edna DeWitt 'i^nri^ r^?v 

homas, Susie Catherine Mason ^^"^p.wnH 

an Geison, Florence Minta ....Montgomery ••• — ••-• ^,^^^3 

/allace, Anna F/^^^^^'^ ^®^^ ^NnVnm i« 

/alton, Clara Grace Montgomery ^""t^'t 

/hitlock, Myrtle Jeanette Montgomery . •••••••;••• f^^mg 

/illber, Frances Lawrence Vincennes (Ind^ 

. /ilson, Hester Fulton ^Vn'JZ 

/cods, Gussie Jewel Oreene TiHnnnii^ 

/right, Deborah J ?,?^PT'' Mf r^?mii 

Icorn, John MitcheH Wabash ^3 M^^n^?^ 

aphr Hpnrv P Clinton New Memphis 

vtlrks? JeffeS)n SewelY ! ! .' ! 1 1 1 1 ! Macon ^^^"r^J^^;!^ 

rfione, Harrie Lee Moultrie ^t^pnn 

Tookshire, Atwill Macon p'fpMnwn 

anan, Edward John Ca houn r^J^^MoZ 

anan, John Patrick Calhoun ?^[fi' r^p 

arlton, Richard Everett Jefferson Belle Rive 



Champaign Homer 

Shelby Herrick 

' * ' * Perry Swanwick 

Fayette Brownstown 

Menard Greenview 

Fayette Vandalia 

McLean Bloommgton 

.... ..ac. ..cy * : ; 'Shelby J^Si™^ 

olt; Lawrence J. ' ! '. Hamilton RSH^ifrfr?? 

•eland Guv . I^awrence Bridgeport 

m, William* ¥.' ::;::::::.. : . . wayne '^^^lf;fP^Xilv 

f'Tntyre, Lawrence Perry e^ni'^Q^'Tni 

iller, Charles Howard Clay Sailor Springs 

illman, Lewis (England) London 



urrent, Seymer Milton . . . 

tobbs, Thomas Wiley 

rnest, Robert Benjamin . . 
roen, Arthur Hennick . . . 

ibbs, Adam 

icks, Blueford 

ollimon, Lawrence Porter 
olt, Isaac Ray 



158 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPFIJ 

Mills, Telia Brewer Lawrence Ghauinv 

Price, Charles Ernest Jasper New i 

Price, George Hulbert Wabash Mt Carrol 

Pyatt,^Roy Fayette St El? 

Roberts, Earl Frank Knox Abingci 

Robinson, Robert Johnson Iroquois .' * * " Giliri 

Shull, Jesse Macoupin '. Virca 

Shumard, Virgil Austin Jasper Newift 

Smith, Willis Erastus Jefferson Belle r! 

Wones, Edward Martin Macoupin Girj'l 

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS, 1916 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFPU 

Aaron, Mamie Livingston Stra 

Aber, Sada .. Pike Pittsfi, 

Adams, Mrs. Anita JoDaviess Apple Ri^ 

Adams, Maude Peoria Elmwc 

Adamson, Amanda Richland Olr 

Adkinson, Dorothy (Kentucky) Carrolll 

Adlington, Gwendolyn F Ford Meb 

Ahne, Anna St. Clair Millsti 

Ahrens, Ina C Livingston Oq 

Ahrens, Lillian Woodford Metamt 

4!5^^' Faye Douglas Newix 

Albright, Norma Aline McLean Norii 

Aidrich, Edna Elizabeth Mason Tehei 

Aldrich, Emma A Mason TeheB 

Alexander, Edith M Madison Madis 

Alexander, Eleanor L Macoupin Bunker h 

Alexander, Elsie Vadna Christian Tayiorvi 

Alexander, Portia McLean Bloomingi 

Allen, Mrs. Ella Macoupin Barn 

Allen, Frances Bureau Princel 

Allgaier, Anna Massac Metropo 

Allison, Bessie I Menard Greenvii 

Allison, Eleanor Grundy Gardt 

Allison, Oma M Christian Assumpt: 

Alsbury, Mary Elizabeth Macon Maj 

Alsbury, Rebecca A Macon Mai 

Altman, Lulu Mason Said( 

Altman, Millicent Madison Collinsvi 

Ames, Audria Marie Vermilion BismaL 

Amidon, Adeline Kankakee Herscfe 

Amos, Lydia Alexander Ca; 

Andereck, Hazel Marion Sanded 

Anderson, Augusta Peoria Peoi 

Anderson, Beatrice Grundy Stockdi 

Anderson, Mrs. Ella Goodner ...McLean Nornf 

Anderson, Ella S Iroquois Milfcl 

Anderson, Eva June Tazewell Delavi 

Anderson, Hazel Putnam McNa) 

Anderson, Helen Irene Will Jolt 

Anderson, Irene Nannie Tazewell Delavi 

Anderson, Isabelle Knox Oneii 

Anderson, Lillian McLean Nornl 

Anderson, Mary Belle McLean Hole: 

Anderson, Nellie Elizabeth Iroquois Ashkii 

Andrew, Feme Iva McLean Heywon 

Ank, Marie Carroll Mt. Carrl 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 



159 



NAME 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

jffast Leila DeWitt Farmer City 

iibalS, Charity St. Clair Freeburg 

Ids, Anna M Ford Melvm 

jtt, Dorothy Grace McLean Normal 

lid Mrs. lone Montgomery Donnellson 

jld Ruby Rebekka Fayette Brownstown 

Ington, Bertha A Macon Jf^^°^ 

ngton, Edna Yiola Macon.......... 'J}ZZ^ 

izman, Hulda Randolph Chester 

igspurger, Pearl Eunice Ford ^^^f °^ ^^^^ 

It Vida Kankakee Momence 

stin Hettie . *. Pope Golconda 

stin; Lois Merrill McLean Bloomington 

. istmkn, Nathalia E Livingston ^?'L'2?i 

•ey, Blanche McLean Leroy 

^ling, Mildred Peoria Peoria 

ir/^, Snn.e-:::::::::::::.« v:--.:v.:::vz^ 
^S^, '^. :::::::::::: :|n ••.;.•••.•••.•.•••.•.•.• go^o||^ 

liley, Estella Mae Champaign Nnfmn^ 

dley, Florence Caroline McLean ^Z^T^ 

lilpv Frances McLean i^9^?^^l 

ev Mary . Washington Oakdale 

liUe Edna .:. Christian Owaneco 

lily,' Charline H Livingston IfwnJ!^ 

drd Hazelle Electa McLean ^Nn/ma1 

tird Louise E McLean Norma 

drd, Mae Belle McLean w°pSw 

lird Margie Hancock Warsaw 

Iker, cirfie eV ! ! ! McLean ^'To'n^f'Rv 

ikpr Emily V Lake /ion City 

ISEthef.;: Tazewell Delavan 

iker, Louvena L McLean Normal 

ikpr Stella LaSalle btreaior 

Iderston Jeannette Putnam Magnolia 

lief Ruby .^;;.^-- -Hamilton McLeansboro 

tU, Hazel Marguerite Logan Hpnrv 

dleweg, Violet ^.^l',^^l^ otnp? 

Iilmer, Margaret Anna Richland T^Vlnrvnle 
mgert, Mae Christian ^""^IwVip 
inks, Marie Livingston Z\^lvl 

iptist, Elsie Macoupm ^r^l\l 

„irkley, Emma Elizabeth ^h^.^o^ T;vinrvil p 

#rnes,Maida Christian ^M^lnnton 

iiron, Birdella G l^f'T'''^ wnmhlSton 

irr, Catherine Margaret Wi 1 Wilmington 

irth Elsie Williamson ,V®^^^? 

XS .:::.: wooded Mmonk 

irth Sophia Woodford Mmonk 

irtholomew, Ruth Sangamon Virfdfnrd 

irto, Clara M, Bureau ^plotone 

irton, Marjorie Jewel Will • • • Pana 

irtow, Lydia M Christian Oninc? 

iss, Ozela Zenadia Adams -hi;- ^ni?nn 

iuiligart, Dorothea Henrietta . .McLean ^^^'^'^Mnffnn 

Hirer, Anna Tazewell Sm!^ 

;al Azalia Champaign V?.^ i^ 

;ai; Gertrude ,., Woodford Bioomin^Sn 

^am, Lucile McLean ^^^^^^'Sfi^n 

iaman, Virginia R Vermihon feiaell 



160 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPPIS 

Bear, Geraldean Macon Decat 

Beaty, Annabelle Clinton *. .*. Shatt, 

Beck, Vivian Woodford MinoL 

Becker, Ella L Tazewell Pekl 

Beekman, Muriel Montgomery Litchfie 

Beeler, Grayce Stephenson Freepc. 

Beem, Grace Elizabeth Lake Zion Gil 

Beierman, Anna Josephine Montgomery Raymori 

Belay, Marguerite Loretto Will Jolil 

Belsley, Bessie Tazewell Washingtc 

Belsley, Olive Woodford Metamoi 

Bennes, Dora Josephine Madison Altc 

Bennett, Cora Eva Henry Annawa 

Bennett, Ruble Rose Macon Decati 

Bennington, Bernice Marshall LaRoi 

Bennyhoff, Fern Fayette St. EIitj 

Bennyhoff, Ruby Fayette St. Elrri 

Benoit, Angelina Beulah Iroquois Beavervil, 

Bensema, Ida Iroquois Danfort 

Benson, Gertrude DeWitt Weldc 

Benson, Nelle Josephine DeWitt Weldc 

Berg, Elsie McLean Bloomingto 

Bergin, Rose Helen Livingston Campi 

Bertram, Grace I St. Clair Bellevil 

Bertram, May Madison Collinsvil 

Betts, Rilda Piatt Mansfiel 

Bibler, Gladys Faye Kankakee Buckinghai 

Bidle, Grace Adams Quinc 

Bierbower, Mabel Fern McLean Bellflow^ 

Bierbower, Velma Lois McLean Arrowsmit 

Billings, Leta Rae McLean Normi 

Bishop, Virginia Fern Iroquois Cissna Pan 

Bittourna, Hazel Grace Kankakee Kankake 

Black, Effie Dee Hamilton .• McLeansboi 

Black, Hazel May Tazewell Green Valle 

Black, Mabel Isabel LaSalle Grand Ridg 

Black, Minnie Maude Hamilton McLeansbor 

Blackburn, Eunice Rebecca McLean Normi 

Blaha, Lena Madison Collinsvilj 

Blair, Effie A Macon Blue Mouq 

Blair, Grace A Grundy Morr 

Blair, Hazel Oneta McLean Normi 

Blair, Mabel McLean Ellswort, 

Blakeley, Emma Sangamon Rochest^ 

Blakemore, Ida Randolph Spart 

Blazina, Elsie E Marshall Toluc 

Bleiker, Hedwig St. Clair Bellevill 

Bledsoe, Doris Fayette St. Elm 

Blemler, Anna Edith Cass Beardstow"^ 

Bliss, Bertha Elizabeth Peoria Princevill 

Bliss, Mrs. Lois McLean Bloomingto 

Blizzard, Geraldine M Montgomery Irvin 

Bloom, Minnie Peoria Peori 

Bodamer, Desse E Piatt Hammon 

Boehrnsen, Amanda Iroquois Martinto 

Bolds, Violet Fayette St. Elm 

Boley, Bessie Richland Calhou 

Boley, Hattie Ann Richland Olne 

Boling, Caroline Mary Tazewell Hopedal 

Bolton, Margaret Will Jolie 

Boma, Bertha Ford Piper Git; 

Bond, Mildred C McLean Norma 



IP Illinois State Normal University 161 

P NAME COUNTY POSTOPFIS 
Id, Nellie M Tazewell Pekin 

mde, Inger M Putnam McNabb 

me, Camilla Moultrie Bethany 

)nnell, Myrtilla R Fayette Vernon 

mner, Bessie Elizabeth Macon Decatur 

^jok, Mabel Olive Wayne Fairfield 

JBine, Josephine Harriett McLean Normal 

'«!rders, Helen A Vermilion Rossville 

)rn, Margaret Piatt Milmine 

)rtmess, Ina Montgomery Waggoner 

mdinot, Maude Jefferson Belle Rive 

)wen, Louise McLean Bloomington 

)wer, Frances Grundy Gardner 

)wers, Ada Moultrie Lovington 

)wers, Zola Moultrie Lovington 

)wman, Flora Peoria Brimfleld 

)wman, Jennie Isabel Piatt Monticello 

)wman, Leona Florence Macon Decatur 

byd, Mabel Edythe Kankakee Buckingham 

')yd, Mabel Rose Grundy Morris 

lyer, Ruth Fulton Canton 

ijzarth, Imo Irene McLean Gillum 

aden, Emma Pearl Madison Granite City 

adley, Alma Belle Sangamon Illiopolis 

adiey, Veronica Vermilion Hoopeston 

adshaw, Ruth E Livingston Fairbury 

ady, Esther A Bureau Arlington 

all, Evelyn M Peoria Peoria 

ifamley, Freda Macoupin Chesterfield 

pandenberger, Grace Vermilion Danville 

ndt, Dora Sybilla White Carmi 

nom, Bessie L Jersey Jerseyville 

nom, Edna Lucile Morgan Waverly 

peese, Annie Dyfl McLean Lexington 

reese, Rachel G McLean Lexington 

■ennan, L. Marie Sangamon Buffalo 

eenneman, C. June Tazewell Hopedale 

[■ereton, Katherine Tazewell Pekin 

ssie, Lorna McLean Bloomington 

all, Florence Carmen Cook Oak Park 

n, Irene Lawrence Lawrenceville 

coe, Loretta Agnes Grundy Morris 

k, Florence May Kankakee Kankakee 

k, Helen Ruth Kankakee Kankakee 

erick, Catherine Grundy Morris 

ine, Mary Margarete Putnam Magnolia 

mm, Dollie M McLean Normal 

son, Cora M Piatt Lmtner 

ugher, Irma Vermilion Cheneyville 

n, Anna B Marshall Wenona 

n, Christina Marshall Wenona 

wn, Elsie Madison Alton 

n, Eula M Knox Altona 

n, Gladys Alma McLean Foosland 

n, Grace I Tazewell Morton 

wn, Hallie Peoria Peoria 

wn, Lettie Tazewell Morton 

rown, Mary Hamilton Christian Stonington 

rown, Maude Morgan Jacksonville 

rown, Nola Belle Macoupin Hettick 

rown, Pansy Jule Grundy Morris 

rubeck, Vida Lawrence Lawrenceville 



162 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Bruno, Cora G Champaign Tuscci 

Brusnigham, Elizabeth V Grundy Gardn' 

Bryan, Georgia Marion * Sale 

Buchanan, Ethel Tazewell Pek 

Buchanan, Florence Pike ' * ' Per 

Buck, Daisy Woodford .*. .*.'.'.' Eure 

Buck, Marguerite Madison Wood Riv' 

Buckingham, Minnie Macon Oakl 

Buokstegge, Marie Logan ".*.*.* * Linco 

Buerkett, Katie Louisa Menard Athe 

Bullard, Agnes May Macoupin Chesterfie 

Bullard, Pansy V Sangamon Lowd 

Bullard, Ruby S Sangamon Lowd 

Bullock, Agnes Irene Woodford ElPa 

Bulpitt, Blanches Sangamon Springfie 

Burdette, Dora Mae McLean Hold 

Burdette, Myrtle Idele (Ohio) V Sherwo( 

Burke, Lois W Douglas Tusco 

Burns, Nellie A Peoria . Peor 

Burns, Nettie C Bureau Princetc 

Burns, Ruth Ann Livingston Dwig 

Burr, Harriet Elon Kankakee Ess< 

Burr, Henrietta Kankakee Ess( 

Burt, Leatha Tazewell Armingtc 

Burtner, Nellie Ethel McLean Norm 

Bush, Ethalene Agnes McLean ' Danve 

Busick, Lor Raine McLean Heywor 

Buskirk, Ida Dayle Stark Toulc 

Butcher, Faye Macoupin Palmy 

Butcher, Verna Macoupin Palmyi 

Butler, Ethel L Macoupin Palmyi 

Butler, Vesta Macoupin Palmyj 

Button, Jessie Ford Paxtc ' 

Butzow, Ernestine Iroquois w'eliingtc 

Bybee, Marietta Bernice Pike Pleasant Hi 

Byrne, Mary C La Salle Sense 

Cam, Mrs. Lillie Macoupin Medoi 

Caldwell. Ruth M Iroquois Sheldc 

Calet Blanche R Christian Pan 

Calet Esther V Christian Par 

Calkin, Pearl Iroquois Crescent Gil 

Call, Nellie R Sangamon Curr£. 

Call, Roma Douglas Atwoc 

Callarman, Emma L Sangamon Rochestt 

Camp, Eleanor St. Clair SummerfieJ 

Campbell, Ada Sangamon Loan 

Campbell, Edna S Will Jolie 

Campbell, Esther Macon Decatu 

Campbell, Gladys M Henderson Biggsvill 

Campbell, Grace Virginia Livingston Fairbur 

Campbell, Mamie Olive Marshall Sparlan 

Campbell, Marguerite Menard Tallul 

Camper, Erbie Mae Iroquois Wellingto: 

Cannaday, Adele W Tazewell Pekii 

Cantrall, Ina Menard Athen 

Carberry, Helen Agnes Sangamon Springfielt 

Carberry, Margaret Mary Sangamon Springfiel( 

Carmichael, Edytha Piatt Milmin 

Carmody, Edith Greene Garrolltoi 

Carney, D. Esther Ford Sible: 

Carr, L. Clyde Cass ChandlervilL 

Carr, Lucille S LaSalle Ottawf 



ii 



Illinois State Normal University 163 

-.,_ NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

^Jfeigan, Nelle Woodford Panola 

"irrithers, Mrs. Florence Woodford Eureka 

irroll, Helen Catherine Pike Pittsfield 

irroll, Mary Peoria Princeville 

irter, Verna Irene Stark Toulon 

irver, Ruth Sangamon Springfield 

irveth, Lillie Piatt Gerro Gordo 

isey, Grace Baker Christian Pana 

ish, Elsie Myrtle Vermilion Hoopeston 

iswell, Maude Sangamon Lowder 

ithcart, Leta Peoria Elmwood 

ittell, Jessie Marion Salem 

lughey, Nellie Mae Livingston Chatsworth 

mghlan, Eleanor Ann St. Clair East St. Louis 

lamberlain. Lulu Mercer New Boston 

lamberlin, Edith Adams Beverly 

lamberlin, Gladys Montgomery Litchfield 

lambers, Jennie Edgar Metcalfe 

langnon, Bessie Kankakee St. Anne 

langnon, Dorothy Ella Kankakee St. Anne 

langnon, Edna Martha Kankakee St. Anne 

lapman, Bessie Scott Bluffs 

tiapman, Iva Champaign Longview 

lapman, Natalie Eleanor Greene Whitehall 

lard, Bessie Sangamon Rochester 

Carlton, Henrietta Tazewell Pekin 

leedle, Lillie Martha Woodford Metamora 

tienoweth, Bernice Ardell Brown Versailles 

leshire, Ruth Fredericka Christian Millersville 

lilberg, Irene Caroline Henry Ophiem 

lilds, Cora K St. Clair East St. Louis 

iristenson, E. Julia Putnam Putnam 

ark, Clare Knox Galesburg 

ark. Emma Myrtle Christian Assumption 

ark, Jessie Iroquois Gilman 

ark, Marie Livingston Ancona 

ark, Mary Piatt Mansfield 

ark, Myrtle Ogle Polo 

arke, Helen W Sangamon Springfield 

ary, Delcie M Menard Petersburg 

QdiTj, Marcella Woodford El Paso 

elland, Frances H Grundy South Wilmington 

ement, Mary Pauline Christian Pana 

endenen, Muriel Alice McLean Normal 

endenen, Ruth Georgia McLean Normal 

lifford, Josephine Champaign Penfield 

ine, Helen E McLean Leroy 

ine, Jessie M DeWitt Clinton 

inton, N. Irene Cass Beardstown 

oke, Beulah Kankakee Kankakee 

)ady, Nellie Agnes Christian Pawnee 

3alson, Annie C Madison Alhambra 

3ay, Lillie Elizabeth Piatt Monticello 

Dddington, Helen McLean Normal 

)dy, Sayde E Livingston Dwight 

)dy, Viola Livingston Dwight 

Dffman, Mary Stella Marshall Lacon 

)foid, Florence La Salle Tonica 

)gdal, Elsie Tazewell Hopedale 

)gdal, Viola LaSalle LaSalle 

)law, Myrtle Maree Logan Atlanta 

Dlbert, Vera Shelby Moweaqua 



164 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY P08T0FFIS 

Cblburn, Marjorie Sangamon Loam 

Colburn, Nina Sangamon Loam 

Colby, Geneva Cresep St. Clair East St. Loui 

Cole, Fay Macon Macoi 

Cole, Una Knox Williamsfiel( 

Collett, Vera Moultrie Lovingtoi 

Collet, Vivian L Moultrie Lovingtoi 

Collins, Bertha Adams Quinc^ 

Collins, Eloise Gibson Macon Decatu' 

Collins, Ethel Champaign Champaigi 

Collins, Mae McLean Saybrool 

Collins, V. Geneva Pike New Cantoi 

Colyer, Ruth Elizabeth Piatt Hammonc 

Condit, Lois A Champaign Dewe: 

Conklin, Grayce Mason Kilbourn 

Conley, Rose Ella Grundy Morri 

Connaghan, Mary S (Wyoming) Rivertoi 

Connor, Elizabeth G Macon Nianti( 

Conover, Hilda Gertrude Peoria Monici 

Cook. Clara M Iroquois Onarg; 

Cook, Kathleen Vermilion Vermilion Grov( 

Coon, Bede Champaign Urbam 

Coonrod, Helen Christian Taylorvillt 

Cooper Elsie Ethel McLean Norma 

Cooper, Esther Vermilion Danvillf 

Cooper, Flossie Fae Macon Decatui 

Cooper, Laura Longstreet Macon Maroi 

Copeland, Josephine A Warren Monmoutl 

Corbitt, Jeannette F McLean Gridlei 

Corder, Florence Victoria Lake Zion Citj 

Corkhill, Myrtle Emma Livingston Fairburj 

Corneille, Sadie Rhea Wabel . . .Bureau Princetoi 

Cornelius, Madeline Tazewell Armingtoi 

Corney, Fannie Evelyn Peoria Peorii 

Corrigan, Nellie Elizabeth Sangamon New Berlii 

Costly, Fern De Witt Weldoi 

Coultas, Lulu M Morgan MurrayvilU 

Courtney, Frances La Salle Streatoi 

Courtney, Mary Theresa Kankakee Kankake» 

Cousins, Agnes E Madison Upper Altoi 

Cousins, Ida J Madison Upper Altoi 

Cowan, Eva S McLean Norma 

Cowan, Grace Helen McLean Norms^ 

Cowie, Marion Macoupin Gillespi. 

Cox, Marie Bond Mulberry Grovt 

Cox, Martha Bond Mulberry Grov^ 

Cox, Thelma Randolph Baldwii 

Craig, Margie Elizabeth Mercer Seatoi 

Crawford, Christiana Fayette Patoki 

Crawford, Clementine Champaign Tolom 

Crawford, Hassie Franklin Bentoi 

Craycroft, Jessie May Macon Dalton Cit) 

Creath, Anna Gertrude St. Clair East St. Louis 

Creel, Edith Mae Macon Decatui 

Cressey, Bertha Elizabeth Sangamon Springfielc 

Crichfield, Rena M Livingston Fairburj 

Crichton, Margaret E McLean Towandf 

Crihfield, Helen Tazewell Miniei 

Crompton, Mabelle Rock Island Rock Islam 

Cropper, Lula M (Florida) Tallahassee 

Cross, Madeline Shirley Greene Carrollto? 

Crow, Mildred Greene Carrolltor 



,,, I NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

r Uer Pearl Moultrie Bethany 

• ^ &p11 ' Fern Morgan Waverly 

^M to Lucy .:::;:: St. Clalr Lebanon 

^"' sius, Edna Mae McLean Lexington 

„ , nke Grace Stephenson Dakota 

lamsfii pj, E Edna Livingston Flanagan 

'''"^^^^ Iningham, Gecile Fern Morgan Murray ville 

??i Iningham, Luella Peoria Pnnceville 

r^" ningham Margaret Loretta . . .Will Joliet 

^^^^. ningham, M. Mary Will Joliet 

ampai jiev Nelle McLean Bloommgton 

^aybro ipv Fern G Whiteside Prophetstown 

^CmI liiing, Maud R Will. Wilmington 

'^"15 lick Nora Peoria Edwards 

;> ter,' Luella Marie McLean ^rS\^^^ 

'Iboi' kendall, Addie I Cumberland J°^®^9 

•^«ney, Juanita A McLean Normal 



Illinois State Normal University 



165 



Riverl |ey 'Kate Champaign Champaign 

^'iiii ley Nettie T Champaign Champaign 

■ ^ imann, Hilda DuPage Bensenville 

Odh! i^rmple, Dora Belle Edgar Chrisman 

JiGf3 f Rose Marshall Toluca 

^'rl)2 iel, Mary Christine McLean Normal 

lyloni 'iel Nora Ann Madison Upper Alton 

■> iner, Leota Fulton Astoria 

^m mstatter, Helen St. Clair New Athens 

I^«cal ,ber Rose Putnam Putnam 

• Jla! tidson, Genevieve A Woodford ,?.^^S^^ 

'«! tidson, Golda Madison Worden 

■ Grift tidson, L. Edith Tazewell Armington 

IioiiC tidson, Nora E Woodford S^^®H^ 

Fair!)! :ies, Margaret Ellen Menard Tallula 

''mi is, Alfa Macon Decatur 

mi lis, Dana Bond Mulberry Grove 



Shelby Moweaqua 

Woodford ElPaso 

Champaign St. Joseph 

McLean Bloommgton 

Vermilion Potomac 

Woodford Minonk 

Macoupin Hettick 

Pulaski Olmsted 

Morgan Jacksonville 

Piatt Cerro Gordo 

Lake Zion City 

Pike Pittsfield 

Livingston Odell 

McLean Holder 

, Macon Niantic 

, Sangamon Pawnee 

, Iroquois Wellington 

, Pike Pearl 

, Brown Versailles 

, McLean Normal 

, Carroll Mt. Carroll 

.Vermilion Rossville 

. McLean Normal 

.Ford Gilman 

. Iroquois La Hogue 

. Bureau Tiskilwa 

D Lief, Gertrude St. Clair O'Fallon 

D tier, Margaret W St. Clair O'Fallon 



h -is, Eula A. 
w Ber ;is, Frances 

Well -is, Grace Ethel 

rayri ,'is, Rebecca E 

M ds, Ruth Ellen 

vaokil dson, Lela Belle 

)er.\l /son, Edna Abigail .. 
}erAl 7son, Emma 

Non i^son, Norma Wood . . 

Noi^kins, Laura Eugenia 

n, Alice B 

TyMn, Ella Rose 

ryCi fenbaugh, Pearl 

BaldBaney, Catherine E — 
ney, Jeanie 

M iLay, Mrs. Elizabeth , 

W Ij Hazel Rachel 

dson, Trula Arlene . 
Itonl mis, Elsie ■ 



nis, Maude Susan 
ismore, Bonnie . . 
ler, Julia Alice . . 
veese, Edith M. . . 

rcouff, Bessie 

rcouff, Ella 

on, Abbie 



166 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFPIg 

Divilbiss, Edith DeWitt Farmer Cj 

Dobson, Lulu Piatt Cerro Gor 

Dodson, Christine McLean Bloomingt' 

Doe, Goldie Margaret McLean Norn 

Doering, Doris E Peoria Peoi 

Doherty, Edna Marguerite (North Dakota) Fairmou 

Dole, Mary Izetta Kankakee Mante 

Doner, Alice A Moultrie Betha 

Donmoyer, Ruby Clay Flc 

Donovan, Florence I Iroquois Clift 

Donovan, Gertrude H Will Jol 

Donovan, Grace M Will Jol 

Donovan, Margaret Christian Assumpti 

Doody, Alice Woodford ElPa 

Doran, Ruth Piatt Hammo 

Dornburg, Elsie A Kankakee Reddi 

Dorr, Grace Madison Word 

Dowd, Gladys Iroquois Watse 

Dowd, Margaret Tazewell Delav 

Downey, Anna V Iroquois Hoopest 

Downs, Bernice J Champaign Mahorr 

Dreyer, Hulda K Mason Man; 

DriscoU, Marie Bureau Tiskih 

Driscoll, Nelle Bureau Tiskib 

Drum, Julia Marie Macoupin Palmy 

Dubson, Gladys Matilda Piatt Montiee 

Duff, Julia Edith McLean Norir 

Dulaney, Noma Hamilton Dahlgr 

Dumais, Dora Kankakee St. An 

Dunbar, Cora Ann McLean Norir 

Duncan, Hallie Jane Macoupin Bright 

Dunkman, Elsie Champaign St. Jose; 

Dunn, Edyth Effingham Dieteri 

Dunn, Sara Mary St. Clair Maris 

Dunne, Nellie Grace Moultrie Sulliv: 

Durdel, Minnie Mason Man! 

Durflinger, Blanche Macon Nian*. 

Durham, Carrie A Washington Ashl' 

Durham, Eunice L Marshall Toln 

Durham, Margaret B Bureau Wain 

Durkee, Mildred N Whiteside Fulli 

Durst, Ruby Franklin West FrankfC 

Duvall, Anne Elizabeth Macon Argei? 

Dwyer, Katherine Mason Kilbpur 

Dyer, Elsie E Greene Hillvi« 

Dyke, Helen C Bureau Prinoefc 

Eales, Nell Schuyler Rushvil 

Easterbrook, E. Pearl McLean Bloomingt« 

Eaton, Mellie I Lawrence Summ 

Eaton, Tressie B Lawrence Sumn 

Ebert, Laura May Ford Robei 

Edds, Vera Oriene McLean Norm 

Eddy, Vera Isyl Bureau LaMoil 

Edgerton, L. Eveline Lake Zion Ci 

Edwards, C. Emma St. Clair East St. LoU 

Edwards, Lena Lawrence Bridgepo 

Edwards, Mrs. Minnie Alice .... Montgomery Donnellst 

Edwards, Ora Gladys Madison Tr< 

Eggenberger, Bertha Livingston Od( 

Eggenberger, Christina Livingston Ode 

Egley, Ruth Iroquois Milfo] 

Ehnen, Esther E Livingston Saunan 



^Z Illinois State Normal University 167 

^SlDFn I' ^ NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

^•^^f nthaller, Kathryn Marshall Toluca 

f"^o(i is, Gladys Hallett Menard Athens 

loomij er, Opal Vermilion Danville 

■ '^'8 pedge, Ruth Macon Niantic 

•;■ h k Frances Rose Marshall Sparland 

% mberger, Myra P McLean Normal 

• h jott, Ethel June Vermilion Fairmount 

• M ott, Fae A Adams Payson 

"•• 1 iott, Lura Muriel Vermilion Fairmount 

•■ CI [ott, Nellie Mildred Stark Toulon 

• .. I I, Hazel Livingston Dwight 

"•• I lerick, Lucille Lawrence Sumner 

^sij ierson, Anna McLean Bloomington 

•• ierson, Edith Ann Christian Stonington 

Htia lert, Josie Fayette Vandalia 

. U isry, DoUie Macoupin Bunker Hill 

•• Wj Imert, Agnes Marie Iroquois Donovan 

• Wai imert, Margaret G Iroquois Donovan 

. Df! jmons. Winifred Hancock Hamilton 

Hoofs lemon, Maud Sangamon Chatham 

U ifle, Rose McLean Normal 

.. I flish, Elizabeth McLean Normal 

Tisi lis, Minnie Montgomery Pawnee 

Tl'1 iminger, Mrs. Lucille Adam.s Coatsburg 

. U [rekin, Gladys St. Clair Caseyville 

Monti irikin, Virginia Isabella Morgan Murrayville 

.. \ iitein, Rebecca Bertha Livingston Dwight 

. M ist, Elsie Grundy Braceville 

. SI Dkson, Minnie C Bureau Ohio 

., k if, Marie Claudina Ford Gibson City 

Brii |ep, Lola B Peoria Peoria 

iUi hison, Hattie Mae Cass Virginia 

DiPli ms, Bernice Piatt Mansfield 

,. J[! itt, Estella (Arkansas) Waldron 

^ itt, Hassie Clarkson (Arkansas) Waldron 

[y, E. Elizabeth Woodford Benson 

E 3ll, Estella Pope Golconda 

iey, Marguerite Kankakee Bradley 

mv, Mina S Tazewell Pekin 

. wBrbairn, Alice B Will Joliet 

rchild, Alice Elda Tazewell Pekm 

FrasMrlie, Jennie M Henry Cambridge 

etti, Jennie E Grundy Carbon Hill 

ingham, Millie A McLean Towanda 

son, Carrie Christian Assumption 

PrWr, Nina Marie Henry Kewanee 

rell, Clara M Adams Fowler 

ht, Anna Marshall Varna 

guson, Estella McLean Normal 

iter, Bridia Livingston Graymont 

enschuh, Gretchen Grace . . . Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Iden, Helena Cass Chandlerville 

Iden, Nellie Cass Chandlerville 

7nT»«ilds, Marguerite Elizabeth . . . Vermilion Hoopeston 

, iiMenscher, Mrs. Amy B Ford Gibson City 

Mm^> Flora ^>t. Clair O'Fallon 

" "nigan, Helen Ford Gibson City 

th, Evelyn Macoupin Gillespie 

th, Gladys Tazewell Green Valley 

F her, Lucile Piatt Hammond 

Fi^gerald. Marie Madison Alton 

F z Henry, Grace Ford Gibson City 



168 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



I 



NAME COUNTY POSTOPPI 

Fitzpatrick, Mable McLean Col! 

Flager, Lillie E Tazewell Dela- 

Fleming, Elsie Kankakee Hersc 

Flor, Nellie Lee Logan Line 

Flora, Ruth M Ford Pax 

Flynn, Josie Livingston Cull 

Fogle, Violet Valora LaSalle Grand Ri 

Foltz, Marie Macon Deca 

Foote, Idah Frances Pike Pittsfl 

Foran, Katherine Putnam Granv 

Forbes, Hazel Floryne Tazewell Arming 

Force, Julia Mason Said 

Foreman, Blye Eleanor Pike Pe 

Foreman, Margaret Greene Roodho 

Fortune, Alice M St. Clair Caseyv 

Foskule, Grace Bertha McLean Blooming 

Foskule, Lena McLean Blooming 

Fosseen, Elizabeth M Livingston Ponl 

Foster, Edna M Peoria Elmw^ 

Foster, Nannie L Warren Monmo 

Fraker, Helen Josephine Shelby Shelbyv 

Francis, Ada Mae Iroquois Iroqi 

Franklin, Cora Ellis Vermilion Ran 

Franzi, Alice Madison Collinsv 

Eraser, Agnes Henry Kewa 

Eraser, Beatrice Kankakee Bourbonr 

Freed, Alma McLean Grid 

Freehill, Clare Livingston Strsj 

Freehill, Veronica Livingston Stra 

Freeman, Clarissa Rock Island Rock Isli 

Freeman, Ruth Saline Harrisb f 

Freitag, Jessie Elizabeth Tazewell Mii f 

French, Ada Evadne McLean Le " 

French, Lela C Marion Sandr 

Friess, Mildred M Peoria Glasf 

Frisbee, Esther McLean Blooming 

Fry, Ruth Pike Rocki: 

Frye, Alma Livingston Fairb \ 

Frye, Leona Mae Woodford Se ^ 

Frye, Marguerite Livingston Fairb 

Fuchs, Lily St. Clair OTa 

Fulton, Gertrude Livingston Cul 

Funcke, Ida St. Clair Belle^ 

Funk, Irene Pearl McLean Nor 

Funk, Lela McLean Nor; 

Furness, Mabel Mary Coles Sulli 

Gabriel, Sarah Lucille Macon Blue Moid 

Gaddis, Ethel Pearl Woodford Carl k 

Gaddis, Hazel McLean Carl 

Gaeschel, Anna St. Clair Casej^ 

Galbraith, Helen Kankakee Brae 

Gallagher, Mae LaSalle Sen 

Gallagher, Marguerite J Iroquois Ashk 

Gallagher, Mary E Iroquois Ashk 

Gallagher, Nellie M Logan New Holl; 

Gannon, Isabel Ford Gib 

Gannon, Ruth Eleanor Marshall Tol 

Gantz, Mrs. Ettie McLean Blooming 

Garber, Freeda Ford Gib 

Gardner, Roberta Marshall Rutl 

Garrett, Lolah Marie Sangamon River 

Gasaway, Alice E McLean Non-. 






.1 

Pi« 
• Gra 

: 

Roil 

'lOOlDi 



If 

Illinois State Normal University 169 

NAME * COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

^swjBcho, Hazel E Madison S^^J^^^ 

I cho Lottie I Madison ^''^^^ 

■ssensmith, Blanche Livingston Odell 

St, Hattie Marie Will Peptone 

fVhell Ada LaSalle Ottawa 

tes AnnaE. :: Will , ^l^^f^f^ 

tes, Laurina Iroquois Watseka 

thman, Lizzie Mae McLean Arrowsmith 

bauer, Alma A Madison v:/ * ' * • ^^^^ 

e. Gladys Lorraine McLean Bloommgton 

hm, Gleo Maude Macon Macon 

igef, Celia McLean Towanda 

ilert, Anna Tazewell Pekm 

nseal, Maurine Tazewell Mackinaw 

nt, Alice Edith Macoupin Brighton 

orge, Mildred Mary Morgan Jacksonville 

rber, Minnie D Iroquois Gissna Park 

rling Lena McLean Bloommgton 

rth Ella Marshall Toluca 

liglieri, Frances Marshall Toluca 

beaut, Mae McLean Bloomington 

bier, M. Lena Greene White Hall 

, blin, Mary Lee Harmon 

• I; bson, Catherine Clay Louisville 

!^ bson, Sybley Grundy Gardner 

feseke, Frieda Clinton Trenton 

Iffin, Ona Macon Argenta 

'mik ibert, Florence Olive Montgomery Raymond 

Ibert, Grace Virginia St. Clair Belleville 

Idersleeve, Gladys Rowena . . . McLean Hudson 

les, Annie Lou Tazewell Deer Greek 

lies, Ruth Arline Livingston Dwight 

Siff' llespie, Anne W Rock Island Rock Island 

1 lliland, Elfleda Holmes McLean Normal 

ingerich, Elizabeth E Iroquois Loda 

nther, Minnie C Tazewell Pekm 

isinger, Rose Macon Argenta 

ilooi Yins, Alpha M McLean Heyworth 

asgow, Edna Belle Peoria Hanna City 

asgow, Elsie Grundy Braceville 

over, Elva Elizabeth St. Clair Belleville 

ad, Elinor Macoupin Carlinville 

dbey, Grace Geraldine Menard Greenview 

)dfrey, Elizabeth Peoria Peoria 

Bei ^df rey, Grace Adams Quincy 

. X )etz, Clara Barbara Lawrence Lawrenceville 

... ^ ^ff, Bertha Montgomery Litchfield 

Dley, Anna W ^ Livingston Emington 

•)och, Mary Esther St. Clair Belleville 

)odheart, Mrs. Stella JosephineMcLean Normal 

)odknecht, Esther H Kankakee Kankakee 

Cas bodpaster, Pearl Evelyn Logan Mt. Pulaski 

ordinier, Irina Kankakee Momence 

brman, Ethel Bureau Buda 

3ttschalk, Louise McLean Bloomington 

Duld, Catherine R McLean Bloomington 

Duld, Mrs. Jessie Macon Argenta 

Duld, Mary Cecelia McLean Bloomington 

3uld, Mildred Clay Flora 

ooriBran, Amelia E Henry Cambridge 

pant, Hilda M Peoria Brimfield 

pau, Lena Pauline Christian Assumption 

raves. Flora Lee Carroll Savanna 

raves, Lois Amy Stark Duncan 



,J 



)liie 



( 



170 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 'P 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFPlI 

Graves, Stella I Stark Duni 

Gray, Ada Rebecca Piatt .... Dp! 

Gray, Erie Grace Piat^. '.'/.','.'.'.' De 

^ray, Gladys Henderson Gladst 

Gray, xMabel Ellen Peoria Prinppv 

Gray, Mabel I Pike ....;... W ;'* ' PUtsf 

Gray, Mary Iroquois ".' Ashk 

Gray, Oral Mildred Livingston Pom 

Gray Riebe Irene Livingston '. Ponj 

Greeder, Ruth E. . Livingston Chatswo 

Gree y, Jessie Loretta Kankakee Kanka 

Greely, Mayme A Kankakee Kanka 

Green, Frances McLean Nori 

Green, Jane . . McLean Nori 

Green, Margaret E Sbott .... Nar 

Green, Marie Mitchell McLean *.'.*. Norn 

Green, Mary McLean '. *. * Blioming 

Green, Nelle B McLean Norr 

Greenawalt, Margaret Kankakee .' KankaJM 

Greene, Marie Ida Peoria Princevl 

Greensbury, Iva Pulaski ! ! 'Grand GhS 

Greensbury, Olive Pulaski Grand Chi 

Grethe, Jannetta W. Englena . . . Piatt Delft 

Griffith, Cleqra Montgomery '..•.*.:; Sorei 

Grigsby, Sadie Ann Marion CentraS 

Grimm, Helen M Marshall WencJ 

Griscel, Ruth Geneva Hancock " Warsi 

Groth, Sophia Sylvia Woodford .'.*** ElpJ 

Grubb, Blanche Violet Montgomery *. 'Barni 

Grubbs, Mary Ellen Henry Kewa 5 

Grubel, Mabel J Iroquois [. .' . Sheldi 

Guest, Inez . . . . Kankakee ReddS 

Guilmger, Lillian Althea Warren MonmoiS 

g^^^' Elva St. Clair i.!. BeTeviS 

Haag, Delia Livingston Cull(2 

Hackman, Elizabeth M Morgan Jacksonvi« 

Hagan, Eva Leona .Henry Kewar J 

Hageboeck, Leona Graf Bureau Tiskil'3 

Hagens, Mary C Ford " ' Paxt? 

Haggard, Ola Maria Woodford .'. .'.'.* '.'. ' Pan(t< 

Hagi, Helen Elizabeth LaSalle .* .* * Ranscif 

Hahn, Christine Livingston Dwip,/ 

Haig, Emily St. Clair Caseyvi-' 

Haig, Pauline St. Clair Caseyvi 

Haldorson, Mabel Grundy Coal C: 

Halkyard, Jennie Will . . joi^ 

Halkyard, Marguerite Will . . . .'. jnlj 

Hall, Eva E Piatt '. .V.V.'.V.V Ahvo 

g^ ' Jessie Will Joli 

Hal , Letha Piatt Atwo> 

Ha , Muriel Alice McLean Norm 

Hall, Nelle Will Joli 

Hall, Pauline Myrtle Pike Pea 

Haljidan, Mary Hazel McLean .*...*.*.'." Bellflow 

Ha ing, Florence Iroquois Thawvil 

Hallsted, Mary Florence Mercer Keithsbu" 

Haltschlag, Theresa Adams Ouim 

Ham^ilton, Lmna Hamilton Broughtc 

Hamman, Bertha Orra Piatt Bemei 

Hampton, Frances Willard Sangamon Mechanicsbui 

Hampton, Ruth Anna Sangam.on Mechanicsbui 



Illinois State Normal University 171 

muM' NAME COUNTY POSTOPFIS 

n, criPP Hazpl Livingston Campus 

■ \ S mil . : Clark* Martinsville 

" Zink Fern Tazewell Minier 

J £n ?v Mav Marshall Lacon 

fl KiZ' Keel a Vermilion Hoopeston 

pS SnSum Lucile . ! Marshall Wenona 

»n?oif 'Erma McLean Bloomington 

¥ l^lnn mu . McLean Bloomington 

^^•B^iod-Aiu^e Macou^n VWen 

"t '^Ir owe ''l.Tuke ! ! ! i ! i i ! ! ! i i : McLean " i i i : i : i i ! i ' Bloomington 

? Sr- £a =^"^ : : : :So^n •::::::::;:• co&"l^^ 

'!; fr : hS d.- :::::::::::.•• cook ... ^eirose park 

hi [arrison Lucile Janet Mmnesota) Aitkin 

S frrX Ada Florence Lawrence LawrenceviUe 

S art, Adah Hope Knox R^t nnf 

■a Jart, Eunice Esther Knox DeLong 

t & Sa^ :::::::::::::: :»eside- •.•.-.•.•.•.•.•.•. .^h « 

W Catcher Bessie Sangamon Loami 

I brt^ai^ ::::::::::::::::w"o'?d^^d\\\\\\\\\\- mXu'r'^ 

■ ' Kwk Sadfe Woodford Washburn 

■Z Pi, f^ ■■■■■■ g>i-p^*^" ■:::::::::rr^l^ 

"i '^a7PTivaepr Edna Bureau Walnut 

t iK M 'Cecifil : : : christian ^c'oSville 

m aedden, Barbara ^.^,^P°^ Atwood 

' aeerdt, Elsa Martha F^^/^; f P^ii^ton 

Hefner, Kathryn ^SH^"" Hir/JmaS 

Heidrick, Fern Edgar rhr .man 

Heidrick Lelia Edgar NnS 

^S Hein, Mrs. Elizabeth M McLean Normal 

''• Heinrich, Gertrude L Peoria RinnmSn 

Henderson, Mary Grace McLean Bloomington 

Hennessy, Lillian M. //.::'.'.'.'.' WmT: .::::. .Jpliet 



( 

Case: 

Coal 

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.J 



m 



mi 



menuersuii, maiy \Mayj^ -— — T miicjvillp 

Hendy, Myrtle Aurelia ^}^l ' ' ari^^-^P Citv 

Hennelly. Loretta ^??/'°'' Joliet 

Hennessy, Lillian M Will Joiiet 

Henrikson, Anna Marie Menard Athens 

, Henry, Jeannette H Ford kankqkpp 

•1 iHenry Marian Frances Kankakee R^vmni^d 

Herman, Hulda Adelle Montgomery Po^moSd 

\ iHerman Marguerite Cecelia .... Montgomery ^^rJ^mal 

■ jHerriott, Hazel May McLean rAldPn Fa^fe 

•■:*Herter, Cora Sarah f.^^^^T..; R fd^ef a? m 

Hester Harriet Beryl Vermilion Ridg^larm 



T^! Heyer ' Ava ... *. '. '• '• '• '• *• '• '• : Champaign Fisher 

^*t Sa'rd^Eva'c. :::: Mason ^^^entoS 

• *? Hirkman Acnes Franklm ,t i - 

3^:1 Hick^ Giadll'^M. ::::.: Montgomery ^V^o't^Trst 

Hicks Mary Elizabeth Henderson ^^^^'^Irnrris 

Higgins, Myrtle Grundy Morns 



172 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY P0ST0FPI8 

Hill, Josephine Irene Tazewell PnV 

Hill, Lottie F Hancock .*.' *Hamilt. 

Hi , Opal Ruth Champaign ..... ..... . Ogd 

Hillier, Marguerite Sangamon Sprinfffip 

Hilhg, Ernestine M Cass Virgin 

Hillrichs, Irma Logan ' Atlan 

Hilton, Minnie Randolph .'.'.'*.' * .* * Chest 

Hilty, Katharina Barbara Livingston Saunem 

Hinderliter, Annabel Fulton Ciil 

Hindle, Margaret Ellen Will .'.*.*'.* Joij 

Hines, Margaret Peoria Peer 

Hinshaw, Sylvia Saline ' Harrisbui 

Hirschi, Amelia (Missouri) St. Lou 

Kitchens, Hattie M Iroquois Del R( 

Hite, Lucretia Ruffner St. Clair East'st Lou 

Hitt, Mary W .McLean Bloomingtc 

HoDson, Belle Iroquois - Cliftc 

Hobson, Carolyn Louise Iroquois Cliftc 

Hockenbury, Mamie E Woodford * Metamoi 

Hodges, Goldia G Vermilion Ridgefan 

Hodges, Luna Lucile Clay Floi 

Hodsdon, F. Louise Whiteside '. *. * Lyndo 

Hofmann, Hattie Tazewell Mackina' 

Hogan, Effie Christian Pan 

Hogan, Gertrude Christian Pan 

Hoge, Marie LaSalle Wenon 

gogje, Lena M Iroquois Sheldo 

Ho den, Cecelia Perry Tamaro 

Holden, Louise Tazewell Peki 

Holdinghaus, Ethel Madison Granite Cit 

Holland, Gertrude Logan Lincol 

Holland, Hazel E Logan ./.....'. Lincol 

HoUenback, Blanche Cook Chicag 

Hollenback, Letah Cook Chicag 

Holley, Aurelia Knox Oneid 

Holley, Esther M McLean Norma 

Holliday, Anna May LaSalle Streato 

Holliday, Camilla Sangamon Divernoi 

Hollister, Grace Aldora Iroquois Led 

Holman, Eunice Randolph .* .* 'cheste" 

Holmes, Evelyn B Kankakee Momenc 

Holmes, F. Gertrude Kankakee Momenc* 

Holmgren, Esther Henry Kewane. 

Holton, Edith Mai Marshall Wenom 

Holyer, Myrtle DeWitt Weldor 

Holz, Elsie T. J Marshall Tolucs 

Hood, Feme Florence Champaign Mahomel 

Hood, Nelle Beatrice Champaign Mahomel 

Hoover, Effie H Warren Berwick 

Hopewell, Helen Gertrude Mason San Jose 

Hopkins, Ada G Macon Decatur 

Hopkins, Mabel Bureau Tampico 

Hoppe, Carrie Madison Alton 

Horan, May Kankakee Chebanse 

Horney, Burma McLean Normal 

Morton, Lucile D Pike Rock Port 

Houchen, Bonnie G Shelby Cowden 

Houck, Helen Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Houseweart, Minnie Mabel Pike Kinderhook 

Houston, Beth McLean Leroy 

Howard, Beulah Adams Payson 

Howard, Cora Will Braidwood 



I 






Illinois State Normal University 173 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFPIS 

Howard, Florence Harriett Adams g- J^^^^^ 

Howard, ^ladys Grundy *. Coal City 

Howard Pear Estella ^runay Bloomington 

Howe, Charlotte Ford Sibley 

Hrdhcka Emily Franklin Elkville 

g^^^^' Ni?f7 Pearl *. *• : FraSklS . ! . ! Elkville 

Hubbs, Nella Pearl ^ Joliet 

Hudak, Julia V W iamsoA' Herrin 

Hudgens Lena LivSon Forrest 

Hueni, Bertha T v niston Forrest 

Hueni, Mane Cook ^ .'.*.'.'. . Chicago 

Huettmann, Edna McLeaA' Normal 

Huffmgton, Fern McLeIn " " Normal 

Huffington, ,Ruth froauo^s " Milford 

Hufford, Lois Irene mS ** Macon 

Hughes, Betty Holliday Mo?gan* '"::... Jacksonville 

Hughes, Ella Pearl Woodford " Minonk 

Hughes, Florence Kankakee St. Anne 

Hughes, Rosalind E Sangamon * *.' ....... . Divernon 

Hulett, Helen Adlmf Fowler 

Hulse, Dora. Maude Crawford'.*.'.* Robinson 

Hummel, Lois E. DeW tt DeWitt 

Hunt, Julia Gertrude Fulton Ipava 

Hunt, Mary Kathryn :^^iton pP^^.^ 

Hurd, Martha G?undv *"*;:.*: Morris 

Hurrie, Anna T SangamoA* '. Illiopolis 

Hurt, Ruth L Morgan ....... . . Jacksonville 

Huss, Olive G. McLean Cropsey 

Huston, Aletha D. . , McLean • • • Carrollton 

Hutchens, Alice Lucille Grundv ' * * * Morris 

Hutchings, Mae VprmilioA* * * *. Hoopeston 

Hutchison, Jess.ie Marie McLean " . . . . Normal 

Huxtable. Mamie Gertrude chamnaign' * Rantoul 

Hyde, Marion A ChaSmlS ' Gifford 

Hylbert, Annie Laurie RanSSoh ' . • . Sparta 

Hyndman, Eva sfar^ ^ "••.... Wyoming 

Imes, Hazel Faye ^^^^,^ _ Gibson City 

Inman, Leona ^'^ '.'.*/.... Williamsfield 

Ireland, Leatha F. Tazeweh" Delavan 

Ireland, Mellie Blanche mS • ' ^^^^^^ 

Irwin, Ima TazpwelV " Armington 

Israel, Irene McLean *.*.** Bloomington 

Jabin, Bertha L . , T aSalle Rutland 

Jackson, Leila Elvma Ta/ewell Pekin 

Jacobs, Agnes McLean ".'.'.'.'.... Bloomington 

Jacobs, Emma E T f vinlston Odell 

Jacobson, Clara Mor?ln *. '. '. . • • Murray viUe 

James, Bessie B Woodford Eureka 

James, Florence Tazewell .'.... • P^kin 

Janssen, Ulricka Madiron Troy 

Jarvis, Henrietta Norma S,tt . . Manchester 

Jasper, Zora Lee Mor-an ' *.*.*.*.'.*.*.'.'. . Murrayville 

Jennings, Grace E Marshall ^arna 

Jesse, Emma Marsha *" "Varna 

Jesse, Flora rhamDaign* ' * * *. Urbana 

Jester, Fannie Sr .'.'.*. Newton 

Johnson, Mrs. Allie H Kankakee' Buckingham 

Johnson, Arlie ^nrd Melvin 

Johnson, Emma MpT Pan .' Normal 

Johnson, Esther Louise MpT pan Normal 

Johnson, Florence E McLeaS * ' * * ' *• *. *• '• • Bloomington 

Johnson, Florence K iMci^ean 









^'^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study V? 

/^^^, COUNTY P0ST0FFI8 

Johnson, Jennie June McLean Ellsworth 

Johnson, Marian March McLean nSi 

Johnson, Mrytle K Will i>ormal 

Johnson, Pearl Inez Ford d^k ?'' 

Johnson, Pearl Nettie St Clair ¥^Vi '^,t^ 

Johnson, Rovilla Caroline ! ChampSgn •;;;;;. ^^'^ ^^ Sidney 

Johnson, Sara Fay Fulton . Farmiiston 

Johnston, Aenid McLean -' armington 



0= Gladys bv ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! -.Te^^^ion ::::;::: .^'"^^l^^l"! 

Johnston, Mae McLean 

Jones, Bernadine Logan 

Jones, Fern Woodford 

Jones, Florence Louise Will 

Jones, Frances Amy McLean*.*. 

Jones, Hattie Merle LaSalle . 

Jones, Helen R Menard 

Jones, Irma Woodford" Minonk 



Jones, Bernadine Logan Hudson 

Jones, Fern Woodf 

Jones, Florence Louise Will 

Jones, Frances Amy McLean 

Jones, Hattie Merle LaSalle Streator 



Jones, Fern .. Woodford ... M^^onk 

Jones, Florence Louise Will Wilminfff on 

Jones, Frances Amy McLean XrmS 



Jones, Lucile ... Cumberland Toledo 

Jones, Mabel E izabeth McLean Normal 

i'^'l' .1^£ E'^^'/. ^^?m^ '. .'.••.'.'. Virden 



Jones, Mary Lucmda Christian Edinbu?e 

Jones, Mary Mabel Mason Mason Citf 

Jones, Viola Madison Yen cp 

Jud^Ffh^ef F ?r'^¥^,?^ '.'."•Reddck 

iudt Mav r Marshall Wenona 

Judge, May C. Livingston Dwiffhf 

Judy, Stella Mabel Lawrence Sumler 

Julien, E. Maude Iroauois SuJI^^^ 

Junk, Marie Clayton /VcLiln .::::::'.::" " NorS 

Kamm, Leonie Madison V HighS 

Kammermann, Hermma Livingston Forrpsf 

Kane, Mary Cecelia Sangamon * Springfield 

Kasten, Emma Margaret Macoupin GarnnvillP 

Kayse, Maymie DeWitt " Clinton 

Kearns, Margaret L. Champaign .* ! .* . "^ philo 

Kearns, Nellie Gertrude Champaign Urbana 

Kp 1 wfii T M^'^^^'' Centralia 

p er^^a^: .::;:;::;::::::: ^^h •.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.• ^-^^ 
pp: Si^^!^^^. :::::: : :S^^^l .; v.v • • BiocJs^i 

Ke ey. Lola Viola Ford V. '. pS 

Ke ley, Lydia Esther LaSalle ' * ' ' ot^wa 

Kelhger, Zeta Eloise Christian p™ 

Ke y, Jessie M Logan W AtlarSa 

Ke ly, Katherine Frances Vermilion *. * " * Danville 

Ke ly, Lillian Marshall ! ToTuca 

Ke ly, Mae . . Marshall . ' To uca 

Ke ly, Margaret Marshall To uca 

Kelly, Marie Will ... fniipf 

Kelly, Mary ....Mason.;:::::;::;;: Man to 

Ke y, Mary Elizabeth Livingston ! ! Fairbury 

Keltz, Margaret Cecelia Brown Rinlev 

Kemp, Anna McLean '/." 'Normal 

Kemp, Helen M LaSalle WenSia 



Illinois State Normal University 175 

NAMB COUNTY POSTOPPIS 

tendall, Velda Cass -^ • v Jirgi".* 



=: = B:-:::::::::...|t. ciaj. -.-.^astst ^.-is 

Lennedy, Anna^ U°T^,^°n' . ' ". '. '. '. . . Normal 



ft 

* fennedy, Blanche ' ! McLean iNormai 

[' Inned^: Hannah Ellen Mian . Pana 

: ^tZtil' Ruth ■•••:::::::::: iaXakee : : st Anne 

^onnpfl^'Trpne Woodford •„ P,=^I1°^* 

.ennell, irene Bureau Tiskilwa 

?"!!,«:•. ^x'^.-v ■/ • ::::::::::: JorT'f. Roberts 



[enward, Nancy 



McLean Bloomington 



I 



Kneale, Pearl 
Knecht, Kathi 

Knell, Hattie May ^rv^r" -Rlnominffton 

Knobeloch, Anna Louise ^cLj^n Bloomington 



ttnS Kathryn- i i 1 ! 1 1 ! l ^ gn ! ! ! ! ! :::::..._ Sayhroo. 

ierr, Florence A Henry ^^.^^ 

^err, Jessie M McLean ***..'.... Bloomington 

ll>S?'-'''::n;':ii:SH:;::::::::."tt 

zZ^ufv Lide * ■ : McLean Normal 

irif^Sr ••::::::: : :Sr . .•.•.•.•.-.•.•.• Bioom^SS^n 

iessler, (^race mae Gnggsville 

l&4?fK- :::::::::::: :E vLgston ..... _. _. ..^^ 

l?cT\r^7.: . : ::::::::::: :Sf . ........ . _wasMn,ton 

l&SS : : :, : : : : : : : :~ ••■;;.•.• Putnam 

|-«[4&&ia- : : : : :« : : : : : : : : -st sv. S 

Ki?ctae^r°'Ma?ie L ' ! ! ! '. ! i ! ! ! ! ! ".McLean •.•.■;.•.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■..■ Normal 

lll^onTldnaX Mf . .\\\\- : : i : : : ' K^nSl 



Kline, Garnet Opal 



Kankakee Reddick 



Kluckholm, Olive A ^""'":q'^rcrvr Thpster 

Knapp, Ethel Mae Randolph . . •••••;•;;; -gChe^ter 

Kneale, Pearl i^ oi a rpq cnn 

Knecht Katherine Irene Logan. Fdinbu^S 

iFr,;^ii irotfiP Mav Christian • J^amDurg 



Knowles, Maude Mane 



.Macon • Elwm 

.Tazewell Tremont 



fKraushaar, Katharine wV 1 *. '. ! '. ! Hancock ^opekl 

Kreiling, Augusta Anna Mason ^. , iopeKa 



Koch, Sophia Kurth t^^ •'';.' n Cullom 

Koerner, Madeline Livingston Lullom 

Kohrmai 
Kohrt, M 
Korb, Hf 
Krausha 
Kreiling, 
Kritz, L; 
Krommi: 

Kuch, Beainoe otjiueic ±^^ " — ; ■ - Haknta 

Kuhnke, Grace Clarissa ^^^f^^^^'"'' Bloomington 

Kumler, Margaret McLean ^ oomington 

Kumpf, Anna pS ' " . . • Peoria 

Kupel, Johanna Peor a "- Brimfield 

La Follette, Ada J., ili Carlvle 

Lampen, Isabelle SP^^??. vkk{ kt Louis 

Lalumier, Adele Marie St. Clair East hi. J^ouis 



Kohrman. Lena Mason Havana 

thern : 

larine W 

ta Anna 

K;iih:"BeiSice"^^l' ::::::: is^witt- :;:::::.... Farmer city 



Kohrt, Mabel Cathern LaSalle ^Seneca 

Korb, Helen L 

Kraushaar, Katharine 
Kreiling, Augusta An 

Kritz, Laura 

Kromminga, Henrietta 



:Korb, Helen L Logan, Lincoln 

fe^z'"£kuia'"''" ^°"" .:::::: : Shoun • ; : ; : : : : : : : : ' Bat^htVwn 

\¥r-±r^^Z^ Henrietta . . ! Logan _ ;u Hartsl'H!^? 



176 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPPTQ 

Landram, Bessie Macon postoffis 

Landsdown, Edna * " VermnioA xP^^^tuij 

Landwehr, Estella G. . . .Adams RossyillJ 

Lange, Lydia tosfn u 9H;°<^> 

Lankton, Ruth . . . . ! MofSn Hartsburg 

Larrick, Caroline Letitia ...'::;* Mcllln n{r.Z^^^!^^ 

Larson, Almeda Bu 4u BloomingtoD|g^ 

Latham, Winona ! .Tazewell ^'^'Tl'^'W- 

Laugharn, Besse Mae ! . Xogin f^'h'° 

Lauritson Florence Vera McLean * .* .' .' .' .' .' .* ' * * * Arrow.m1?h 

Lawm, Edna M. . Mnriicnn /V' .y^^^''"«r 

Lawrence, Ethel Anita' .* ! ! ! ! .' : ! ! S '?^. ] ; ; ; ^^V'^^e Cityfc * 

Lawson, Bertha Leona Pike ul^ 

Lawson, Vena Frances '.,'.'. McLean n^.^ , 

Lawton, Ollie Isola .Alexander' '.'.'.•.•. ^S 

Laxton, Pear Macounin n i ^^^^ 

Leach, Elsie Corinne .' ! ! Tazevvell Ar^l'^J'^ 

Leach, Mae Elizabeth Will Armingtpn 

Leamy, Agnes .' .'LaSalle' '.*.'.■.*.'.'. Ottawa 

Leathers, Crist e Mason <^ttawa 

Lee, Dollie Dean .' * Edgar rh?^^^'^ 

Lee, Irma B Kankak'p'e Chr sman 

Lee, Marion Teresa '. . ::::::::::l!&'^^^, ;;;;;. ifj^^^cuy 

LeeTh' Ma[flda ^V'''''' ....:::::::'. ^Owane ^ 

Llg'pa™^;;::;;;;:: Sn^ :••• coifax 



Le^iirMVs^'Marion ';:;;::: i^^^^Sck '::;;;;::;;: .^^^?tS 

Modesto 



Le Marr Nora Dell Macoupin Modesto 

Lemon, Mrs. Fay McLean iVioaesto 



Le Rette Mae Grundy . "•• Morris 

Lesch, Adele Vermilion Danville 

Lesch, Lma C Vermilion .... .' ; ' Danv le 

Lester, Juanita Moultrie Dallas Citv 



Lewis, Queene Elizabe't'h '.'.'.'.'.'.'.Bureau *.'.' '. T°aHH 

Lewis, Verna Louise \inrcron '^u.^^r 



;erna Louise Morgan 



Lewis, Helen .^., Peoria Peoria 

. Ladd 

Light, Vera . . ....'. Fdear Chapin 

Liieness, Mami'e* •.•.•.•.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.•.'.•.Gr^rdy' •.'.•.•.•.•;;;.•;; ' ^&nt? 

Likness, Anna Grundv Rrooi?.nir 

Lilly, Eva Clark .' . i ! .' Kankakee ' .' .' .' .' : .' :[" %lTencl 

Lmbarger, Mrs. Edna F Mason San Jose 

pS&,^L^h e: •;.'.'.'.'.'.'.;^^^^^^i) •;;••••.• • ^ ' t^ 

Litchfield, Ethel 1 . iMar'hall' 1 '. ! .' ! ! ! ! Tolu?a 

Litchfield Ruth Irene Marshall ..... [ [ [ [ [ ' To uca 

Litherland, Lenora M Wabash Allendale 

Litt e Marjorie McLean ' Ncfrmal 

Littlefield, Ertrel Christian ....;. bwan^co 

Livingston Carrie Mae Vermilion 1 vet 

^^°T^' A- ^?^^5^ McLean Bloo'mington 

Lockhart, Margaret Madison Amamb?a 

Logan, Greba Theone Tazewell Pekin 

te?' pw^'/t'''^- Macoupin .'. .; 'carlinville 

Loges, Flora Louise Macoupin Carlinville 

Lohmann, Laura E Ford Gibson Ciiv 

Long, Cecile Marie Piatt . ........•.•/;. . 'oeLand 

Long, Johanna Madison Edwardsville 

Long, Mary Ellen Madison Edwa?dsv I 



Illinois state Normal University 177 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

ng, Sue G Pike Pittsfield 

uden, Nellie E Hancock Warsaw 

udin, Bess Wabash Mt. Garmel 

udon. Janet Elizabeth McLean Bloomington 

vel, Pearl Jane Greene Rockbridge 

veless, Lila Elizabeth Macoupin Garlinville 

vett, A. Blanche Iroquois Onarga 

we, Mrs. Roy E Peoria- Peoria 

we, Sara Jane Grundy Braceville 

wry, Ethnel McLean Leroy 

wry, Mary L Champaign Long View 

teas, Theresa Macoupin Girard 

idwig, M. Maylou Stephenson Freeport 

leppe, Bernadine Clinton Carlyle 

ipton, Marie Helen Christian Taylorville 

Lsher, Jessie McLean Gridley 

erla, Ava Juanita Montgomery Irving 

on, Elsie Peoria Elmwood 

ons, Marcella M Livingston Gullom 

ons, Mary A Woodford El Paso 

ons, Sarah McLean Bloomington 

Allister, Rebecca Marshall Henry 

Bride, Ethel Ruth Tazewell Hopedale 

Gabe, Emma Mabel Livingston Pontiac 

Gabe, Laura La Delia Livingston Pontiac 

Carty, Enda Sangamon Riverton 

Garty, Malinda Morgan Murrayville 

Gauley, Vivian Vermilion Hoopeston 

Gleary, Helene Mabel Menard Greenview 

Glellan, Frae Inez Mercer Aledo 

Glelian, Ruth Mercer Aledo 

Gonnell, Lydia Alta Greene Roodhouse 

Gonnell, Nelle E Douglas Areola 

Cord, Jennie McLean Normal 

Goy, Nellie Kankakee Bradley 

Cue, Hazel Maurine McLean Bloomington 

Gulloch, Nita Knox Galesburg 

Gune, Margaret Esther McLean Chenoa 

Devitt, Minnie Piatt Monticello 

Donald, Ina May Grundy Gardner 

Donald, Mary Sue Wabash Mt. Garmel 

icDonald, Sadie G Will Elwood 

Donough. Celotis Iroquois Milford 

Dowell, Chrissie McLean Normal 

Dowell, Nova Nina McLean Normal 

Elheny, Elizabeth Blanche ...McLean Bloomington 

Elroy, Carolyn Florence Cass Arenzville 

Gee, Harriet Evelyn Shelby Moweaqua 

Ginnis, Cecilia Kankakee Kankakee 

Gough, Catherine Lucile Logan Lincoln 

Graw, Cecil McLean Bloomington 

Guire, Julia Agnes Macon Decatur 

Kay, Fidalis Iroquois Clifton 

Kay, Lou Belle Mason Manito 

Kay, Rosa Iroquois Clifton 

Kay, Veronica Iroquois Clifton 

Kean, Anna Stark Bradford 

Kean, Ethel Jasper Newton 

Kee, Evelyn Eugenie Woodford Washburn 

Kibben, Arietta Gertrude Edwards West Salem 

Knight, Mrs. Elfriede Macoupin Gillespie 

Kown, Hazel Fern Peoria Monica 



1 



178 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME 

McLauchlan, Blanche Will 



COUNTY 



POSTOFFIS 

Joli 



McLernon, Bernadine 

McMahan, Ethel Lena 

McMahon, Edde La June 

McMahoii, Margaret Alice . . . 
McManus, Mrs. Laura Frances 

MacMillan, Sarah Jane 

McMillen, Geneva A 

McMillen, Hazel 

McMillen, Martha 

McMullin, Marie 

McNeff, Clara 



.Knox Galesbui 

Morgan Waver 

Marshall Lace 

Marshall Lace 

Madison Collinsvil 

Macon Decati 

Piatt De Lar 

Peoria Princevil 

Piatt De Lar 

Menard Petersbui 

Livingston Chatsworl 

McNeff, Nellie Livingston Chatsworl 

McPartlin, Margaret Will Joli- 

McQuilkin, Margaret Sangamon Springfie 

M-cReynolds, Emma Montgomery Litchfie 

McWhinnie, Agnes Macoupin Virde 

Mackey, Minnie May Warren Monmouf 

Mackintosh, Frances J Kankakee Bourbonna 

Macon, Winnie Marshall Sparlar 

Macy, Frayda McLean Norm 

Macy, Mable Nadine Macon Decati 

Madison, Bertha Ogle Po 

Madison, Marthe Ghryste Iroquois Cliftc 

Mahood, Dollie Carroll Mt. Carre 

Maile, Anna E. E Kankakee Union Hi 



Mallary, Jessie 

Mailing, Cora , 

Malone, Mary 

Mammen, Marie J 

Manahan, Mrs. Nelly 

Manchester, Miriam Flora 

Manker, Ottilia L 

Manker, Theil 

Mann, Lena Naomi 



Marshall Hem 

Peoria Peor 

(Ohio) Golumbi 

Logan Emde 

Iroquois Wellingtc 

McLean Norm 

Pike Pittsfie 

Peoria Princevil 

Sangamon Lowd( 

Mann, Lillian St. Clair East St. Lou 

Manning, Ina Lawrence St. Francisyil 

Manspile, Addie Mary 

Mantle, Alice Ebba 

Manus, Dora 

Manus, Marie Louise 

Mapes, Ella M 

Markham, Florence A _ ^, . ^ 

Markland, Henrietta J McLean Bloommgte 

Marks, Anna LaSalle Wenoi 

Marr Belva McLean Bloommgto 

Marr Iva McLean Bloomingtc 

Marshall, Blanche Kankakee Momenc 

Marshall, Grace Rozella Henderson Stronghurs 

Marshall, Mable Gertrude .. 

Marshall, Marie Elsie 

Martin, Amy Mildred 

Anna 

Elizabeth 

Helen E 

Lauree 



Champaign Sidm 

Madison Trc 

Logan Emdf 

Logan Emde 

Henry Annawe 

Sangamon Rivertc 



DeWitt Waynesvil. 

Tazewell Minie 

Brown Versaille 

Peoria Peon 

Madison Godfre 

. Putnam Granvil 

Iroquois Claytonvil! 

Madison Collinsvil. 



Martin, 
Martin, 
Martin, 
Martin, 

Martin, Leonore ^ , 

Martin, Myrtle Pike Bayl: 

Martin, Stella M Peoria Brimfiel 

Mason, Esther McLean Bloommgto 

Massey, Bessie Yerna Grundy Morr 

Masters, Hattie Morgan Jacksonvil 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 179 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPFIS 

theny, Mabel Macon Decatur 

thew, Eula L McLean Normal 

this, Edith Berneice Livingston Ancona 

tthews, Faye B Vermilion Rossville 

eimer, Blanche Marie Macoupin Brighton 

well, Ruth Champaign Broadlands 

. er, Marie Morgan Jacksonville 

yes, Madeleine McLean Bloomington 

ayfield, Lola Lana Iroquois Milford 

ead, Fadelia Louise Tazewell Pekin 

eade, Grace Vermilion Oakwood 

eehan, Tessie Peoria Brimfield 

egowen, Ethel Marie Madison Alton 

eils, Ada Ruth Livingston Flanagan 

einecke, Hazel Christian Taylorville 

ellor, Samantha Peoria Peoria 

erchant, Cora McLean Normal 

ercier, Louise Iroquois Clifton 

erris, Zeta Marie Scott Bluffs 

erritt, Louise Marshall Varna 

essinger, Evelyn Champaign Champaign 

etcalf, Fannie Pike Barry 

etz, Edith Montgomery Nokomis 

etzger, Florence Will Joliet 

eyer, Caroline Iroquois Loda 

eyer, Ethel M Adams Quincy 

eyer, Marie McLean Bloomington 

ichel, Emma Dorothea (Missouri) Kirkwood 

ichel, Friede M Madison Madison 

iddleton, Clare Frances Marion Salem 

ikel, Eleanore Emeline (Kentucky) Clinton 

lies, Grace Marshall Sparland 

iller, Delia M Cumberland Toledo 

iller, Erline St. Clair Lebanon 

iller, Frances Mary Sangamon New Berlin 

iller, Hazel F Macon Decatur 

iller, Hortense Macon Cisco 

iller, Mrs. Irma Gerdes Tazewell Pekin 

iller, Janet Bee McLean Bloomington 

iller, Jennie June Ogle Polo 

iller, Mrs. Lena Vermilion Rankin 

iller, Lura Peoria Monica 

iller. Marguerite Esther McLean Bloomington 

iller, Marie Morgan Waverly 

iller, Martha G. E Knox Galesburg 

iller, Mary Genevieve Iroquois Milford 

iller, Mary Isabel Champaign Philo 

iller, Mildred Livingston Pontiac 

iller, Ruth Iroquois Milford 

illeson, Grace Peoria Peoria 

ills. Hazel DeWitt Kenney 

ills, Ida Leona Macon Decatur 

ills, Lottie M Livingston Cornell 

ilstead, Venah Beatrice McLean Normal 

Iner, Rhoda May Tazewell Pekin 

mk, Julia Pike New Salem 

inton, Gladys Lucile DeWitt Clinton 

itchcll, Beulah E McLean Bloomington 

)ichell, Pearl Greene White Hall 

oberly, Grace L Cook Chicago 

offet, Clyde Grant Sangamon Springfield 

ohler, Jessie (Texas) Hunt 



180 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



1 

OFPlI 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFPI 

Molohon, Geneva Elizabeth Sangamon Paw e 

Montgomery, Bernice M McLean Blooming n 

Montgomery, Blanche La Salle Da 

Montgomery, Emma Ethel McLean Blooming n 

Montgomery, Irene DeWitt GUdq 

Montz, Elsie Arminta Ford Rob(,8 

Moore, Mrs. C. W McLean Stanf d 

Moore, Ivah Ellen Pike Griggs\ e 

Moore, Josephine Harriet Livingston Oil 

Moore, Nettie Edith Sangamon Chatln 

Moore, Pearle Frances Franklm Benn 

Moran, Esther Grundy Coal ( y 

Moran, Mary Stark Wyomg 

Moratz, Bernadine Amelia McLean Blooming n 

Morehouse, Winifred McLean Noril 

Morgan, Ethel Marshall Wena 

Morgan, Martha Frances Pike P(.i 

Morris, Annis Elva LaSalle Toi a 

Morris, Pearl Fayette Brownstc n 

Morris, Vernie Gorene White Gaii 

Morrissey, Margaret Piatt Gales\.e 

Morrison, Ethyl Ford Pasn 

Morrison, Faye Ford Pasn 

Mortimer, Flo Vera McLean Nor il 

Mosbarger, Pauline Piatt Atw d 

Moschel, Anna Tazewell Mom 

Moser, Helen Macon Ma n 

Mosgrove, Pearl Piatt Montic o 

Mote, Bessie B Iroquois Wats a 

Mott, Hazel Gladys Iroquois Gilr.ii 

Moulton, Gharity Marshall ;,.^?P-^ 

Moulton, Ruby M W^oodford Washbn 

Mudd, Alice Irene Scott Winche t 

Mudd, Eola Marie Henderson, Stronghi^t 

Mueller, Verna McLean Bloomin^n 

Mueller, Viola McLean Blooming n 

Mueller, Vita Scott Blfs 

Mulvaney, Josephine Kankakee Kanksse 

Mundel, Hazel Gladys Woodford Eur:a 

Mundhenke, Ethel Christain Morrisomie 

Murdie, Zeta Jeannette Will Manha n 

Murphy, Estella Gatharine Peoria Pc a 

Murray, Alta Grey Woodford Metarr-a 

Murray, Elizabeth Vermilion Hoope. n 

Murrav, Forrest Kent Vermilion Hoope.n 

Murray, Ruth Ellen Iroquois Gissna Pk 

Muzzy, Beatrice Lee Livingston OU 

Nail, Evaughn Ghristian Morrisomie 

Nail, Stella Belle Christian MorrisonMe 

Nance, Cora Edna Cook Hary 

Neal, Opal A McLean Ley 

Neathery, Joyce Fayette Vand a 

Neff, Bertha Martha Tazewell v;--,u ! 

Netf, Francis Beryl Mason ^^%^'a 

Neher, Nellie McLean Che^a 

Neidigh, Wastella Lawrence Sun^r 

Neill, Irma Carrie Peoria Ghillicce 

Nelson, Abbie Pearl Henry <jen('^o 

Nelson, Ada Champaign i^^ 

Nelson, Agnes Louise Champaign ChampcU 

Nelson, Esther Christine Vermilion Hoope^'U 

Nelson, Sylvia Livingston Gul^i 



Urn 






Broi 



Illinois State Normal University 181 

NAME COUNTY POSTOPFIS 

Neuman, Cecelia Mayme Grundy Seneca 

Nevin, Lottie Pearl St. Glair Marissa 

Nevins, Florence Helen McLean Bloomington 

Nevitt, Harriett Shepherd. ..... Knox Galesburg 

iNewell, Argy Leal Peoria Peoria 

Newell, Mildred Ionia Iroquois Cissna Park 

Newkirk, Frieda Elizabeth Will Joliet 

Newman, Ida Belle (Missouri) Bunceton 

Newman, Tressie V McLean Danvers 

Newton, Ruth Woodford Metamora 

Nichols, Esther Peoria Elmwood 

Nitsche, Anna Madison Edwardsville 

Nixon, Faye Miriam Tazewell Deer Greek 

Norris, Ethel M Grundy Braceville 

Norris, Leta McLean Normal 

Norsworthy, Lillian Irene Wabash Mt. Garmel 

Norton, Goral Mae Woodford Eureka 

jNosker, N. Grace Iroquois Iroquois 

INoteboom, Grace L Lake Zion Gity 

jOakes, Geneva Dell Kankakee Kankakee 

jOakes, Mabel Macon Maroa 

jO'Beirne, Margaret Marshall Toluca 

O'Brien, Evelyn Putnam Putnam 

lO'Brien, Margaret Mary McLean Bloomington 

[O'Gonnell, Laura Ford Piper Gity 

O'Connor, Marguerite LaSalle Ottawa 

P'Donnell, Isabel Jersey Grafton 

fO'Farrell, Kathleen Vermilion Alvin 

Olander, Anna Marshall Toluca 

Dldaker, Ethel M Logan Atlanta 

Oldaker, Jessie I Logan Atlanta 

Oliver, Mabel Will Braidwood 

Oliver, Nella Frances McLean Leroy 

Olsen, Hazel L McLean Normal 

D'Neill, Mary V Grundy Dwight 

Onken, Anna H Iroquois Buckley 

Onnen, Hannah Woodford Minonk 

i3'Rourke, Eugenia McLean Bloomington 

Osborn, Edith Esther Sangamon Auburn 

Osenton, Edna Feme Sangamon Buffalo 

Oswald, Lillie Bond Pocahontas 

Ott, Gladys Victoria Tazewell Tremont 

Otto, Viola M McLean Normal 

Oyler, Amanda Elizabeth Piatt Bement 



Bioa 
M 

3 



.01 
ii 






Page, Laura W Grundy Morris 

Palmer, Frances A Macon Decatur 

Palmer, Gladys Will Custer Park 

Papenhaus, Elsie Tazewell Morton 

Park, Lillian M Iroquois Loda 

Park, Retta Alline Shelby Moweaqua 

Parker, Dolpha Warren Monmouth 

iParks, Agnes Margaret Will Joliet 

Parks, Mabel Louisa Greene Greenfield 

Parsons, Cecil Dorothy Madison Granite City 

Patterson, Clara Pearl Mason Mason City 

Patterson, Jessie Marie McLean Bloomington 

Patterson, Ruby McLean Leroy 

Payne, Lillie Mae Jasper Newton 

Peabody, Irene Woodford Washburn 

Peard, Viola M Stark Wyoming 

Peck, Estella McLean Chenoa 

Peck, Ida I Montgomery Raymond 



182 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



i 



NAME COUNTY P08TOFFI8 

Peck, Ruth Scott Logan Atlat. 

Peck, Spray Montgomery Raymoi 

Pennepacker, Hazel Montgomery Nokon 

Penner, Gladys Eloine McLean Bloom ingt 

Pennington, Feme DeWitt Clint 

Perkins, Iva Marie Jasper Advan 

Perrill, Lucille Tazewell Pek 

Perrin, Eva A McLean Norir. 

Perry, Alice Jane Livingston DwIl 

Perry, Florence L Henry Genes 

Perry, Helen Gertrude Brown Mt. Sterli 

Perry, Rhua Lucille Madison Granite Ci 

Peters, Else Logan Lincci 

Peters, Mae Eileen Marion Sando' 

Peters. Nelle Mary Edwards West Sal 

Peterson, Thalia Lucille Kankakee Momen 

Peterson, Alta Corinne Monard Petersbu 

Petri, Jessie Beatrice Woodford Eure 

Pettit, Marion Esther Bureau Nepon 

Petty, Philena Margaret Lawrence Lawrencevij., 

Pfenninger, Lena Pike Mil 

Pforr, Nora Coles Charlesi 

Phipps, Madge White Cari 

Piaszek, Marie LaSalle Weno; 

Pickens, Verna Alice Xdains Plainvii 

Pickering, Miriam McLean Norm 

Pierce, Arlic McLoan Bloom ingt^ 

Pierce, Glenna F Chrisl ian Edinbu 

Pierson, Bertha Putnam Putna 

Pike, Agnes McLean Arrowsrni 

Pike, Marv Cecelia McLean Arrowsini 

Pilchard, Beulah Piatt Mansfic 

Pinchert, Lydia Marie DiiPage Bonsenvi' 

Pinchert, Marie Elizabeth On Page Bensenvil 

Pittenger, Lola Ann Christian Owane> 

Place, Jean R Stephenson Frecpo 

Place, Marie Louise Stephenson Freepo 

Plankenhorn, Gladys May Piatt Weld* 

Plato, Anna Madison Granif*^ Ci 

Pop, Lula M McLean BelUlow 

Pollard, Rena Warren Monmou 

Pollack, Elsie May i Missouri^ La Gran 

Pond, Faytima Sangamon Springfie 

Pond, Reha Morgan Meredos 

Porch, Edna L Douglas Tusco 

Porter. Maud H Madison St Jac( 

Porterfield, Alice L McLean Norm 

Potter, Minnie Leah Macon WarrensbuJ 

Potter, Rubv May Pike Bayl 

Potts, Ethel L McLean Norm 

Potts, Katherine Winifred McLean Norm 

Powell, x\gnes Madison Altc 

Powell. Cora Madison Collinsvil 

Powell. Grace Marshall Spe^ 

Powell, Mabelle Madison Collinsvil 

Powers, Alice Josephine (India) Madui 

Powers, Grace McLean Lerc 

Povnter, Trella Tazewell Washingtc 

Pregaldin, Judith S Calhoun Hardi 

Prewett, Maud Alma Pporia Peer; 

Price, Edna Nellie Wabash Mt. Carm- 

Prillmayer, Katherine BrowTi Mt. Sterlir 



t 



Illinois State Normal University 183 



- Rar- 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

ringey, Murrel McLean Bioomington 

V ritchett, Mary Madison Troy 

BL ■ Tobst, Bertha St. Glair New Athens 

^^ Tuisner, Minnie Marshall Wenona 

'■";* urdum, Ella Belle Ford Piper City 

"■ % urdum, Ida Mae Ford Piper City 

M :'url, Gallie May Greene Carrolton 

'■" li'utman, Hazel E Vermilion Henning 

■■";''' 'utman, Lucy Eleanora Brown Mt. Sterling 

yi ^j 'utnam, Luella Edgerton McLean Normal 

-^'"-■■- 'yatt, Elie Kreigh Morgan Jacksonville 

'^'"^p ' luackenbush, Cecile Floy Iroquois Milf ord 

■ iuigley, Mabel E St. Clair Belleville 

luinlan, May Catherine Champaign Tolono 

iuinn, Kathlyn Woodford Minonk 

lader, Maude M Madison Granite City 

iae, Frances Marshall Sparland 

lae, Helen Marshall Sparland 

laich, Carrie Pauline Hancock Warsaw 

lainwater, Ethel Elizabeth Pike Pittsfield 

lalston, Christie Anna Ford Piper City 

lalston, Mildred McLean Lexington 

lamp, Jennie Marshall Lacon 

lamsay, Edith M LaSalle Dana 

lamsay, Ruth R LaSalle Dana 

Randolph, Clara F Tazewell Green Valley 

landolph, Florence Gertrude . . . Pope Golconda 

tapp, Bessie Miles Tazewell Washington 

lasmusen, DuWana Christine . .Kankakee Momence 

lasmussen, Ruth R Kankakee Grant Park 

lathje, Hulda Dorothea Will Peotone 

lay, Stella Vera Vermilion Danville 

laycraft, Irene McLean Bioomington 

laymond, Eleanor Iroquois St. Anne 

lead, Ermyn M Vermilion Hoopeston 

i>U lead, Grace Lee Woodford Eureka 

Fwif leagan, Bessie Marion Centralia 

" ' iecord, Gladys Marie Fulton Farmington 

leed, Elsie Ann Morgan Jacksonville 

leed, Viola Marguerite McLean Bioomington 

ileeder, Gladys M LaSalle Kangley 

... .leeder, Ruth Elizabeth Scott Winchester 

M leaves, Helena Minerva Pike Griggsville 

™ leeves, Luella Pike Griggsville 

T^i leilly, Anna Stastia Greene Roodhouse 

im leinhard, Marie Margaret Livingston Cullom 

m ileinhardt, Katherine Louise . . . Peoria Peoria 

!g§ 'leische, Mattie Brown Hersman 

„■ [leitz, Nellie Willamine Menard Petersburg 

!■ lemster, Pearl Josephine Voi'inilion Hoopeston 

)[■ lender, Elizabeth Woodford ElPaso 

,M 'lethorn, Eula Louisa Cass Chandlerville 

ajLleynolds, Ellie Elizabeth Fnrd Gibson City 

^™p^nolds, Jessie Sangamon Maxwell 

a^Bgniolds, Leone Champaign St. Joseph 

I^Mpe, Belle Knnkakee Momence 

IHmbe, Florence Frances Edgar Chrisman 

liipiichards, Carrie Eleanor Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Ir-^ liclint'ds, Ch;n'lol,te Hazel Lake Zion City 

.Uchards, Stella J. • Morgan Murrayville 

Richardson, Opal Clare Iroquois Donovan 

llichardson, Ruby Florence Iroquois Donovan 



184 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Richardson, Ruth Elizabeth Ogle Forrest 

Richter, Edna Helena Peoria Peoi 

Rickards, Alice J Kankakee Kankak 

Riley, Berenice Fay Menard Greenvi( 

Riley, Julia Mary Gallatin Ridgw 

Rinehart, Fae N McLean Bellflow 

Ring, Mrs. E. F Richland Not 

Riordan, Mary Jersey Graft 

Rioth, Catherine Lauretto Brown Mt. Sterli 

Rishel, Zella Henry Gambrid 

Roach, Mary Margaret McLean Danve 

Roady, Bertha May Greene Ka 

Roane, Wessie Lee Jefferson Opdy 

Robbins, Ada Bernice Henry Kewan 

Robbins, Mary McLean Bloomingtc 

Robbins, Pearl Mae Macon Niant 

Robbins, Virginia L Macon Niant 

Robert, Mabel Will Joli 

Roberts, Georgia Logan Mt. Pulas 

Roberts, OUie Marie Putnam Magnol 

Roberts, Zoe Hannah Piatt Gerro Gore 

Robertson, Fay L Montgomery Fillmo; 

Robinson, Clara Belle Logan Beasc 

Robinson, Elizabeth Wallace ...Greene Garrolltc 

Robinson, Mrs. Emma Randolph Bloomingtc 

Robinson, Lilian DeWitt Weldc 

Robinson, Nelle Elizabeth Christian Taylorvil 

Robinson, Sarah Greene Garrolltc 

Rock, Edna Glendolyn DeWitt Farmer Gi, 

Rock, Lida Alice Woodford Sect 

Rodenbeck, Hannah E Montgomery Litchfie! 

Rodman, Mildred Permelia McLean Bloomingtc 

Roe, Helen Rebekah McLean Bloomingtc 

Rogers, Ethel Franklin Ewir 

Rohweder, Helen Douglas Tuscoi 

Rol, Icy lone Iroquois Sheldo 

Rollins, Esther Viola Bureau Sheffiel 

Roney, Mrs. Margaret E. Showers Macon Decati 

Rood, Mrs. Elizabeth Woodford Minon 

Root, Susan Verne Brown VersailL' 

Rorer, Clara Bell Iroquois Gilma 

Rose, Elizabeth Theresa McLean Bellflowf 

Rose, Elsie Coral Shelby Windsc 

Rose, Isel Fern Schuyler Rushvil 

Rose, Mollie Christian Palme 

Rosenberger, Martha Jane Cass Beardstow 

Ross, Lillian Tazewell Peki 

Ross, Myra Tazewell Peki 

Rotramel, Maud Ford Paxto: 

Rotramel, Prudence Elizabeth . . Ford Paxto: 

Rowlands, Ruth G McLean Lexingtoi 

Ruble, Florence Macon Decatu 

Ruby, Dora Lawrence Sumne 

Ruschke, Olga Sangamon Aubun 

Rush, Hattie Pike Pittsfieh 

Russell, Clara M Morgan Jacksonvill* 

Russell, Mary E Ford Robert; 

Ryan, Estella Grundy Coal Cit: 

Ryan, Ida Kathryn Tazewell Tremon 

Ryan, Mary Bureau TiskilwJ 

St. John, Eva Iroquois Watseb 

Sallenbach, Vivian Will Jolie 



Caml)5 



M 



Illinois State Normal University 



185 



NAME 



POSTOFPIS 



COUNTY 

McLean Bloomington 



^^te^Ai^?''^^^ Emden 

aSpson, Mary Ellison St Clair M?^rr7ri.^L^ 

amuels, Elsie May Wabash Mt. Carmel 

.ganders, Esther Ford ^^t?11S 

*^arff, Eula Tazewell Pek n 

ater, Mabel Logan Atlanta 

n j.avage, Catherine J Logan ^i^S?^^ 

^^;awyer, Matilda Washington Ashley 

.cannell, Viola Hancock J^^Va 

carcliff, Oma R Peoria Glasford 

lnn.iM>chachtsiek, Bertha Adams 8^-!?SX 

'°^^J ichachtsiek, Myrtle Adams Qumcy 

•• " Ichade, Marie Emelia St. Clair Belleville 

• ^; kchaefer, Lillian McLean Bloomington 

'^rj': Ikhaeffer, Maree (Michigan) Iron Mountain 

Y^ Jcheffler, Emma Alice Minna . . .Sangamon Springfield 

3? Bchemel, Alma Pike Pittsfield 

^'^o? (5chlabach, Gladys McLean Norma 

•^1^ 5chlabach, Mildred McLean Normal 

•; ^ Jchleder, Norma E Tazewell ,.?^^^^ 

,^ Schneider, Clara Woodford ^^™^^ 

T,f Schneider, Gussie Pauline Hancock Carthage 

: f- [khneider, Susie Woodford -o^^Pi^^^ 

^fi] 5chneman, Elsie E Stark Bradford 

^^»™ Bchrear, Edna Macon Warrensburg 

^^^[ ^chroeder, Laura Florenedine . .Edwards Grayyille 

v.; ^chroeder, Verna Greene Carrollton 

^ ^>chryver, Ruth M Will Joliet 

oomu Schubert, Mary Marshall Henry 

"^^^ i^chueth, Mae Irene McLean Bloomington 

■■■} 5chultz, Ruth Macon Argenta 

• Tii Schutter, Effie Kankakee Kankakee 

■ 1^ Schweitzer, Irene LaSalle Peru 

■ i^liel Schwesig, Emma St. Clair Belleville 

• 0«l5chwiderski, Frances Marshall Jo uca 

Schwiderski, Josephine Marshall ^X?\V^^ 

Scott, Ada M St. Clair Fallon 

Scott, Mrs. Alta M DeWitt ^^^^^^,^'^ 

Scott, Emma Elizabeth Morgan ?.^?;^^J^" 

_3cott, Grace I St. Clair Fallon 

RuiBScott, Lulu M McLean Ellsworth 

Scribner, Alta DeWitt Midland City 

Searles, Gertrude Macoupin Medora 

Secretan, Charlotte Peoria Peoria 

" ee, Aurora Thea Ola Kankakee Herscher 

3ee, Irene Melba Marion Kinmundy 

ISeed, Mary Ina Richland Olney 

ISeik, Mabel Irene Jersey Grafton 

eimer, Irma Frances Vermilion Rossville 

iSellards, Glenna lone DeWitt Waynesville 

jSellers, Eunice Pauline Macoupin Carlinville 

Sembell, Bertha Sangamon Springfield 

Sennett, Kathryn Harriet LaSalle Leeds 

Sereno, Pearl Grundy Coal City 

Sevier, Louise Madison Alton 

haddock, Elva Anna Macon Macon 

haffer, Edythe Jane DeWitt Weldon 

Sharp, Fern McDonough Blandinsville 

Sharpe, Leano F .Macon Warrensburg 

Sharpies, Dakota (Indiana) Warsaw 



1^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

g^aw, Genevieve DeWitt Clintoi 

Shaw, Mmnie A Warren MnTTrr^rr,,? 

Shea Elizabeth Swe^lf '. '. [ [ [ '. [ [ [ ! ; .""g^S 

gheehy, Anna Mae DeWitt Clinto 

Shelton Willa Mae Macoupin * Hetti? 

Shenk, Josephine L Will ...... Braidwnn 

Shepard, Beulah Putnam . . . '. \ [ [ [ ', [ Granvill 

Shepard, Mable M Putnam Granvill 

bhepherd, Lorine Livingston Fairbur^ 

Shepler, Martha Logan Beasor 

Sherden, May Henry Cambridge 

Sherman, Jean Marion Sandova 

Shimmin, Flossie Allien Kankakee Reddici 

Shmker, Margaret Champaign Ludlo\\ 

bhmker, Sylvia Champaign Ludlow 

bhireman Euliss McLean Bloomingtor 

Showers, Fannie Moultrie Bethany 

Shull, Inez Logan Lincoln 

Shuman, Helen Woodford ElPasc 

Shutt, Edith Pearl Macoupin McVey 

Shutt, Lolo Alberta Macoupin Virden 

Sibert, Pearl Louise Pike [ Baylis 

Sidenstricker, Anna Douglas Newman 

Sidwell, Ruby Gladys Calhoun Nebo 

Sies, Florence Elizabeth St. Clair Belleville 

Silberberg, Jean Bro\Am Mt Sterling 

Simons, Melcenia Hazelle McLean Bloomington 

Simpson, Gertrude Helen Woodford Eureka 

Simpson, Gladys Enola Christian Taylorville 

Simpson, Mabel Henderson Stonghurst 

Singer, Marie Livingston Cardiff 

Skaar, Sarah Ford Elliott 

Skinner, Elsie Elizabeth McLean Normal 

Slaten, Pluma Edith Jersey Grafton 

Sleezer, Marion Winifred Ford Paxton 

Slmn, Marion Estella Iroquois Chebanse 

Sloan, Catherine Champaign Ivesdale 

Sloan, Geraldine Aleta Iroquois Milford 

Sloan, Grace V Effingham Effingham 

Slonaker, Leta Vivian McLean Bloomington 

Small, Louise G Logan Lincoln 

Smallwood, Minnie L DeWitt Clinton 

Smith, Amelia Avis McLean Bellflower 

Smith, Bessie E Sangamon Springfield 

Smith, Bessie Elisabeth Bureau Tiskilwa 

Smith, Blanche L Sangamon Springfield 

Smith, Cecile Marie Sangamon Buffalo 

Smith, Cora Calhoun Batchtown 

Smith, Ethel Blanche Morgan Jacksonville 

Smith, Geneva Macon Decatur 

gmith, Georgia Douglas Newman 

Smith, Gertrude Earle Iroquois Clifton 

Smith, Isabeth Katherine Cass Beardstown 

Smith, Mamie Gertrude Macon Decatur 

Smith, Martha Louise Knox Gilson 

Smith, Nellie H Clay Louisville 

Smith, Ruth Esther Lawrence Sumner 

Smith, Susie Edith Iroquois Milford 

Smith, Sylvia Edna McLean Normal 

Smith, Thelma M Henderson Stonghurst 

Smitson, Helen M McLean Normal 



PFl) 



Illinois State Normal University 



187 



NAME 



lell, Marguerite 

^ j jiow, Pearl Ethel 

fS iiyder, Catherine 

lyder, Rea 

)hn, Clara 

)uth, Eunice LaFayette 

)uthard, Mary 

wers, Gladys L. 



COUNTY POSTOFPIS 

. Cass Chandlerville 

;.. Stark Wyoming 

. . .Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Clay Flora 

; ; ! Madison St. Jacob 

. . . Piatt Hammond 

Imthard, Mary Sangamon "^R^vli^ 
,wers, Gladys L Pike • Bayhs 

)arks, Anna ^S^'!^K' Ro.Prnond 

3arks, M. Fern Christian ^°1?^v?n 

Dear, Mina Ellen Vermilion Wn^?£w 

linaiiffer Louise Hancock Warsaw 

lelS: Mrr^McGinnis . . . .DeWitt ^^^^S^l 

oires, Lucy Helen ¥/oodford ^pS?h^ 

30on, Elizabeth M Peoria qi.Xrd 

3ringer, Bessie McLean ^ d^!S.^o 

Durck, Margaret Peoria n?^lt 

[Bige, Blanche Elizabeth Richland n ur.J 

ahl Elma Ford . -. V^^ i™ 

Mallard, Elsie Bond ^^^P^Jlo^ 

talter, Lena Mae Livingston ^^^^^^^^ 

:ambach, Agnes Woodford ^ n?^^ 

tambach, Frances Clara Woodford _. . . . ^^^^fso 

Lamm, LiUie E Tazewell • Morton 

tanford, Eula Clay Louisville 

tanger, Lois Reeves McLean Worma 

tansbury, Anna McLean Normal 

tarling, Bernice McLean Bloommgton 

teele, Flossie Ford Paxton ^ 

teers, Hazel Jeannette Bureau i?"^F^95 

tehr, Edna Kathryn Kankakee Bonheld 

tein, Florence E Will New Lenox 

tein, Ruth Marguerite Christian Pana 

iephens, Mary E Marshall • Henry 

tevens, Leah Ida Marion Centralia 

tevens, Lucy A Fulton a'"-\ ^J^-. 

tevens, Nellie B Madison Granite City 

tevenson, Bernardine McLean Bloommgton 

tewart, Elizabeth Jean Tazewell Tremont 

ticrwalt, Gladys Saline Galatia 

timson, Fay Fayette Vaindalia 

tine,' Nora Belle Greene Roodhouse 

iisJItine. Perna M Lawrence Sumner 

fffltokes, Ruth Lawrence ..?x?^^?J 

tone, Bessie Lee Pike Pittsfield 

toughton, Myrtle Janet Henry . Cambridge 

,tout Ina Lawrence St. Francisville 

towell, Mabel Peoria ChiUicothe 

itracke, Irma Agnes Hancock Warsaw 

.trange, Golda P Iroquois Onarga 

Itraube, Hilda Madison Alton 

Itrickle, Helen McLean Bloommgton 

Itroh, Lillie Mae Mason Kilbourne 

Itrong, Laura Ford P^^^°^ 

itrouse, Bertha Frances Champaign Rantoul 

;trykcr, Mary Elizabetb Tazewell Green Valley 

itubblefield, Lucile Mary McLean Bloommgcon 

itumm, Irene Tazewell Pekm 

Vturges. Effie Dorothy Macon Decatur 

>turges, Geneva Irene Macon Decatur 

jturgess, Marguerite I Fayette Vandalia 



l^S Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 



Su ivan, Mary Margaret McLean Bloomingti 

Sulhvan, Ne he Cecelia McLean B oom SItoi 

Summers Elizabeth Pearl Vermilion . . . . mdg& 

Suther and, Mary Leona Lawrence finmn^ 



I 



Sutherland Rosamond Lawrence Sumne 

Sutter, Bertha Emilie McLean BloomSi 

Sutter, Myrtle McLean Norma 

Sutton, Bertha B Hancock Dallas at> 

SuUon, Florence Woodford . ElPas 

Sutton, Nelhe Sangamon Springflel 

Swaim, Ada Clare McLean Gibson Gi 

Swam, Nancy Louise Logan Mt Pulask 

Swallow, Nellie Martha Fo?d ......' Gibson Cih 

Swanson, Esther Viola Bureau .... Tiskilw- 

Swanson, Gladys Louise Ford Paxf nr 

Swanson, Mabel Ford . . PaJfor 

Swanson, Ruth Rachel Henry . '. '. Orior 

Swarm, Hattie Livingston . .* .* .' '.'.'.[ [ ] ' Fairbun 

Swearmgen, Inez McLean McLean 

Sweeney, Bernardine McLean Bloomington 

Sweeney, Joanna McLean Bloomington 

Swigart, Verneil Elizabeth DeWitt Farmer Citv 

Swing, Lillian M . Mason ! ] . Mason City 

Swmg, Martha Louise Mason Mason Citv 

Tappe, Maysie . , McLean Bloomington 

Tappe, Nina Mane McLean Bloomington 

Taylor, Dovie Carl Peoria Peoria 

Taylor, Emily Florence (South Dakota) ...'..'.'/... Leadm 

Taylor, Florence Marshall LacoriK 

Tay or, Winifred Logan Lawndal^l!^ 

Taylor, Winifred Feme Sangamon Springfield 

Ternus, Josephine Amanda Stark Bradford 

Teske, Amy G McLean Bloomington 

Teter, Nelle Menard Greenview 

Teufel, Irma St. Clair Belleville* 

Tharp, Melya . Iroquois Milford# 

Theena, Emily Mary Woodford Metamora 

Theis Vera G Peoria Peoria 

Theobald, Tresa Woodford Metamora 

Thomas, Nma Bro^;\Ti Versailles'^ 

Thomas, Rhue Menard Oakfoi ' 

Thompson, Elizabeth Ivalon . . . Edwards West Sale. 

Thompson, Gladys I Ford Melvi: 

Thompson, Goldie A McLean V. Colfa: 

Thompson, Helen E St. Clair East St. LouL_ 

Thompson, Lottie Iroquois Loda" 

Thompson, Margaret Louise . . . Greene Roodhouse 

Thompson, Marguerite Iroquois Onarga 

Thompson, Sarah Agnes Montgomery Raymond 

Thompson, S. Ellen Madison Bethalto 

Thompson, Zada Ann Ford Melvin 

Threw, Susie Merle Peoria Elmwood 

Thurman, Opal Pike Pearl 

Thurnau, Eugenia Madison Edwardsville 

Thurston, Alma Florence Kankakee Manteno 

Thurston, Edna H Kankakee Manteno 

Tice, Mollie Elizabeth Menard Tice 

Tiffin, Genevieve Montgomery Walshville 

Titus, Mary Elizabeth Henrv Geneseo 

Tobey, Litta Macon Decatur 

Tobias, Grace May McLean Normal 



ria 

3raM 

le8(W 

eoM 



Illinois State Normal University 



189 



NAME 

ias, Hazel Delia 

\in, Kathryn Elizabeth 
^leau, Mary Blanche . . 
^ilm, Maud Louise . . . 
^tat. Iva Eulalia 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

. . . McLean Normal 

. . .Bureau Sheffield 

. . .Bureau Sheffield 

. . . Mason Mason City 

_ „ ... McLean Normal 

ladwayf Laura Edna McDonough Macomb 

wbridge, Lillian DeWitt Kenney 

ixel, Mary Louise Piatt Gerro Gordo 

ker, Myrtle Elizabeth Woodford Mmonk 

iner Edith Morgan Waverly 

iner! Fannie Virginia (Ohio) Zanesville 

ber, Feme Shirley Mason Havana 

iner Lucy Mae (Ohio) Zanesville 

tner, Lurel Mason Havana 

Iner, M. Irene McLean Normal 

[ner, Stella E Marshall Wenona 

iney, Nellie Greene Carrollton 

(tie Nora Iroquois WatseKa 

^er ' Alta Vermilion Muncie 

ier,' Irma Eleanor Vermilion Muncie 

Ser Rue S E McLean Bloommgton 

In,' Faun Saxon Livingston Flanagan 

irich, Flora Mae Grundy Braceyi le 

ierwod, Maude Marion Patoka 

fbert, Holly Jane Clay -Flora 

til Camp, Mary Elizabeth Iroquois Wellington 

idersand, Lena Greene Eldred 

idervoort, Verna McLean Heyworth 

111 Doren, Minet Cass Beardstown 

I Home, Zella Estelle Kankakee Grant Park 

I Holven, Margaret Rosina. . . Iroquois i^JH^o^^ 

Ness, Helen G McLean McLean 

light, Minnie B Macon Decatur 

Ich, Erma Dorcas Macon Oakley 

de, Jennie R Logan New Holland 

^kler, Lillian Belle Iroquois Cissna Park 

Vtrees, Ruth Helen Greene White Hall 

V,pa, Anna D Marshall Toluca 

V ter, Lorena Roberta Logan Mt. Pulaski 

Vll, Anna L Kankakee Manteno 

Vlano, Theresa Grundy Carbon Hill 

Vicent, Maria Vivienne McLean Bloomington 

V?el, Irene Woodford Benson 

\??elbacher, Josephine Ford Piper City 

\'i Tobel, Anna Tazewell Tremont 

^1. Tobel, Lydia W Henry Kewanee 

V^rhees, Anna Marshall Toluca 

Vibel, Marian Marshall Putnam 

Vibel, Mildred S Marshall Putnam 

Vide, Helen Cecelia Marion Vernon 

\idsworth, Marie K Tazewell Hopedale 

Viggoner, Marion Eugena St. Clair Lebanon 

\iit, Bernice Bond Greenville 

\ilden, Joyce Macoupin Girard 

\ildmier. Ruby Tazewell Minier 

\ilker, Livonia A Kankakee Momence 

\ilker, Roberta Audrey Piatt White Heath 

Ailkup, Eunice Earle McLean ;\'^ Normal 

A illace, Anna Franklin West Frankfort 

Aillace, Ida Lizzie Mason .,?^^^^? 

Aillace, Ida May Effingham Altamont 



190 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Wallace, Irene Marshall Hen 

Walace, Margaret Ursula Marshall ' Hen 

Wa lace, Ruth McLean V. Colfi 

Wa sh, Gathryn Mary LaSalle mi 

Walsh, Elizabeth LaSalle * bttav 

Walsh, Josephine Margaret Livingston CamDi 

Wa ter, Eva. Mae Sangamon New Berl 

Wa ter, Jessie Lea Sangamon New Berl 

Wa ters, Mrs. Carol Knox Maaur 

Wa tmire Luverne Tazewell Green Valh 

Waltrip, Blanche Champaign Urbar 

Wandel, Ada Mason Mason Cii 

Ward, Leonora Scott Exet^ 

Ward, Leora Beatrice Iroquois Crescent^ Gil 

^rfJ' ly'^V^"" -^^-^^^ • Iroquois Crescent Gil 

Warfield, Marie Elaine Piatt Cerro Gore 

Warner, Ethel Henry Kewane 

Warren, Dorothy E LaSalle Ogles^ 

Warren, Nellie Piatt Mansfiei 

Warren, Vienna Myrtle Clay Xenl 

Wason, Florence Iroquois '. . V.*.' Watsei 

Watkms, Nora . Douglas Newma 

Watkms Nora Gertrude Vermilion Fithia 

Watson, Mrs. Eliza Mason Mason Git 

Watson, Mayo Tazewell Peki 

WoH^p' Pu'^? ^' ^^^^on Central! 

Watt, Ruth Maurme Logan Atlant 

Watts Daphna Marion Centrab 

Waughop, Irma Marshall Sparlan 

Wealing, Mary Iroquois Tha^will 

Weaver, Elsie Tazewell Peki 

Webb, Maybelle Elsie Christian Assumptio 

Webber Leota Champaign Ludlow 

Weber, Elva . . . Madison Godfre 

Weber, Marguerite LaSalle LostaD 

Weber, Olivia M St. Clair Bellevill 

Webster, Aaro Vansant Iroquois Chebans 

Webster, Henrietta Winifred . . . Pike Pittsfiel 

Weedman, Elizabeth McLean Norma 

Weekly, Mrs OraB McLean Bloomingto 

weese, Dorothy Bernon ...... .White . . Carn: 

Weindel Florence C Madison *.".'.'.'.*.*. Alto 

We ch, Jeannie Elizabeth Fayette Ramse 

We ch, Lois . . McLean Bloomingtoi 

We ch Margaret Fayette Ramse: 

Welchlen, Maudella Grace McLean Rhirle^ 

Wenger, Lillian Madison Highlam 

Wenger, Mabel Madison Highlam 

Wenzel, Aletha Madison Upper Altor 

West, Lola Ellen Woodford Roanoke 

West Susie E Henry Cambridge 

Westbrooke, Daisy St. Clair East St. LouiJ 

West ake, Ruth Macon Maro? 

Westlund, Minnie Lorena Knox Victoria 

Wetmore Ruby June Fayette Shoboniei 

Wetze , Mabel Richland Parkersburg 

Wetzel, Maude Rex Greene Carrolltor 

Whalen, Agnes Marie Livingston Pontiac 

Wha en, Fannie Rose Macoupin Staunton 

Whalen, Mary A Pike Pearl 



0?: 



Illinois State Normal University 191 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

,„arrie, Jessie Grundy Coal City 

Jlieeler, Mrs. Olive Stone Macoupin Chesterfield 

Wheeler, Pearl Irene Sangamon Springfield 

eeler, Ruth Marion Patoka 

eeling, Katherine Henderson Stronghurst 

isler, Neva Kankakee Herscher 

^HKite, Eileen Woodford Washburn 

^■fcite' Ethel Iroquois Martinton 

ite, Mrs. George McLean Saybrook 

ite, Gertrude McLean Bloomington 

iiite, Gladys Geneva Montgomery Honey Bend 

hite, Gratia McLean Normal 

hite, Justina McLean Bloomington 

iiite, S. Ernestine Livingston Forrest 

hitehurst, Ona Menard Petersburg 

hitlock, Essie Lovell Marion Centralia 

hitmore, Ivy Naomi Montgomery Nokomis 

hittenberg, Clarice Sangamon Springfield 

hittenberg, Marjorie Sangamon Springfield 

hitwood, May McLean Bloomington 

ft'ai*iechert, Esther St. Clair Belleville 

h. liegand, Dollie Elnora Henderson Biggsville 

jiegreffe, Rachel Josephine Montgomery Barnett 

ightman, Gertrude McLean Ellsworth 

[ilber, Mrs. Amy Brown Mt. Sterling 

ilber, Gertrude Helen McLean Normal 

ilcox, Alice Virginia Sangamon New Berlin 

iley, Francis Lillian McLean Normal 

Iley, Grace Hancock Warsaw 
Ikinson, Bertha St. Clair Marissa 
lliams, Adith Jean LaSalle Ransom 
lliams, Althea Champaign Gifford 
lliams, Anna Ethel Jackson Elkville 

"illiams, Bertha P (Missouri) St. Louis 

"illiams, Dora Elizabeth St. Clair Marissa 

■ illiams, Esther DeWitt Weldon 

illiams, Lillian Logan Lincoln 

illiamson, Bertha Mae Sangamon Pleasant Plains 

illiamson. Hazel Audrey McLean Carlock 

illiamson, Helen Christena ...McLean Bloomington 

illy, Edith Anna Ford Roberts 

ilson, Anna E Sangamon Divernon 

ilson, Effie Mae Peoria Dunlap 

ilson, Gertrude Kankakee Bradley 

'ilson, Gertrude LaSalle Tonica 

ilson, Gertrude Maude Cumberland Neoga 

ilson, Gwendolyne Christian Edinburg 

'ilson, Hester Fulton Fairview 

'ilson, Laura F Iroquois Donovan 

ilson, Lillian Piatt Mansfield 

'inch, Marie Virginia Sangamon Springfield 

'inchell, Helen Lucile McLean Normal 

'inchester, Zella Peoria Elmore 

'inkelmann, Sophia C St. Clair Belleville 

'inkier, Cecel May Woodford Metamora 

'inks, Lottie Louise Iroquois Watseka 

'inslow, Katherine Livingston Fairbury 

'inter, Gladys Pike Pittsfield 

clever, Olive Catherine Stephenson Freeport 

oik, Leanora Aldene Woodford ElPaso 

'omack, Eva Elizabeth McLean Normal 

'omack, Grace Elvira Madison Madison 

^onderlin, Grace Mabel McLean Colfax 



192 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME COUNTY POSTOPPIS 

Woodruff, Edna Madaline ... .Hamilton McLeansbc 

Wooldndge, Mrs. Myrtle S. D. . .Logan Lath^ 

Woolston, Mary Alice Montgomery * .* * Nokon 

Woolums, Lydia Esther McLean Danvf 

Workman, Grace Nita Sangamon Springfif 

Worley, Alta, May ., Sangamon iniopo 

Wright, Jessie Mane Douglas Newrn 

Wright, Katie E Clinton .'.V V. cS 

Wright, Leota McLean '. stanfo 

Wright, Louise Gazelle Mercer Seat 

Wright, Maude Randolph **.*/. Spar 

Wright, Nelle E McLean McLe 

Wright, Wilma Wabash Mt. Carir 



Writer, Vienna M Iroquois . 

Wunsch, Bertha Livingston 

Yantis, Gwendoline Christian 



Cheban 
Saunem 
Moweaq 



Yarrington, Ruth Anna Bureau Princet 



Yates, Ethel Louise Vermilion 

Yazel, Emma McLean . 

Yerkes, Alta Shelby . . 

Yerkes, Lola Shelby . . 

Yewell, Estella Pope . . . 

Yoder, Bessie Joy McLean . 

Yoder, Ella Mae McLean . 

Yoder, Mary Ann McLean . 

Young, Callie Pulaski . 

Young, Elsie M Scott . . . 

Young, Emma McLean . 

Young, Frances Mabel McLean . 

Young, Ina Macoupin 

Young, Jessie Lora Macon . . 

Young, Nellie Marion . . 

Youngblood, Mabel C McLean . 

Zaugg, Rosalie Madison . 

Zeller, Elizabeth Morgan . . 

Zimmerman, Alyda Tazewell 

Zimmerman, Frances Jasper -. 



Hoopesti 
. . Ellswor 
, . Moweaqi 
. Moweaqi 
. . . Golcon* 
. . . . Carlot 
, . . Meado\ 

Norm 

Grand Gha 
. . . Glasgc 

Norm 

.... Norm 

Girai 

. . . Decat-. 

Sale 

Norm 

Altc 

. . Alexandi 

Pek 

Newtc 



Zimmerman, Mary Elizabeth . . . McLean Bloomingtc 

Zmn, Dorys E Livingston Flanagf 

Zmser Ethel M Peoria Chillicotl 

Zook, Ethel M, Fulton Farmingt( 

Zook, D. Mane McLean Norm 

Zulke, Emma Wilhelmine Menard Tallu 

Adams, Walter Scott Lake Antioc 

Adiington, George W Ford Melvi 

Albright, Raymond Bean Tazewell Minn 

Alexander, E. Eugene McLean Bloomingto 

Allan, William D McLean NorniJ 

Anderson, Harrison Munro McLean Normf 

Antle, Russell J Sangamon Springflel 

Atkinson, Harry Grant Champaign Broadlanc 

Auspurger, Edmund Milo Ford Gibso 

Aulabaugh, Charles Macoupin Hettic 

Ault, Ray Kankakee Momenc 

Austin, Isaac White Carir 

Bailey, George D Sangamon Cantra 

Bainum, Donald Ford Paxto 

Baird, John Shelby Gowde 

Baker, Samuel Henry. Jr Piatt Cerro Gord 

Banton, Huston J Macon Mt. Zio 

Banton, Oliver Macon Mt. Zio 



Illinois State Normal University 



193 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

irr John McLean Bloomington 

irrere, Willoughby E Christian Owaneco 

irtholomew, Homer Sangamon Berlm 

lyler, Clarence Elton Lake Zion City 

^an, George S Marshall Henry 

3chtold, Ray Harold Macoupin Girard 

^ckman, Frederick Ferdinand . McLean Bloommgton 

^echer, Leon Fredric Woodford Washburn 

msema, Clarence Iroquois Danforth 

^rns Lawrence W Kankakee Chebanse 

erbaum, William Charles P>lontgomery FarmersviUe 

rks, Jefferson S Macon Blue Mound 

vin Ray L Macoupin Palmyra 



air, Edgar T. 

ickewitz, Harry 

3ggy, Horace E 

Dlla, Ernest Gordon 

)ne, Harris Lee 

-»stic, Leo Ray 

3wyer, Lewis Herbert 

paden, Noah 

[•adfield, WiH 

randenburger, Friedolin R. A. 
raun, Edward Joseph 



Cass Chandlerville 

Christian Harvel 

St. Clair Lebanon 

Vermilion Danville 

Moultrie Bethany 

Sangamon Lowder 

Piatt DeLand 

McLean Normal 

Lawrence Pinkstaff 

, St. Clair Freeburg 

_ .Livingston Saunemin 

rfa^n,' Amer R. , . .\ McDonough Good Hope 

riscoe, Henry Guy Pike Pleasant HiU 

rougher, Dale Vermilion CheneyviUe 

rown, Clyde Randolph Sparta 

rown, George W Greene Roodhouse 

ullman, Stephen Earl Macoupin Bunker Hill 

uUock, Forrest Minor Woodford ElPaso 

urns, William Moultrie Sullivan 

utler, Charles Henry Moultrie gu ivan 

utler, Donald Malone Moultrie §u ivan 

utler, Edward T Moultrie Sullivan 

yerley, J. Ray Champaign St. Joseph 



ain, G. Earl 

alhoun, Harold Verne 



Sangamon Loami 

Marshall Wenona 



anan, Edward J., Jr Calhoun Batchtown 



arney, Leo Edward 
avins, Joe L. 
hangnon, Leo Eugene 



Ford Guthrie 

McLean Normal 

_ Kankakee St. Anne 

hapman, Walter W McLean Bloomington 

hilders, Eddie E LaSalle .Utica 

hism, Chester W Tazewell Armmgton 

hurchill, Allen B Pope Go conda 

hurchili, James L Pope Golconda 

lapper, Carl Adams Mendon 

lark, Ralph Sangamon Glen Arm 

lements, George Vermilion J>luijc\e 

oatney, Elmer C Macoupin Bunker Hill 



loddington, Sherman M. 

loliier, Arnold D 

lonnor, Charles Clifford 
lox, Carroll Downey . . . 
Irawford, John William 
Irigler, Thomas Burr . . . 

Iross, Carson 

)awson, Dewey M 

)e Barr, A. L 

)effenbaugh, Hobart C. . 
)eLand, Glenn A 



McLean Normal 

DeWitt Farmer City 

Kankakee Momence 

McLean Normal 

Marion Patoka 

McLean Normal 

Hamilton Dahlgren 

Edgar Scottland 

Christian Taylorville 

Champaign Mahomet 

Piatt White Heath 



194 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



1 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFPIfi 

DeLong, Luther Ray Calhoun Hambi' 

Dickerson, Guy Leon Macon Decat* 

Diesing, Arthur E Adams Quin- 

Dragoo, Alva William Douglas Murdo- 

Drennan, Raymond R Christian Edinbu* 

Ducey, Edwin Pike Pittsfit' 

Dulaney, Frank S Pike Pittsflt 

Durbin, Leslie Christian Palm 

Durham, Virgil Pike Rockpc 

Ebert, Charles William Ford Robei 

Echols, L. Byron Jefferson ML Vern 

Elliott, Prewitt Sangamon Berl 

Ensminger, J. Lloyd Adams Coatsbu 

Ernest, Robert B Perry Swanwi 

Eusey, Samuel McLean Norm 

Evans, Emerson Piatt White Hea 

Farley, John E Sangamon Springfle 

Farnam, Herbert Mason Mani 

Feek, John Lester Ford Ellic 

Fehrman, Edwin 1 azewell Pek 

Feller, Albert Marion Kinmum 

Folkers, Richard D Tazewell Deer Cre( 

Follmer, ClifTord H Livingston Saunem 

Frankenberger, A. L LaSalle Uti( 

French, Floyd Pike Miltc 

Fuller, Lucius King (Idaho) Acequ: 

Funk, Aaron Lynn Piatt White Heat 

Fuson, Cecil Mason Havar 

Gambon, William G McLoan Bloomingtc 

Ganzer, Frank A Marshall Hem 

Garlough, Molvin McLean Norm? 

Garrison, George B Pike Pea 

Garst, Cassius A Montgomery Raymor. 

Gasser, Alwin G St. Clair Waterlc 

Gerdes, Ewell Emerson ^'^ass Chandlervill 

Gerhardt. William Paul Rock Island Carbon Cli; 

Gibson. Ota E Ogle Mount MorrJ 

Gillis, Hallie H McLean Bloomingto 

Glossop, Janips Ernest Scott Wincheste 

Goodwin, Freeman C LaSalle Tonic 

Gorman. Victor W Vermilion Oakwoo 

Grable. John B Hamilton Brought© 

Graham. John W Putnam McNab. 

Gray. Orley E MrLean Bloomingto- 

Gray, Percv McLean Norma 

Grav, VernC McT>ean Bloom ingtoi 

Green, Gerald Rav McLean Bloomingtoi 

Greene, Chester " McLean Bloomingtoi 

Greer. Herman White Norris Cit) 

Greer. H. Frank Greene White Hal 

Griffith, Eric H Perry '^^^^^f 

Grimm. Lester R Montgomery Litclinelc 

Grodeon. Elmer A St. Clair Lebanoc 

Grogan, Carl Lawrence ^^?^^^5 

Grotts, Walter Franklin Macoupin Girard 

Grounds. Earl E Lawrence Lawrencevijie 

Grounds. Frank Oral Lawrence Lawrenceyille 

Grubb. Donald J Adams ^^^^2 

Hackard. Harry M Adams • • ,t5arry 

Hacker. Linder A. W Pope Su'^t o? 

Haigh, Raymond Kankakee ^ v ^«1 

Haines, Robert Emmett McLean Normal 



M 



m-, 



Illinois State Normal University 195 



J^ NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

k Inon, John Edward Christian Morrisonville 

i tnon Raymond Joseph Christian Morrisonville 

I -inson, Archie E McLean Normal 

—•'k '.rr Thomas Leonodus McLean Heyworth 

h Well, Wilburn R White Omaha 

k irsy, George W Monroe Burksville 

' lYiin Fred Clay Xenia 

k issett, Joseph Nicholas Pike Pittsfield 

•••••;i lyes, John L MpLean Bloommgton 

■" ^•' 4th Lester Livingston Oaell 

!■ 3drick, Leonard C Edwards West Salem 

r« mmer, William A St. Clair ^J^^^,^ 

•'^ 3mpen;FredJ Clinton . ^,^?^ll\l 

Brriott, Marion E (Michigan) St. John s 

3rrling, Charles C St. Clair Millstadt 

• i^:* aver Henry Macoupin Bunker Hill 

-••!* iJks;Blueford :::: Fayette Vandalia 

1 igginson, Glenn Wabash Keensburg 

• ildebrand, Harvey T St. Clair Millstadt 

^' ill, William Harry Livingston Flanagan 

inckle, Charles M Macoupin ^^l, 

- oagland, David Ford , ^"^^fjf 

ogan, James Edgar Christian Pana 

I olman, 0. Hayward Wayne • Cisne 

;;• olmes, Parker M McLean Normal 

%' olt. L R Shelby. ^^^.^,^,"'1^ 

olt, Orval C Iroquois Milford 

onnecker, Armin Lewis St. Clair Be ley i lie 

: ooper, Herman P Pike Pittsfield 

Jt ostettler, Tony Clovous Lawrence Lawrenceville 

:- oward, Gordon Kirk McLean Bloommgton 

k ubbard, Nicholas Leo Logan Mt. Pulaski 

. T: uber, Frank J Livingston Ponliac 

ufTman, Robert Benjamin CSouth Dakota) ... . Pierre 

uffmaster, Clifford William . . .Shelby Ste\vardson 

ughes, Cyrus Earl Hamilton Dah gren 

ughes, Guy R Hamilton Dahlgren 

ull, George Earnest Pike KmdoThook 

unt, Donald M Peoria Peoria 

utchinson, John H Lawrence bMimner 

utton, Emmett McLean Saybrook 

-eland, Guy Lawrence Bridgeport 

t^ ["ving, Bruce McLean ,.. ^'^1, 

- ves, Joy DeWitt ^Y/^^'l^ 

ves, Truo, C DeWitt ^"^ ^f®]^? 

ackson, Ervin Lawrence Vinc^nnes (Ind.) 

ackson, Euris Cass Chandlerville 

effrey, Arthur John McLean Normal 

ellison, Hoinro M Adams • . ,S,^^i"<^y 

enkins, W. il McLean Bollllower 

ensen, 01iv<^r McLean Heyworth 

W inkins, Harland D Vermilion Fairmount 

' W ohnson, Grover Everett Ford Gibson City 

■ ■ » ohnson, John Henry Peoria Mapleton 

tjnH' ohnson, Joseph Marshall McLean ,\'rV!^^^ 

K? ohnson, Roy H OeWitt Weldon 

^ if ohnson. Waldo Theo McLoan Bl^ooinington 

\ ones, John W Ford Gibson (.ity 

""h ones, Konneth McLean Norma 

'"m unk, Ccdric Thomas Mcf.can ^'T'" u 

"^ Cane, Clyde Ernest Saline Raleigh 

Casel, Alfred W St. Clair Lebanon 



ili 



196 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY P0ST0PPI8 

Keeler Otis . Fayette Brownstow 

Kelso, Raymond W McLean Bloomingto 

Kennedy, Earl V Massac EodoI 

Kennedy, Thomas Hart Woodford Minon 

Kerr, Carl Constantino McDonough * Adai 

Kerr, Grover W Wayne . f ;;;; Mt Er 

Kerrick, Carlton E McLean Bloomingto 

Kettermg, Raymond Mason McLean Norm^ 

King Loman Champaign Broadland 

Kmgdon, George Livingston CuUor 

Kirgan, Benn W Greene Eldre 

Klump Howard Rede Shelby Moweaqu 

Knecht, Herman Paul McLean Norms 

Knight, Luther . . Wabash 'keensbur 

Keehler, Freeman A Edwards West Salen 

Kramer, Arthur Elmer Logan Emde' 

Lancaster, Thomas Jesse Macoupin Staunto^ 

Langfeldt, Grover Henry Logan Mt Pula-^k 

Lay, Chester Frederick Pope New Burnsid 

Lee, Harold Fitzhugh (Texas) San Antoni. 

Lees Harry H. . Shelby Ocone^ 

Lembaugh, Howard Hancock Dallas Git^ 

Leitze, Charles L Scott Mancheste" 

LeMarr, Paul Earl Macoupin Palmyr; 

Lesseg, George E Calhoun Golden Eagl. 

Lester, Jesse D Pike Miltoi 

Liberty, Henry Louis Will Jolie 

Lightbody, Ernest Rieger Peoria *. .*.* Glasfort 

Lmdsey, Richard Vernon Logan Mt. Pulask 

Link, Fred W Macoupin Gillespi( 

Little, John .. LaSalle Streato: 

Litton, Thomas Tazewell Mortoi 

Livingson, Samuel Madison Edwardsvilk 

Long, Paul .... Montgomery Waggonei 

Loudon, William N Livingston Flanagar 

Lucas, Joseph Clinton Moultrie SuUivar 

Lynch, Jewel Franklin McLean Norma; 

McBride Ralph Warren Monmouth 

McCall Arthur B Sangamon Springfielc' 

McCarl, Clement Adams Plainville 

McCartney, Asa Cecil Pike Rockporf 

McCollom, Roy Milton Macoupin Hettick 

McCollum, Charles A Montgomery Fillmorp 

McCord, Orville Thomas McLean Normal 

McCoslin, Guy Wabash Mt. Carmel 

McGue, Thomas Edward Sangamon Williamsville 

McDonald, Jackson Howard Menard Greenview 

McDowell, James Raymond Tazewell Armington 

McKim, Chester Lincoln Moultrie Bethany 

McLaren, Homer D Fulton '..."Summum 

McMahon, Edward Lawrence . . . Marshall Lacon 

McManus, J. L Macoupin Palmyra 

McNutt, Zenas Virgil Adams Mendon 

McReynolds, A. Guy McLean Arrowsmith 

McWherter, George Watt McLean Normal 

Madison Henry A Iroquois Clifton 

Magill, Clark R. W Moultrie Sullivan 

Malcom, Jesse M Woodford ElPaso 

Marston, Oliver Talmage Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Mattix Forrest E Fayette St. James 

JJ^??' y^Jli^"^, Emera Edgar Redmon 

Medford, Charles Edward Macon Decatur 



Illinois State Normal University 



197 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

elton, Ralph Raymond i^^ ®^?,^?^ SRS 

ericle, Harold Francis Vermilion -/-^p^^!} 

erritt Joseph E Wayne , Fairfield 

ever Edgar R Macoupin Hornsby 

ever Harold Frederic McLean Lexington 

ever William W Macoupin Garlinville 

illpr RalDh W Moultrie Sullivan 

fken Vaughn David McLean Normal 

iman Lewis (England) London 

ills Trella Brewer Lawrence Chauncey 

ikt'pad Harlev P McLean Normal 

&r John J Vermilion Fithian 

iSfe'e wyerrbV;... Vermilion Danville 

onev 'Floyd Sangamon New Berlm 

ontffomery Arl Marshall Henry 

oStloSerP, ROSS Albert Logan Lincoln 

ontgomery, Walter Abner Lawrence a+^?fnrH 

oore Clifford Walter McLean Stanford 

core Joe McLean Bloommgton 

core; Wayne Stewart McLean ^rfi^^A 

orse, Finley Champaign G fford 

orse, James Todd Champaign ^Vo•.S^Uv 

ueller, Emil A Madison Granite City 

nmVk Harrv E Logan Lmcom 

Sskonf Richard St Clair East St. Louis 

e4lin John . ! ! 1 ! 1 ! Vermilion Georgetown 

pwton George '. Woodford Metamora 

fchol?' EMe Piatt Monticello 

orthcutt";^ James A Scott ^l?o'nedile 

utty, Carl A Tazewell ^%®l^iS 

'Rrfen Edwin Pike Barry 

S; James .Z. Woodford Roanoke 

'Brien, Philip Thomas Champaign Tolono 

rendorff, Allen Glenn McLean Bloomington 

Macoupin Carlmville 

Morgan Franklin 

McLean Normal 

....Logan Ji^'^5°^5 

....Peoria Glasford 

Henry Kewanee 

'.'.'.'. (Colorado) Denver 

Iroquois Ashkum 

Champaign Urbana 

....Douglas Garrett 

....White Carmi 

Kankakee Momence 

Tazewell Delavan 

Moultrie Sullivan 

. . .Lawrence St. FrancisviUe 

^viP9 Leslie Lawrence St. FrancisviUe 

^ryor, Jesse AlUA! '. Fayette Brownstown 

^url, Rutherford Keith Greene ^r W.^tTp^S 

)uick, Chester Allen Lawrence St. granc sv e 

luick William Eston Lawrence St. Franc syi lie 

labe, Fred Stanilas Mason Forest Uty 

lamien, Louis H Livingston liw 

lamsay, Dwight M ^'K'-' 4nll?van 

lay, Artrice Elva Moultrie 't^.^o Jio^Hc 

lay! Harry Champaign Broadlands 

leav'ley, Lester S '^^^^T^v!" ^rh^^l^^ 

Rebbe, Alfred Randolph i>''^JnlZ 

Reece, E. Oliver Fayette Brownstown 



(wens, Harry James 

:ley, Lawrence T 

kckard, Paul Collins., 
krk, Oscar Bradford., 
'artridge, Henry W... 
•artridge, Ray Sylvester 

>eak, Paul Read 

^ennington, Earl L 

^ettys, Wilber Orlando 
%illippi, Marshall King 
^hipps, George Carl... 

Sorter, Ellic S 

^orter, Henry V 

^owell, Orville Wendell 
^rice, John 



I 



19^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS . 

Reed, Ezra Podp -n^i^.r.^^ [ 

Reichiing, Frank ! . .' ! ! st'^ Clair ;;;;;;;;;;; * • iSfi St 

Reitz, George Henry Christian ..... Panal 

Rigg, Harry G. . Wabash Keensbure 

Riley, Michael Kelley Gallatin RTdgwaf 

Ring, Eh Franklin Richland N^fie' 

Ritz, David Oliver. McLean .:...;; Normal 

Robertson Thomas B Sangamon BeSin 

RobiSsoS' Jos'ef h'n f^'r"" Jasksonvil e 

Rollev El \iTw Jackson Murphysboro 

noiiey, Jiiias W Putnam Magnolia 

Roney Walter Moultrie Bethanv 

Royalty, Wayne V Pike . . ^iS 

Rudolph, Clithero iFord * 1S?I^ 

Rutherford, Edgar King Macoupin *. *. '. *. *. *. *. *. *. '. '. *. *. *. . RerHd 



r> ri i j' i^^^*^"- /^liig iviacoupm Rpnld m 

saler ' Lvi^ p''°^ -^ !l}T"p'" :::::. GiS; 

^ager J^yie J^ :•••-! McLean Hiid«nn 

Schaefer, William k Madison ^ Alton ^ 

Schmjtt, Louis F Marshall .... i! i.! l! i:. Henry ' 



|chofield, Roy Morgan .;::::::.•::::; Waverly 

Sebright,^ Guy Lawrence ...:::. Sumner 

Benson 
)anville 

Shelton, Ira„ Johnson : Hr»nf«hn^S 



Seifert, Victor Woodford Benson 

Shank, John W Vermilion r»o^ -n • 

Shannon, Elbert E. . . 1 ! ! ! 1 ! ! ! [ [Ma^nT. ::::: ^S fe ' 



Short, ChaHes V .' .* ioreene White Hall 

1 

)in 

ii?l^?' Seward p.* ;::;:::::;; : ; FayeTte. ; : ; : : : : : ; : .-^ . vandaiia 



Shotwejl, Ray J ! . . . .* [McLean Normal ' 

Virden 

. Cisco 

Bloomington 



ot: 11 T ' ^'-"•^^^ MCi^ean 

bhull, Jesse C Macoupin Virden m 

Simer, Stafford Lane Piatt ...;.... .* * CiscS ' 

Simons,^Gaylord McLean .* Rlnnr^inifnn ' 



ShibP Rav P Jonnson Grantsburg 

feniiDe, Ray C. ._, Scott Winchester 

White Hall 
. . . Normal 
. . . Virden 

Cisco 

Moomington 

S-nithi George a: .;;::;:::::;;: Macoupin ■.■.■;.•.■.•.•.•.•.■ • BrTghfon 

Smith John Aaron Madison Tro? 

Sowa, Louis C Taypwpll i^' /'"' ' 

Soarks, John Woodruf .:::::: Montgomery Ro^fmnnrt ' 

Stewart, Bradford McLean ! .* ! ' .' * * nS i 

Stewart, Harry Edward Stephenson Freep^?t i 

feS!^f hS-"'^'- : : :::::: .-^Sn ■::::::::::::-^ 

Su livan Wilham P Sangamon ... EliopoTis 

Sutton, Clarence McLean Stanford 

Swearingen, James McLean Heywo^th 

Tallyn, Chester Arthur Woodford ..... Binson 

Tappen, Russell Golding Will . . Tol w 

Tatman, Horton E. ...^ McLean ::::::::::::;• Norma 

Taybriyu^^c'"' ^"^^'"^ * * ^Mf^ ' ' ' ' ^a^sTall 

iplrRtSd'c.- ;::::: ; : : : : 'A'i^ltn ':::::::::: ''"i^ 

Thompson Lee E McLean . . . .. Saybrook 

Throgmorton, Josiah Norris ....Johnson ........New Burnside 



I 



Illinois State Normal University 199 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

ViKyev W F Macoupin Brighton 

rfZ Wilfiam G Madison Godfrey 

l^n^i Gll^nce E.' ! ! Sangamon ^PSTf k^n 

f=^?l^^^!^!.::::::::::^Sian-;:::^ 

Lhentke Herman L Iroquois ^^^^^^^^Caim 

Turner, James Festus 4i?.^^^^^?^N JinhT^ 

Jnderbrink, Henry Elton (Missouri) ni^vU e 

^ance, Clarence E Vermilion MoHpio 

J^flTipil Merle L Macoupin • . . Modesto 

^an'petten Franklin T McLean ^^°^?5^^elto 

v^erner Everett B Macon Decatur 

^illhard Arnold Henry^ St. Clair ^^"^""^'A"i^ 

^on Brethorst, Friedrich W Ford KiVmnndv 

:^ainscott, Austa G Marion ^'""SiYaS 

\Valden, Bernard Owen Macoupin rAninvrnP 

^Valton, Henry Harrison Macoupm ^^'^^'''pina 

^ard, Brewer Wellington Christian Pana 

Garfield, Thomas C Piatt ^® pu,inville 

Warner, G. A Adams ^^ T?7vnU 

Earner, Rufus Olin Peoria Trivol 

Washburn, Robert Glenn McLean Normal 

vVatson, George Edrie Sangamon H'^rm^nnd 

Weaver, Leo Wortham Piatt .Hammond 

S^pWh Michael G Knox Williamsfield 

S^est Glyd^^^^^^ Edwardsville 

^^heatley Everett Wabash Mt Garmel 

Wheeler, Bruce Elijah Macoupin lovhrnnV 

White, George McLean ^^^n??i^n 

White Orville Sangamon Buffalo 

S^hitmore, LeRoy McLean ?>l^Sw^li^[} 

Wiemers, Julius Edwards Macoupin Bunker Hill 

Wierman, Harry Wilson LaSalle h\;.Ju^u}l 

Wilber, Karl Allison Lawrence Russellvil e 

Wilcox. Claude Vernon 9\^^}S^. ^^ fr.^ 

\Vildy, Frank R St. Glair Dupo 

\Viley Frank Grant 5?^^J. • V ^^Tpph? 

Willey Ivan Lowell Woodford becor 

Williams, Harold K (Michigan) .... Sault Ste. Mane 

Williams, Roscoe J 51^^.^??^ ;/ ' v9Z^^^u}}l% 

Williams, William Christian Mechanicsburg 

Wilson, Alvy M Madison „9m?P^^® ^A^^ 

Wilson, Bernard E Sangamon Wi lamsvi e 

Wilson, Fred A Sangamon Williamsville 

Winchell, Paul Edwards Kane ., Batayia 

Wirth, Edward H St. Glair Waterloo 

Woods, Orlo Wayne Livingston Fairbury 

Worley, Louis Evans McLean Normal 

Worthington, Robert Menard ;,r??/®^^^^rg 

Wrench, Frank Piatt White Heath 

IWrench, Marion Piatt K « ,^ 

Wrench, Noble Piatt Mansfled 

Wurtsbaugh, LeRoy A Lawrence Lawrencevi le 

Yeck, Raymond D Woodford Roanoke 

Yocom, Chester Howard Iroquois CheDanse 

Young, Clyde M Champaign Ludlow 

Zimmerman, William Christian ^^^7^! 

Zingerlie, Fred Livingston Odell 



^^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

PUPILS OF THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

Graduates 



NAME COUNTY 



POSTOPFIS 



Calhoun, Mildred Peoria * Mkjf^ 



A^?A^r^^.^' Russell P>lcLean Norms 

) 

) 
) 
) 

) 

) 

) 

Shfrle 



Bohrer, Joe,... McLean Bloomingto 

Sumner, j\ 

Moni 

Norn 

• . Kempt 
Bloomingt 
Bloomingt 
- Mt. Aubu 
Bloomingt 



Gavins, Joe . . :. . ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 1 [^^Le^ ^^^^^^ 

Clayton, Vera Inez Ford 

Coolidge, Beatrice McLean 

Dodge, Monroe McLean 

Dunn, Frances Christie 

g^;ans, J Harwood McLean 

Elliott, Wmefrei , • -. McLean Bloomingtoi 



S;olidg^B^tri^ 

Du?n' Frances' J^h'^-T •• BlooZ-nftm 

Ljumi, !• ranees Christian Mt Anhnn 

SX^ns, J. Harwood McLean Rinnm i^^.V' 



Funk, Ruth, McLean Norma 

Norma 

Tv/r V,- ,, - lanagai 

. Marshall Varn; 



Gregory, Hel^en ........;.*.*.*;; .'McLean Norma 



Groskreutz Henry A .'Livingston* *.*/.*;.*;.*;; * 'Flanayal 

Justice, Willis Haynes Marshall . vl?n! 

lanagai 

Norma 



Kalkwarf, Alfred Livingston m^r^tJ^' 

Kline, Huth^...., McLean Bloomingto 



Kraft, Anna Lorraine McLean Norma 

Lawrence, Sidney Gordon McLean .... "" Hnrlcm 

Lawrence, Ray R McLean .* ! .* gudsoJ 

Livingston, Morton A McLean BlJomingto 

McKinney Inez McLean Hudsor 

Marvel, Marie McLean ..;':• Norma 

Millmken Vaughn David McLean ' NorSai 

Mohr, Lyle Bricker McLean No?Sai 

Moorf ^of ' ""'^^'"^ ""^^ i^^^^^^ *•* BioomingTor 

Ks. Tim McLean. Bloomingtor 

rT §' i /,; Champaign Gifford 

uuo, Ueaa McLean Normal 

Packard Russell Lowell McLean * Noma 

Powell, Cameron Lyle McLean Randnlnb 

Price, Walter Brokaw McLean ! \ '. '. \ ' Blooming or 

Putnam Luella Edgerton McLean . Normal 

Royce, Mercedes McLean Bloimington 

&/\vTe'r '' i'^^^^^ • • BlooSiSlton 

»ager, i^yie 1< McLean Hudson 

Sanford, Russell McLean '.i Normal 

Wessels, Walter Louis Iroquois Crescent Citv 

Wmdle, William Frederick McLean BloSmington 

Junior Class 

name county postoffis 

f Jdrich, Dorothy Jf^Lean Bloomington 

Ambrose, Bernard McLean Hudson 

Bachenheimer Hazel McLean Bloomington 

Baker, Samuel Piatt Cerro Gordo 

Bane, Ola May LaSalle Dana 

Barnes, Genevieve Lucille Livingston Fairburv 

Bayley, Herbert White Norris City 

Beckman, Arnold Orville McLean Bloomington 

Beckman. Harold McLean Bloomin|ton 

Beckman, Mama McLean Bloomington 



Illinois State Normal University 



201 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFPIS 

51air, Julius L McLean Normal 

3oyer, Wakefield McLean Bloomington 

—Brown, Bernice McLean Bloomington 

wfcown, Raymond McLean Normal 

Jtyant, Joe Gallatin Omaha 

J li nk. Arthur McLean Normal 

,f»|Eck, Howard McLean Normal 

■ Burtis, Parker McLean Hudson 

]ade, Helen Champaign Penfield 

?;ampbell, Genevieve McLean Normal 

:;apen, Henry Willis McLean Bloomington 

:]oen, Donald McLean Normal 

Coffey, George Douglas Oakland 

~' ' " ' Dallas City 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

, Bloomington 

Normal 

Herscher 

Shirley 

Shirley 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Ridgway 

, Normal 



dummings, Charles Hancock . 

Gurry, Hal McLean . . 

Custer, Frank McLean . . 

Darrah, Dorothy McLean . 

Davis, George Perrin McLean . 

Emmert, Ralph Joseph McLean . , 

Fanselow, Louie D Kankakee 

Funk, Elizabeth McLean . 

Funk, Eugene McLean . 

Funk, Mary G McLean . 

Goodwin, Wilma L McLean . 

Gray, Percy McLean . 

Green, Ivan Gallatin . 

Gregory, Ruth McLean . 

Haley, Mary Elizabeth McLean Bloomington 

Harpster, Earl Franklin Richland Olney 

Henry, Bertha May McLean Bloomington 

Hill, Mary Pierce Menard Fancy Prairie 

Hilts, Noel McLean Bloomington 

Hoffman, Alvin C Randolph Red Bud 

Hollis, Myra McLean Randolph 

Hopkins, Madelene Putnam Granville 

Husted, Stanley McLean Bloomington 

Johnson, Floy McLean Bloomington 

Johnston, Donald A McLean Hudson 

Jones, Exie D Mason Mason City 

Lawrence, Wilbur McLean Hudson 

Lees, Harry Howard Shelby Oconee 

Livingston, Sam McLean Bloomington 

Lucas, Clarence Woodford Secor 



Luther, Otto McLean 

McGormick, Robert S McLean . . 

Miller, Caroline McLean . . . 

Milliken, James Trent McLean . . 

Mohr, Earl McLean . . 

Montgomery, Lynn McLean . . 

Morse, Finley Champaign 

Odgen, Edith McLean . . 

Olsen, Hazel Leone McLean . . 



. . . . Normal 
. . . . Normal 
Bloomington 
. . . . Normal 

Normal 

Holder 

Gifford 

. . Lexington 
. . . . Normal 



O'Neil, William McLean Bloomington 

Orendorff, Hollis McLean Bloomington 

Orendorff, Maurine McLean Bloomington 



Orendorff, Zena McLean 

Packard, Paul McLean 

Palmer, Pauline McLean 

Peirce, Charles Bane McLean 

Pickering, Miriam E. McLean 



Randolph 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 
Normal 



Pierson, Ralph W. 



McLean Normal 



202 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



NAME COUNTY 

Porterfield, Alice L McLean 

Quinn, Forrest McLean 

Quinn, Irene McLean 

Ramseyer, Lloyd Louis McLean 

Rapp, Ruby Gladys Marshall 

Reilly, William F Iroquois GilmaT 

Rhmehart, Victor McLean Kerripl 

Shultz, Esther McLean .......:: sS 

Sparks Arthur Woodford Seco 

Stem, A, Edward Ford Sibley 



POSTOFFIS 

. . . Norma 
. . . Norma 
. . . Norma 
. . . Hudsoi 
Spee] 



Steinhilber, John Iroquois 



Crescent City 



Stiegelmeier Harvey L McLean Bloomingtor 

Sutherland, Mildred McLean .... — 

Sweeting, Lelia McLean 

Thomas, Lewis J McLean 

Turner, Irene McLean 

Victor, Sturgis McLean 

Weaver, Maurice J Ford 

Westhoff, Clarence McLean ...*.'.** 

Wiedman, Naomi McLean 

Wilber, Gertrude Helen McLean 

Willey Ivan Woodford 

Ziebold, Eugene Henry McLean 



Bloomington 
BloomingtoE 
Bloomingtor 

Normal 

Norma] 

Loda 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Secor 

Bloomington 



Sophomores 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Bohrer, Gertrude Ann McLean Bloomington 

Bryant, Mignon Sale McLean Normal 

Carter, Marion Josephine McLean Bloomington 



Coppenbarger, Lester D McLean 

Evans, John Watkin McLean . 

Evans, Miriam McLean . 

Foster, Judson McLean . 

Funk, Benjamin I McLean . , 

Garrett, Lolah M Sangamon 

Garvey, Helen McLean . 

Garvey, Richard McLean . 

Graves, Ruth McLean .. 

Hinton, Louise McLean . 

Holley, Loyd McLean . 

Hopwood, Beatrice Menard . . 

Humphries, Fred McLean . 

Jackson, Elgin Andrew Shelby .. 

Koener, Charles A Livingston 

Lay, Joel Dewey Pope 

Ludwick, Wilson S Livingston 

Meloy, Maurice Douglas 



Normal 
. Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

. Bloomington 

Riverton 

Normal 

Normal 

. Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Cantrall , 

Hudson ' 

Findlay 

. Chatsworth 
New Burnside 

Dwight 

Camargo 



Miller, Franklin Rush McLean Bloomington 

Montgomery, Marjorie FlorenceMcLean Bloomington 

Noggle, Carrol . . McLean Bloomington 

Oberkoetter. Frank McLean Bloomington 

Peirce, Earl Lincoln McLean Bloomington 

Powell, Pauline V McLean Randolph 

Rodman, Dorothy McLean Normal 

Ranger, Arthur Roy McLean Bloomington 

Reynolds, Edna Marguerite McLean Normal 

Rmehart, Donald McLean Shirley 

Riselmg, Cecil McLean Bloomington 

Robinson, Ruth L McLean Normal 

Ryburn, Madeline McLean Bloomington 



Illinois State Normal University 



203 



NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Jchlosser, Verlin McLean S^^^^^ 

Jchroeder, Fred McLean Normal 

;chroeder, Irma Marie McLean .^?^^^^] 

5mith, Louis L Macoupin Ni wood 

ruggle, Ethel Gladys DeWitt S^^^^^^ 

A^atson, Arthur N. McLean Normal 

iVeaver, Ruby Dell Ford - . Loda 

^elch. Dorothy Elizabeth McLean Bloommgton 

iVhitcomb, Morris Glenn McLean Bloommgton 

iVinkle. Leta Mae McLean Bloommgton 

Freshmen 



COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

McLean Normal 

McLean Hudson 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

Boiifware, Lyle McLean Bloomington 

Brokaw, Wasson McLean Bloommgton 

McLean Normal 



NAME 

\ckerman, Lizetta Sadie 
Ambrose, Lois Rachel . . . 

Andrews, Dorothy 

Barber, Lawrence Foster 
Bond, George Charles 



Brown, Harold Vernon 

Burr, Margaret 

Crisler, George 

Donahue, Anna May . . 
Dooley, Dorothy Ruth 
Dunn, Helen Louise . . 
Epple, Louise Roszinia 

Fehr, Marjorie 

Fleming, Joan 

Foster, Dean 

Frye, Clyde E 

Gregory, Ernest 

Grove, Nellie Estella . . 

Haering, Dorothy 

Hall, Maurine 

Harne, Dora Mabel 
Hood, Raymond Harold 

Howes, Daisy 

IngersoU, Vernice G. . 



Kerrick, Elizabeth 

Kerrick, Josephine 

Kinman, Theodore William 

Kirkpatrick, Helen 

Kraft, Marian 

iLasky, Wayne 

iLeach, Olwen 

Lloyd, Marie 

Lyon, Ruth 

McDowell, Pearl 

Marvel, Gertrude 

Maurer, Fern Lorine 

i Millikin, Alan 

O'Brien, Maurice Everett . 
' Oglevee, Helen Delores . . . 
iOsborn, Richard Arlington 

jPillsbury, Frances Hill 

i Porterfield, Marion 

, Putnam, Willis McDowell . 

I Rader, George Curtis 

Ratcliff, John Alexander . . 
Rawson, Tyrner Alice 



. . . McLean Bloomington 

...McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . McLean Leroy 

. . . McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . McLean Shirley 

. . . McLean Randolph 

. . . McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Carlock 

...McLean Bloomington 

...McLean Normal 

...McLean Danvers 

...McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . Tazewell Green Valley 

...McLean Normal 

...McLean Normal 

...McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Carlock 

. . . McLean Normal 

...McLean Normal 

. . . McLean McLean 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . McLean Bloomington 

. . . McLean Normal 

. . . McLean Normal 

...McLean Randolph 

...McLean Normal 

Tazewell Deer Creek 

... McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

McLean Bloomington 

McLean Normal 

Champaign Dewey 

McLean Normal 

McLean Normal 

. . . . McLean Bloomington 



^^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

NAME COUNTY POSTOFFIS 

Hzell McLean 

S!?.®,^^?' ,Ponald^. : McLean \'.'/.'.\'.\[[\: shirle 



Reece, Hartzell McT.pan at 

Rinehart, Donald .... McLetS S^'''?' 

Riseling, Manzie Lois ... McLean hV ' ^^'^}^ 

s.t?o%'' ^^? ^^^^^ .::::::::: McLetS ; : : : : : ; : : ; ^^°°To!de 

banford, Wilson MoT Pan aT ^^ 

Sohaefer, Dorman H. . Lewfs ^ n^vV w T " ^^.5^"^' 

i??r^^^®^' J^Pes McLean ^^Z^l 



Schroeder; Otto . .' ! ! ! .* ! ; ; ! * ' * 'SetS !S°™^ 

Schultz, Roy M McLean m°™^ 

Shope Mildred Emily ..;.;: i; iMcLeaS ^"™ 



Schffiz/ Frances r: . : .' ScLet^ Blooming o 

Smith, Jay G . mcL^I^ w ''' ®' 

Swearingen, Lena Mae ! .' .* ! * ' MclIIS Mn?'^° 

HfpfoT ^^^^^.i^e Emanuel . . . : : .McLeaS 1 ! ! ! ! 1 ! ! : Kma 

Utesch, Bernice Mary . MpT pan Wi' * ^\Orma 

wi^f • r°T^"^ .... ^. .::::::;: : McLtn : ; : ; ; : ; : : • ^'°°T± 

West, Carl Ernest McLean ijorma 

W ghtman, Austin Allen . . \ ffchlll ^S^ 

Wmdle, Mary Frances . . McT ean ' i,\" ?°¥^^ 

Winegerner, iela Fay .' .' ! .' .* ; [ [ [ Eon^ ; .' ; ! ] [ \ \ \ \ . ^.^?°S;?ltui 

CLASS OF 1916 

Graduates from Teachers College 

Ghitago.''"''' ^'^^ ^- ^^^^ ^^^ Chicago, Student University ol 

Eunice Rebecca Blackburn, Normal, 111., Teaching Geografy, L Sj 

^^'"^hans'lom^"''' ^^''^^^' ^'™^"^ Supervisor, Soldiers' Or^ 

wL^rI?i'''® Bojing DeLand, Assistant Principal in High School! 

School"'''''^ ' ' ^""^^^^ Teaching English in Public mgl^ 

FIH fc® kZ' w^^^""^?;' Teaching English in High School. 
r}%^?r S^^"^' Harrisburg, Assistant in Science 
Gertrude Mayo, Waukegan, Teaching Fifth Grade 
Alberta Senton, Streator. '^idue. 

Marietta Stevenson, Williamsville, Teaching English and Historv! 
Th^mn'.^?J^^T^^^'' P^Pton, Superintendent School? ^* 

School! ^^^^^ster, Donovan, Principal Township High* 

fnhS^\^'^^%'^'-?}}^K^.i^' Weldon, Teaching Science. i 

nfghTcho?! ' ^^''^' T^^^h^^^ ^h^sics and Chemistry in; 

^'"tuy of ChS ^^^* Kenwood Ave., Chicago, Student Univer-i 

Earl <>royer Stevens, Rankin, Superintendent. 

George White Bethany, Superintendent. 

Thomas Jefferson Wilson, Normal Critic Eighth Grade, and Princi- 
pal of the Elementary School, L S. N. U. 

TT T T . , Normal- School Graduates : 

Helen Irene Anderson, Joliet, Teaching Art. 

Geraldme Archambeault, Joliet, Teaching in Grades 

S^oof ^ Augspurger, Cerro Gordo, Assistant Principal of High 

Hazelle Electa Baird, Minier, Teaching in High School. 

LeTa^R^'ap Rm.w ^^®'*' Cadwell, Teaching Superior Country School. 
Lata Rae Billings Eusey, (Mrs. Samuel Eusey), Pekin. 
wfn!o qS^S^^^^?"^' Teaching High-School Science and Music. 
William Shirley Mae Bruce, Fairbury, Teaching First Grade. 
Helen Lucile Bush, Danvers, Teaching Intermediate Grade. 



Illinois State Normal University 205 

a Martha Changnon, Cleveland, Ohio, Teaching English in High 

ttaUe Chapman, 6049 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, Teaching Seventh 
(^T'ade 

:ssie Dale Clark, Normal, Student I. S. _N. U. 
ary Lucretia Colgrove, Mattoon, Teachmg Fifth Grade 
arie Cook, Mackinaw, Teachmg Third and and Fourth Grades. 

'lorence Irene Crosby, Naperville, Teaching Third Grade. 

da Alene Crosby Berger, (Mrs. W. H Berger), Lincoln. 

[athryn Cummings, St. Paul, Minnesota, Teaching Third Grade. 

essie Dean, Naperville, Teaching in the Grades. 

oina Elizabeth Duvall, Argenta, Teaching m the Grades. 

luth Felton, Pawnee, Teaching Second Grade. 

larguerite Elizabeth Fields, Momence, Teaching First Grade. 

?lora Fink, Jerseyville, Teaching Physical Training and Geografy. 

Carrie Uhland Fisher, Riverside, Teaching Sixth Grade. 

faleria Franc Foster, Bellflower, Teaching English. 

^J.^a'&S^^ Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh 

^2flene^^^^^^^ As^'sSnt Domestic Science Teacher 

Uici EliSLtf Gasaway, Gilman, Teaching English and History in 

iarrfef ElfabeTh'Gates, 4540 N. Lincoln St., Chicago, Student. 

\iSe Walton Gillespie, Rock Island, Teaching Fourth Grade. 

te Stella Chism Good'heart, McLean, Teachmg m High School. 

Lela Mae Gregg, Mattoon, Teaching Second Grade. 

Nora Inez Grefg, Litchfield, Teaching m the Grades. 

auth Irene Guttery, Lincoln, Teaching Third Grade. 

Elva Guy, Decatur, Teaching Primary Grades. , p^^Hp« 

£1 ^^tS^^f^: I'^l:^A'''JsTKen^on Ave., 

(da Vera ^Hiironymus, Murdock, Assistant Teacher in Township 

Gert?ude Hogan!' Pekin, Teaching in Washington School 
Nnvrna Archlr Hogue, Monmouth, Teaching Sixth Grade. 
MabTl Dee HoUis, Saybrook, Teaching Doniestic Science. 
:julia Vemnica Hudak, Joliet Teaching in the Grades. 

E,lh?r"S.. Johnson. EBi.. Aul.l.nl Pnneip.l Townrtip Hish 

aStasf 5^3 Kg -»•- --'• 

Lide Kershner, Fairbury, Teaching i'^^^.I^^.^^^S^^oq, 

Mabel Anne King, Mt. Carmel, Principal High School. 

Agnes Leever, Pekin, Teachmg Seventh Grade ^^^^^ 

Maylou Magdalene Ludwig, Freeport, Teaching bixiu a 

Mild?ed"F.'Lundeen, Abingdon, Teaching Mathematics in the High 
Mabe^Natoe Macy, Decatur, Teaching in Grades. 



^^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

f ^a^Td^G'e^^^a^rttig^*^! '^^"^-^ ^"^'-^ Literatur, 

^^§P^^^^^!^i!Sl %T.., second Gradesi 
fi'vf.^^i? Marshall Peotone, Teaching a Country l;ho?l ' 

Delia Sears Moore, Springfield, Teaching Primary Grade 

"uppeMef '' ^'""'^^ TeachingirithmeUc and History in 

?iTif^ M^ ^'^R^'W^-f ^^laski. Teaching in Seventh Grade. 
E etta Marie O'Neil, Depue, Teaching in Grades. 

Higlf School ^"^' ^^^^®s^^^' Teaching Normal Training in 
^^^ Schoof^^^^ ^^^' Cabery, Teaching History and English in High 
Gladys Elizabeth Parks, Lexington, Teaching Fourth Grade. 
Cecil^Do^o^hy^Parsons, Sparland, Assistant Principal in Township 

Mo^?of T?li^^^^ii^??^i''^'.^i- Pulaski, Teaching Rural School. 

Marian Esther Pettit, East Peoria, Teaching in the Grades 
Minnie Mae Pierce, El Paso, Teaching First Primary. 

Jean Ruth Place, Freeport, Teaching Country School. 

Katherine^ Winifred Potts, Villa Grove, Supervisor of Music and 
Drawing. 

Phyllis Raycraft, Pekin, Teaching Third Grade. 

Nellie Willamine Reitz, Washburn, Teaching Mathematics in Town- 
ship High School. 

Effie Elizabeth Reynolds, Stockland, Teaching Domestic Science. 

Mary Robbms, Bloomington. 

Helen Rebekah Roe, Granville, Teaching in Township High School. 

Gladys Schlabach, Chatsworth, Teaching First and Second Grades. 

Coama Marie Scott, Davenport, Iowa, Teaching in the Grades. 

Mary Ina Seed, Cicero, Departmental Work, Seventh and Eighth 
Grades. 

Hazel Pearl Seitz, Pekin, Teaching Fifth Grade. 

May Sherden, Montevallo, Alabama, Assistant Teacher of Fine Arts. 

Helen Van Meter Sherrard, Murdock, Teaching Mathematics in 
Township High School. 

Lucile Shipley, Maroa, Teaching Third Grade. 

Fannie Showers, Normal, Student I. S. N. U. 

Josephine Simkins, Pekin, Teaching Fourth Grade. 

Winifred Vera Smith, Mason City, Teaching Music and English. 

Marie Elizabeth Stoltze, Normal, Studying Music. 

Bessie Stone, Minooka, Teaching in the Grades. 

Irma Agnes Stracke, Clovis, New Mexico, Teaching Domestic Science 
and Music. 

Ada Clare Swaim, Mackinaw, Teaching Seventh and Eighth Grades. 

Niza Ethel Swickard, Newman, Teaching Country School. 

Verneil Elizabeth Swigart, Farmer City, Teaching Fifth and Seventh 
Grades. 

Nina Marie Tappe, West Chicago, Teaching Handwork. 

Maude Terrell, Pekin, Teaching First, Second, and Third Grades. 

Rhue Thomas, Pekin, Teaching in the Grades. 

Emma Trainor, DeLand, Teaching First and Second Grades. 

Mildred Twomey, Towanda, Teaching First, Second, and Third 
Grades. 

Agnes Marie Whalen, 6015 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, Student Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Esther Wiechert, Belleville, Teaching in the Grades. 

Leanora Aldene Wolk, Magnolia, Teaching First and Second Grades. 



Illinois State Normal University 207 

ary Alice Woolston, Crete, Teaching First, Second, and Third 

rfhS^Bolev Cerro Gordo, Superintendent of Schools. , 
riedolin &denb^^^^^ Decatur, Teaching General Science and 

HxvSfTofeoh Braun Murdock, Principal Township High School. 
St Minor Bullock Manhattkn, Superintendent of Schools 
S Burtis, Philadelphia, Pa., Student University of Pennsyl- 

harTe^Henry Butler, Palmyra, Teaching in High School, 
.hn Wesfey Carrington, Manteno, Superintendent of Schools. 

S^ar&«S^cr^^.. B.anc.es 
or f^oX^'hf^lolfXlX:^ Training. 

'r.Zf\^<]Uiim Hacker Durand, Superintendent of Schools. 

SSI ISA'SC SSS%V,'&SS'o, Tow..»,p H„» 

to..¥Str Sloraiv.nl. CW.l.nd, OMo. T-.Wng M.nu.l Tr.ln- 



208 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

TwELv Months Ending June 7, 1917 

Senior College Graduates ' 92 

Junior College Graduates 63 

Teachers College Undergraduates (Section K) 150 

Normal School Graduates ^ ^^ 

Undergraduates 

Section A aa 

p> 66 

P 78 

D ^6 

E 16 

p 23 

H 21 

/ 1^' 

^ 21 

L 54 

M 45 

N 63 

14 

P 70 

589 

Mid Spring Term 184 ^^ 

New for the year * ^^j 

Summer Term 1916, First Term ,. 2285 

Summer School 1916, Second Term .'.*.*.* .* 559 

T.-^ 2844 

Ditferent summer students 2577 

Total attending only in summer 2301 

Total different students in Normal School and Teachers 

College 339^ 

High-school students, Graduates 43 

Third year 94 

Second year 44 

First year 59 

250 

Elementary School pupils (12 months) 468 

Kindergarten pupils 90 

Total of resident students and pupils 4205 

Non-resident students in Extension Courses 677 

Grand total, resident and non-resident 4882 



Illinois State Normal University 



209 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT AND TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Attendance by Counties, June 12, 1916-June 7, 1917. 

dams 29 Johnson 4 Scott 17 

lexander 4 Kane 4 Shelby 23 

;ond 8 Kankakee 73 Stark 13 

rown 14 Kendall 1 St. Clair 88 

37 Knox 21 Stephenson 9 

.... 12 Lake 13 Tazewell 117 



ureau 
alhoun 
arroU 
ass . . 
hampaign 



5 LaSalle 50 Union 2 

21 Lawrence 41 Vermilion 70 

66 Lee 3 Wabash 16 



hristian 71 Livingston ... 122 Warren 9 

jark 5 Logan 66 Washington ... 3 

lay . ! ! ! 15 Macon 92 Wayne 5 

linton 10 Macoupin 90 White 

Qles 5 Madison 82 Whiteside 

Marion 30 Will 

Marshall 71 Williamson . . . 



9 

4 

60 

2 

4 Mason 51 Winnebago 1 

)eWitt 54 Massac 2 Woodford 87 



ook 

rawford . 
umberland 



12 
3 



Arkansas 



>ouglas 21 McDonough ... 4 

luPage 3 McLean 588 Colorado 1 

Idgar 17 Menard 32 Florida 1 

Idwards 6 Mercer 9 

Iffingham 4 Monroe 3 



Idaho . 
Indiana 



ette 28 Montgomery 



ay 
'ord . . . 
'ranklin 
'ulton . 
fallatin 



49 Iowa 



80 Morgan 



Kentucky 



8 Moultrie 40 Massachusetts. 

14 Ogle 



2 Peoria 75 



•eene 42 Perry 



Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 



rrundy 



37 



Piatt 61 North Dakota 

Pike 57 Ohio 



lamilton 13 

[ancock 21 Pope 13 South Dakota . 



lenderson 
[enry . . . 
L^oquois . 
ackson . 
asper . . 
efferson 



9 

32 

107 

3 



Pulaski 



Texas 



Putnam 25 Vermont 1 

Randolph 12 VN^isconsin 3 

Richland 13 Wyoming 1 

10 Rock Island .. 4 England 1 

8 Saline 5 India 1 

ersey 8 Sangamon 102 

Daviess 1 Schuyler 7 Total 3397 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Accredited High Schools 18 

128 



Accounting 

Admissions, Conditions of ..... .. ......'. 

Advan.st Standing ' 

Advertizing "* 

Agriculture .35' 

Agriculture, Courses in ........35, 48 

Agronomy ' ' J^j 

Aid to Students .........!.!.!!!. 19 

Algebra. Courses in 62 

Alumni Quarterly '. 15 

Anal>1 ical Geometry 65 



16 

19 

130 

121 

121 



Animal Husbandry 

Animal Iv volution 75 

Apparatus, Construction of ............' 68 

Appointment to Scholarships 16 

.Architectural Drawing II5 

Argumentation [\[\ IOq 

Arithmetic. Courses in !!.!.60 61 

Arithmetic in the Grades I39 

Art. Courses in .28, 107 

Astronomy .".*..* 64 

Athletic Associatioa ....!........!i!!i!!i 14 

Athletics **" 133 

AtlriHlance. 1915-16 '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 208 

Bacteriology ., 77 

i?;;'h •w„•^^;:;:;;;::;::^^^v.v;E•••!'• !?5 

Biological Science "' 71 

Biologj- Method ... ....'. 

Bird .*^tudv 

B-'"' ' Wooma 

^•' cation 

1' . . 

r. — ...,,:.. .... ■ 



■ <'l. 



Botany. Courses in 72 75 77 

Browning, Course in ' 'ox 

Bildings ,2 

Business Arithmetic i.'!.'.*!.*!!.' 130 

Cesar. Courses in , *" in> 

Calendar ...!.! 4 

Campus !!!!!!!!!!!! u 

Cement Construction I2J 

Certificates. Teachers* .* ^ 

Chemistr>-, Courses in !!!!!." 69 

Christian A<v<K>ciations ..'/, 14 

Choice of Studies 43 

Choral Club 'l!*.'.!'.is 106 

Cicero. Courses in !!. .102-103 

Civil Government .'* g^ 

Clissifications of Students ! ^1 

C1.1V ^f-r!r;:nR [[[[] ,08 

#• sz 

y ^ 65 

J. , •P^"--.- 109 

toniMHi.'.I AnthmetJC 130 

Commercial Geografy f^ 

Commercial Program ^6 

Composition ....... 94 

Conditions of Admission '. 17 

Conduct of Students ,,', ->4 

Construction Work in 

Con.servation S"* 

Cooking Courses llg 

Costume Design 113 

Counties Rcpre.-cnled V? 

Country- Life Club 15 

Countn,' Schools .'.".*.'.' "'41 125 

Courses of Study .'.,..' *'6-J7 

Course of Study, Training Schooi ....'..' ."" 139 

Credits at Stale University 20 

Credits lor work elsewhere " 17 

Credits required for graduation .....'.'.'.'. 20 

Critiques I3g 

Cr>T>togamic Botany '........... 77 

Curriculums " ' 26-47 

Daily Programs '.'.'. ." ". 49.5^ 

Dairy Husbandry- 1^5 



Debating 

Degrees 

Delinquents 

Design 

Dictionary Work 

Dietetics 

Domestic Art 

Do-'--''- ^--nre 
Dr, , i 

D: , . 

Dra.. ,.,K < ouises 

Dre-ismaking 

Kco!o(^ 



if 



.-•iis 

...|07 



,\ncieru and Mediev, 

Mi'^ton' of 



1 Teachers 
•ry , 



Latin-English 
Organic , 



onj 



■ x:<: ;.>rincous Speaking 
r.ztcauon Courses 

l-aculrv 

^a. ' • ■. 

Fai 

Fa 

Fa 

Far 

Fu: 
Gi 
(.a 
f.r: 



:ng 



ouraes in 



of 1916 

A Class 1917 



Coui 



-^—nt 

• s , 



School 



m . 
•ncrcc 



.34. 47.11 



Hon s 

Hor in 

Hou.'^^ i.. .^,1 ii^ 

Household Science ..!!.. 31 

Index. The 

Inductiv Geometry !..!!!.... 

Industrial Chemistr>' 

Indu-strial History 

Kindergarten Jg, 

Kindc-garten Primary 

Laboratories 

Laborator>- Assistants 

Latin. Courses in 24, 

Lecture Association 



i 



■ 



i 



Lary 



PAGE 

13, 135 
135 



T-ary Management '■•'•^ 

Lrary Exercizes required J^ 

Lrary Societies „q 

Lrature, Courses m ^'j' 

Lrature, History of .•••••• ^J^ 

L ns'to" Students J^ 

Lition ; lie 

iV;hine Drawing •• f^ 

I lual Training, ^^' \\i 

>hanical Drawing \\^ 

^al Working ^JJ 

l^isuration ^^^ 

Alinery ; on 

l^ton, Courses m V" 

iiern European History »^ 

lynicipal Government J^ 

Jseum 26 105 

isic, Courses in '^^^ ^^^ 

I.sical Organizations ■•••• i^^ 

rure Study '^ 73. 7/ 

rure Study Club ^ 

:-mal, Town of |^ 

(.torical Association •• A^ 

{:hestra ^^' ^r° 

(;anic Evolution .•.•••••, ,x 

(ranization of the School lo 

(hografy ' jq2 



(id 
] nting 



tern Making • "^^ 



131 
96 
61 

, 102 
97 

.65-68 



lagogy 

ysical Training ...... 

imanship, Course in 

centage 

ilology 

onics 

vsics, Courses in 

ysiografy ^3 

ysiology 76 

int Ecology ,. 

int Morfology ., 

mt Physiology qo 

Ufomi Speaking rl 

^^^^.:!r'!:f-:::::::::::::::9i."9i:-93. 99 



,etry, Study of 



litical Science 

isitions for Teachers 



20 
111 
137 



.ttery 

actis Teaching ^ .. 

eparatory Program ^^' ^ 

imar/ Reading „ 

inciples of Kducalion ^^ 

ogranis, Daily 5^ 

•ychology Qo 100 

iblic Speaking '^^' ^J^ 

lilroads .v, '••;• ?n 

jlation to State University ^'^ 

hetoric 



PAGE 

Rhetoricals 25 

Rules Governing Studies ^4 

Rural Schools 125 

Rural Education 126 

Salesmanship 1;^U 

Sanitary Chemistry oy 

Sanitation and Hygiene 78 

Scholarships 1° 

School Law 55 

School Administration ^^ 

School Gardens '8 

School Management ^5 

Science Club .: ^^ 

Science of Discourse ^^ 

Sewing, Course in -11^ 

Shakspere 90, 92 

Shonhand ^'zl 

Social Ethics =» 

Sociology ^\ 

Singing \^\ 

Soil Physics ^f^ 

Special Students ^' 

Special English H 

Spelling l\ 

Spring Term Program ^^ 

Story-Telling, Art of ^^ 

Students' Loan Fund j^ 

Student Organizations |^ 

Student Publications ^^ 

Students Enrold ^Ti 

Substitutions of Electivs f1 

Summary of Attendance o^io ?n 

Summer School ''' \l ^" 

Summer Term Programs ^y.,^*^ 

Tacitus 



103 



Taxonomic Biology '| 

Teachers ,, 

Teachers' Certificates ,. -j^ 

Teachers College 

Teaching Process, The 

Text Books 

Tcxtils, Courses in ... 

Three-year Curriculum 

Township Scholarships '" 

Training Department ';^^ 

Trigonometry VVu'^6-% 

Two-year Curriculums -^-^^'.n^ oc 



37-39 

54 

19 

117 

38 



Tuition Fees 



,19. 25 
129 



Tvpcwnting ■•■t:"'i 45 

University IIigh_ School •• 2^ 



University of Illinois 

Vidctte 

Vergil 

Vocal Music 

VVint« r Term Program 

Woodwork 

Word Analysis 

Wordsworth 9^ 

Writing 71.7. 

Zoology, Courses in 



IS 

102 
105 
52 
112 
9( 
9( 



INOIS STATE NORMAl 
RSITY NORMAL, ILL. 



The 
1IRMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERI RS If. NUMIllili M 



COM AlMNti IHt- 

SIXTIETH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 1918-19 



PUBLISHT IN .11 ■. -I. OCTom K. 
.1 AMiAUY & Al'RIl., HACH VhAR 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMA 
^ VERSITY NORMAL, ILL 



The 
FORMAL SCHOOL QUARTERLY 



SERIES 16 NUMBER 67 

APRIL, I9T8 

THE LIBRARY OF THE 
JUN ^ t) 1930 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

CONTAINING THE 

SIXTIETH ANNUAL CATALOG 
WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS for 1918-19 



PUBLISHT IN JULY, OCTOBER, 
JANUARY & APRIL. EACH YEAR 



This catalog includes only a brief 
description of the courses offerd in 
the various departments. The cata- 
log of 1917, containing a detaild 
account of the courses, wil be fur- 
nisht upon application. 

Whenever two spellings of a 
word ar authorized by the New In- 
ternational or the New Standard 
Dictionary, it is the practis of the 
State Normal University to use in 
its publications the shorter form. 



r 



I 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 
NORMAL SCHOOL BOARD 



FRANCIS W. SHEPARDSON, Springfield, 
Ex-Officio Member and President 
FRANCIS G. BLAIR, Springfield, 
Ex-Officio Member and Secretary 



JOHN C. ALLEN, Monmouth 

ROLAND BRIDGES, Carbondale 

CHARLES L. CAPEN, Bloomington 

HENRY A. NEAL, Charleston 

FRANK E. RICHEY, LaSalle 

ELMER T. WALKER, Macomb 

— ^J. STANLEY BROWN, Joliet 

LEROY A. GODDARD, Chicago 

WILLIAM B. OWEN, Chicago 



Under the provisions of the Civil Administrativ Code the 
five state normal schools of Illinois ar governd by a single 
board consisting of eleven members, viz., the Director of 
Registration and Education, who is ex-officio president of the 
Normal School Board, the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, who is ex-officio its secretary, and nine members ap- 
pointed by the Governor for terms of six years. 



CALENDAR FOR 1918-19 



The school year of forty-eight weeks is divided into three terms of 
twelv weeks each, and two summer terms of six weeks each. A mid-spring 
term of six weeks runs parallel to the last half of the spring term. 

Summer Session, 1918 

Monday, June lo— First Term begins. 
Monday, July 22— Second Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 28— Second Term ends. 

Fall Term, 1918 

Monday, September 2— Opening of Training School. 

Monday, September gn-Fall Term begins. Normal and High School 

Departments. 
Friday, No¥#mbei: 29— Fall Term ends. 

Winter Term, 1918-19 wrv1.£> 

Monday, December" ^—Winter Term begins. 

Friday, December 20— Annual Contest of the Literary Societies. 

Saturday, December 21— Recess of two weeks. 

Monday, January -6, igrp^Winter Term resumae. 

Tuesday, February 18— Founders' Day Celebration. 

Saturday, February 22— Annual Contest in Oratory. 

Friday, March )^— End of Winter Term. 

Vacation of nine days. 

Spring Term, 1919 

Monday, March i^-^Spring Term begins. 

Monday, April 28— Mid-Spring Term begins. 

Friday, May 23— Junior Class Play. 

Thursday, June 5— Annual Commencement Exercises. 

Summer Session, 1919 

Monday, June 9— First Summer Term begins. 
Monday, July 21— Second Summer Term begins. 
Wednesday, August 27— Second Summer Term ends. 
Monday, September 8— Beginning of Fall Term of year 1919-20. 



i 



FACULTY 



DAVID FELMLEY, A. B., University of Michigan; LL.D., UniversUy of Illinois, ' 

L. H. D , Blackburn University 

PRESIDENT. 

HENRY Mccormick, Ph. D., LL.D., IlUnols Wesleyan 

Vice-President Emeritus. 

ORSON LEROY MANCHESTER, A. M., Dartmouth College; LL.D., IlUnais Wesleyan 

Dean and Professor of Languages and Economics. 

J. ROSE COLBY, A. B , A. M., Ph. D., University of Michigan 

Professor of Literature. 



K-L 



MANFRED JAMES HOLMES, B. L., Cornell University 
J) Professor of Pedagogy and History of Education. 

FREDERICK DELOS BARBER, A. M., Swarthnwre College 
Professor of Physics. 

GEORGE HENRY HOWE, Ph. D., Illinois Wesleyan 
Professor of Mathematics. 

/ „ FRANK WILLIAM WESTHOFF, 

Professor of Music. 

DOUGLAS CLAY RIDGLEY, A. B., Indiana University 

Professor of Geografy. 

EDWIN ARTHUR TURNER, A. B., Indiana University; A M., Columbia University 

Director of the Training School. 

JOHN LOSSEN PRICER, A. M., University of lUinois 
Professor of Biological Science. 

ADNAH CLIFTON NEWELL, B. S., University of Michigan 

Director of Manual Training. 

WILLIAM ANDREW LAWRENCE BEYER, A.M., Ohio State University 

Professor of Political Science. 

HARVEY ANDREW PETERSON, Ph D., University of Chicago 
Professor of Psychology. 

HOWARD WILLIAM ADAMS, B. S., Iowa State College 
Professor of Chemistry. 

HARRY ALBERT McGILL, A. B., University of Chicago 
Professor of History. 

IRWIN ARTHUR MADDEN, B. S., University of Illinois 

RALPH EYMAN, B. S., University of Ilhnots 

Professor of Agriculture. 

HERMANN HENRY SCHROEDER, Ph. B., Cornell College 
Professor of Education. 

CHESTER MILTON SANFORD, A. B., Cornell University 
Professor of Public Speaking. 

CLARISSA ELIZABETH ELA, 
Teacher of Art. 

ELMER WARREN GAVINS, 
Teacher of Orthografy and Reading. 

ALICE JEAN PATTERSON, S B., UniversUy of Chicago 
Teacher of Nature Study. 



OLIVE LILLIAN BARTON, A. B.. University of Itlinoi, 
Assistant in Mathematics and Dean of Women. 

GRACE ARLINGTON OWEN. A. M.. Columt»c Universtiy 
Teacher of Reading. 

KITURAH PARSONS, 

Teacher of Household Science. 

EDITH IRENE ATKIN. A. B.. Uniurr^y of Michigan 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

HENRY HARRISON RUSSELL. 
Director of Physical Education for Men, 

GRACE THOMASMA. A. B.. Univrrsity of Mich^gan 
Teacher of Rhetoric. 

CLARA MAUD PENSTONE. Ph. B.. Inivfrsity of Chicago 
Teacher of Grammar. 

ANNETTA BELLE COOPER. B. Ed.. Illinois State Normal University 
A&sistant in Household Art. 

HERMAN G. MILBRADT. B. L., UnivcrrUy of Wisconsin 
Teacher of German. 

VERNE McDOUGLE. A. M . Universiiy of Wisconsin 
VERNE DENMAN. ^»cannn 

Aiftirtants in Manual Training. 

CORA IRENE DAVIS. Ph. B.. Univrrsity of Chicago 
Director of Household Art. 

MABEL '^-i^^^^r^^^.V.^^ o, «.„,„ 

Ai*jstant8 in Geogra/y. 

EDGAR PACKARD 
Director of Country School DepAitmenL 

HAROLD FRANCES JAMES. 
Director of Art. 

ARTHUR ROWLAND WILLIAMS. .K. B.. Kmyon CotUgt 

Director of Commercial Department 

AUSTIN ELGIN WILBER. A. B.. Univrrsity of Michigan 

Director of Extension Department. 

LVDIA CLARK. 
Director of Gymnastics for Women. 

ANNA BL.\KE. B. S.. University of Chicago 
Teacher of Ph>-siology. 

GERTRUDE BAKER. 
Assistaru in Physical Education. 

VERLE SELLS. B. L.. MiJwaukee-Downfr ColUge 
Teacher of Shorthand and Typewriting. 

ETHEL OLDAKER. 
Teacher of Penmanship. 

ELEANOR SHELDON. A. M.. Univrrsity of Minnesota 
Teacher of English and Assistant Dean of Women. 

GEORGE JEROME KITDERNA. A. M.. University of Chicago 
Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

RALPH H.\RL.\N LINKINS. Ph. D.. University of lUinois 
Teacher of Z<x>log>-. 

CHARLES H. HAILE. Ph. D.. Princeton Univers^ 

Professor of Latin. 

MARY BLUEBELL HILL, 

Teacher of Arts and Crafts. 



M 



f 



n 



LENA MAY CRUM, A. M., University of Chicago 
Assistant in Domestic Science. 

I ; MRS. RUTH CLAPP KELEHER, 

'' / '^ Assistant in Music. 

MRS. HATTIE LEWIS LAY, 
Ij /•/ MRS. ELSIE CATTERLIN ZINN, 

Assistants in Home Economics. 

3 V RALPH W PRINGLE, A. M., Harvard University 
Principal of the High School. 

ALMA MARY HAMILTON, A. B., Illinois Wesleyan; A. M., Columbia University 
^■"^ OLIVE NEVILLE BARTON, A. B., University of Chicago 

THOMAS MORSE BARGER, B. S., University of Illinois 
MAE KNIGHT STEELE, A. B., University of Illinois 
Teachers in the High School. 

fa% ^ THOMAS JEFFERSON WILSON, B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University 

Principal of the Training School. 

**'mti, H AGNES GROVES STORIE, B S., University of Chicago 

Training Teacher, Seventh Grade, 

LORA MARY DEXHEIMER, 
Training Teacher, Sixth Grade. 

MARY EVANGELINE ROBB, 

MARY ANN BELL, 

Training Teachers, Fifth Grade. 



- 



JESSIE MAY DILLON, 
Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. 

IDELLA RETTINA BERRY, B. S., University of Chicago 
Training Teacher, Third Grade. 

LURA MARY EYESTONE, B. S., Columbia University 
Training Teacher, Second Grade. 

NELLIE CATHERINE THOMPSON, 
Training. Teacher, First Grade. 

MARGARET E. LEE. 
Director of the Kindergarten. 

GEORGIA LATTA, A. B., Milwaukfc-Downcr College 
Assistant in the Kindergarten. 

HARVEY TRIMBLE WHITE. 
Principal of the School at the Soldiers Orphans Home. 

JANE ANN BLACKBURN. B. Ed.. Illinois Slate Normal University 
Primary Training Teacher, Soldiers Orplia^^s Home. 

MRS. LAURA McMANUS. 

MRS. FLOY B. SHKRMAN, 

CAROLINE LAKRICK. 

KI.I.KN L TOY, 

ANNA BKLLE HAKPFR. 

LOTTIE HKLLKR. 

Teachers in the Training School at the Soldiers Orphans Home. 

THOMAS BILLINGS. 

Gardener. 

ANGELINE VERNON MILNER, 

Librarian. 

HELEN DOROTHY GRAVES, A. B.. University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Librarian. 

BERTRAM FRENCH. 
EDNA KKI.I.EV. 
Library Assistants. 

FLORA rFNNFI.L DODGE. 

LOITIE LAVONNE HAYES, 

Stenografcrs. 






KATHERINE CARSTAIRS, 
Registration Clerk. 

JENNIE TURNER, 
Finajicial Clerk. 



EXTRA TEACHERS EMPLOYD FOR SUMMER SESSION. 
— 1918— 

GEORGE NEWTON CADE, A. M.. University of Chicago 

MRS ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM. Indiana Su^.N^mS'^Schoal 

CHESTER FREDERIC MILLER, A. M.. Columbia UMversUy 

Education. 

BRUrF ^HTTry^T^ ?H^^V,r- ^- ,^«'^^^«'^>' of Illinois 
BKUCh HITCH. B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University 
JOSEPH HENRY JONES, B S.. Earlham College 
Biology. 

GARFIELD ARTHUR BOWDEN. B. S.. University of Chicago 
Physical Science. 

HELEN MABEL STRONG, A. M., University of Chicago 
Geografy. 

T^.rxr .^ WILLIAM WRIGHT McCULLOCH. 

JOHN ARTHUR STRONG B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University 

WILLIAM HAWKES. A. B.. University of Illinois 

MARTHA HUNT, 

ISAAC NEWTON WARNER. B. S., University of Chicago 

ELSIE WETZEL. 

Mathematics. 

r^tr^I^r^^^^^ TRAMS. A. B , University of lUinois 

CHESTINE GOWDY. A. B., University of Minnesota 

MRS. ELIZABETH M. CUNNINGHAM. 

ROBERTA LEE DAVIS. 

English Grammar and Composition. 

GORDON WATKINS. A. M., University of Pennsylvania 
Economics and Sociology. 

CHARLES HENRY DORRIS. A. M.. University of Illinois 

FREDERICK A. MIDDLEBUSH, Ph. D . Knox Collie 

WHITELAW REID SPURRIER. A. M.. Columbia University 

Histor>- and Civics. 

ESSIE CHAMBERLAIN. Ph. B.. University of Chicago 
Literature. 

DWIGHT EVERETT WATKINS. A. M.. Knox CoUege 

NAANA LYNN FORBES, 

Reading. 

RUTH STURGEON. 

MARY MAUDE SMITH. 

LAURA VAN PAPPELENDAM. 

Art Instruction. 

RUTH VIRGINIA SIMPSON, 

GRACE HUFFINGTON, 

Household Science. 

MINERVA COOK HALL, 
Music 

GERTRUDE BENDER SCHILL, 
Physical Training. 

MARY EMILY SMITH, 
The Training School 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



lumni— Mr. Pricer, Miss Penstone, Miss Cooper, Miss Steele. 

Athletics— Mr. Russell, Mr. Holmes, Mr. McDougle. 

Auditing— Mr. Adams, Miss Atkin, Mr. Gavins. 

iildings— Mr. Newell, Mr. James, Miss Ela, Mr. Wilson. 

ulletins and Printing— Mr. Holmes, Mr. Williams, Miss Thomasma. 

lampus— Mr. Pricer, Miss Patterson, Mr. Wilson. 

ihristian Work— Miss Atkin, Mr. Adams, Miss Barton, Miss Dillon. 

iourse of Study— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Howe, Miss Colby. 

)isciplin— Mr. Manchester, Mr. Russell, Miss Barton, Miss Colby, Mr. 

Howe. 
Entertainments— Mr. Ridgley, Miss Atkin, Miss Stark, 
'acuity Club Programs— Miss Penstone. 
^acuity Receptions— Miss Thompson, Miss Parsons, Miss Baker, Mr. 

McDougle, Mrs. Keleher. 
General Exercises— Mr. Sanford, Miss Berry, Miss Owen, Mrs. Keleher. 
iraduating Exercises— Miss Ela, Mr. Adams, Mr. Newell, Miss Owen, 
.ecture Association— Mr. Peterson, Mr. Westhoff, Miss Owen. 
Jbrary— Mr. Schroeder, Mr. McGill, Miss Colby, Mr. Ridgley, Miss 

Penstone. 
vlusic— Mr. Westhoff, Mr. Newell, Mrs. Keleher. 

Dratorical Association— Mr. Sanford, Mr. Beyer, Mr. McGill, Mr. Haile. 
Parents' Meeting— Miss Dexheimer, Miss Robb, Miss Lee, Mr. Milbradt. 
Playground— Miss Clark, Mr. Wilson, Miss Latta. 
Publicity— Mr. Ridgley, Mr. Williams, Miss Sells. 
Reception of New Students— Mr. Westhoff, Miss Penstone, Miss Sheldon, 

Miss Hill. 
Records— Mr. Gavins, Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes. 

Recommendations— Mr. Turner, Mr. Holmes, Miss Eyestone, Mr. Packard. 
Spring Festival— Miss Clark, Miss Owen, Mr. Westhoff, 
Social Life— Miss Davis, Miss Parsons, Miss Ela, Mr. Linkins. 
Soldiers' Roster— Miss Penstone, Miss Owen, Mr. Ridgley, Miss Milner. 
Student Activities— Mr. Adams, Mr. Howe, Miss Baker. 
Student Loan Fund— Mr. Gavins, Mr. Barger, Mr. Williams. 
Students Programs— Mr. Manchester, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Howe, 

Mr. Beyer, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Schroeder. 
Student Publications— Miss Thomasma, Mr. Beyer, Miss Hamilton. 
Student Welfare— Women— Misses Barton, Sheldon, Robb, Clark, Blake. 

Men— Messrs. Sanford, Russell, Gavins. 
Teachers College-Mr. Pricer, Miss Colby, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Ridgley, Mr. 

Beyer, Mr. Schroeder. 
Training School— Mr. Turner, Miss Dexheimer, Mr. Howe, Miss Berry. 
Philadelphian Society— Miss Stark, Mr. Gavins, Mr. Westhoff. 
Wrightonian Society— Mr. McDougle, Mr. Kuderna, Mrs. Keleher. 
Ciceronian Society— Mr. McGill, Mr. Barger, Mr. Eyman. 
Girls' Debating Club— Miss Blake, Miss Atkin, Miss Crum. 
Country Life Club— Mr. Packard, Mr. Madden, Miss Patterson. 
The President is ex-officio a member of all committees. 



^A 



10 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

T^HE ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY, founded i 
1857, IS located at Normal, two miles north of Bloomington It is th 
oldest state normal school in the Mississippi Valley, and the ninth to b 
estabhsht m the United States. 

^ The grounds include fifty-six acres besides a school farm of ninety. 
SIX acres. ^ 

There ar five major bildings besides a dormitory for women, a moderr 
heatmg plant, a plant house, and farm bildings. 

Its equipment is modern and ample. In the departments of biology, 
geografy and agriculture, as wel as in its training department, its facilities 
ar not surpast m any institution of its class. 
Its library contains 34,000 volumes. 
Its faculty includes seventy-two teachers. 

Its student body during the year ending June 7, 1918, has included 706 
normal school and teachers college students during the regular terms 2070 
summer school students, 310 teachers in Extension classes, 240 students^in 
the high school, 511 in the elementary school, and 452 in the school at the 
Soldiers Orphans Home. 

The ordinary annual income is, $215,270. 
It provides eleven distinct curriculums for high-school graduates to 1 
meet the varying needs of students preparing to teach at different levels of J 
the public school system, as wel as for special teachers of art and desi-n 
music, home economics, manual training, agriculture, and commercial 
branches. There ar other curriculums for country-school teachers and 
students of limited preparation. 

LOCATION 
The town of Normal, as its name suggests, has grown up around the 
Normal University. It has attracted a body of residents who value edu- 
cational advantages, and give to the community high intellectual and moral 
standards. 

The situation is helthful, the site high and wel draind. The town is ., 
provided with excellent water, sewers, paved streets, gas, and electric # 
lights. Commodious homes and boarding houses for 800 students stand 
withm easy walking distance of the school. An electric railway with cars 
every ten minutes connects Normal with Bloomington, two miles to the 
south, 

KOW TO REACH NORMAL 
_ The Illinois Central and the Chicago & Alton are the only railroads 
m Normal. Whenever it is possible, students on other lines should buy 
their tickets and check their baggage thru to Normal. Students coming 
to Bloomington on the Big Four or the Lake Erie & Western ar advized 
to check their baggage to the Chicago & Alton Junction in Bloomington; 
they may then leave the train at this station and recheck their baggage to 
Normal at a cost of nme cents, the price of a ticket to Normal 
o A,,^ .u^ ^9"!^;^- ^o Bloomington on the limited trains of the Chicago 
niflrjw'rS Four, the Lake Erie & Western, or the Interurban lines 
ot the llhnois Traction System may reach Normal by street cars. These 
run from all railroad stations to the Court House square, whence a trans- 

^^hiTl .^u""^? *^^/x'^ ^^^'^^t' South Main or Fell Avenue cars, 
which run to the Normal University. 

n.r.J^% ^^^ i?^ delivering baggage from Normal station is twenty-five 
cents from Bloomington fifty to seventy-five cents. Baggage should bear 
a card with the owner's name and address. 



i 



Illinois State Normal University ii 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

TiTERARY SociETiES.-There ar seven literary societies connected with 
school-the Philadelphian, the Wrightonian, the Ciceronian, the Girls 

Matin? Club and three junior societies in the University High School. 

iese afford practis in oratory, debate, dramatics, and parliamentary usage. 

•le societies hav wel-furnisht rooms set aside for their use. 

Christian Organizations. -New students receiv a harty welcome to 

e Youn- Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations of the 

ormal School. These organizations are vigorous and activ, and endevor 
promote the social and spiritual welfare of the students. The latter 

aintains a paid secretary. . . • ^i. i 

Oratorical AssociATioN.-The purpose of this associationis the cul- 
,ation of oratory, extempore speaking, declamation, and debate. The 
inners of the annual contest in oratory and declamation receiv the Rich- 
d Edwards medals, establisht in honor of the second president of the 
stitution The successful contestant in oratory represents this mstitution 
the contest held in March of each year under the direction of the State 

eag of Normal Schools. , . , ^ui ^- . 

The Athletic Association has general control of students athletics 
t conjunction with the directory of the gymnasium. 

The Lecture Association provides a course of high-class lectures and 

mcerts at low cost. 

Musical ORGANizATioNS.-The University Choral Club meets twice 
ich week at 6:15. The club gives three concerts each year, singing selec- 
ons from standard operas, oratorios, and cantatas. 

Glee CLUBS.-Four ar organized, two for men, two for women. 

The Orchestra gives students who play upon an mstrument an op- 
ortunity for practis in concerted playing. ^ 

The Band numbering about twenty-f\ve members receivs daily in- 
truction upon band and orchestral instruments. 

The Dramatic Club (The Jesters) was founded in 1909. 

The Science Club holds bi-weekly meetings, at which papers ar red 
ealing with scientific questions. 

The Social Science Club at its bi-weekly meetings discusses the so- 
ial, economic, and political problems of the day. 

The Nature Study Club discusses ways and means of extending and 
lopularizing the nature-study movement. 

The Country Life Club devotes its weekly meetings to the considera- 
ion of topics relating to the improvement of country life thru the leader- 
hip or co-operation of the country school. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
The Vidette is an 8-page weekly, fild with local news, alumni notes 
md practical and interesting matter on school topics contributed by faculty 
md students. It is under the management of the Vidette Board, elected 
)y the students of the various classes. _ 

The Index, publisht annually by the senior class, contams detaild in- 
formation in regard to the various student organizations. 

The Alumni Quarterly is a 32-page magazme mtended to keep 
alumni in touch with the life of the institution. 



U) 



'2 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

ORGANIZATION 

The niinois State Normal University comprises four schools-! 

The Normal School, 

The Teachers College, 

The Elementary Training School, 

The University High School. 
The Normal School is intended to prepare teachers for graded eleir, 
tary schools, rura schools, and village schools. It provides for high sThW 
graduates curr.culums two years in length for primary teachers for u» 
grade teachers and for special teachers of art, manual train ng housl' 
scence household art, agriculture, commercial branches, publk schoolr 
S.C, and the kmdergarten. One-year and two-year curri ulums ar prol j 
to prepare country-school teachers, and a preparatory program for ™ 
students who w.sh to make up deficiencies in high-school work ' 

The Teachers College is intended to prepare high-school teach, 
supervisors, prmcpals. and supermtendents whose dutfes require at ' 
extended preparation than the normal-school course I, nr/ 
four-year curriculums beyond the high-schooUeadin^.o the'proftssio 
degree. Bachelor of Education. Proiessio.l 

The Elementary Training School consists of a kindergarten and tk- 
grades. . ,s mtended to serv as a model school for observation and . a 
mg for students of the Normal School and Teachers College. The sch< 
for trainS" °^'"^"' "''"'= '^"'' ^^° """''^ '"^-'^^ '-'"er fact 

The University High School is provided primarily for holders 
townsh,p scholarsh.ps who ar too young to enter the Normal Schoo 
who do no. m.end to prepare for teaching. Additional students ar 'a 
mtted on payment of tu.t.on. It is a school of observation and training 
|22j^"dents m the Teachers College. The attendance is limited to 230. 

ENROLMENT 

,h. '^r^M ^' .P"'"'°"',<l^<^'d' '° ^"'er the Normal University as student 

ho^lH r Tf 1° t' "''''"'"' '"' =>" ^<""'"'°" blank Upon A 
should be en.erd the h.gh-school record of the student and such olh, 

fo th^N' 'T7'- ^'" ''"''''''"'" '°' ='^'"'"-" should .hen be mai' 
n 1 vT ^"'^•"^■'>'- Students who hav secured advanst standi, 
n other h,gher mst.tut.ons may settle by correspondence the classificatic 

that may be granted them. ""n.ain. 

students, and to the e.xam.nafon of students for advanst standing Ne> 

ZtZr'in:: «' T"'"' u '"^ -"^^^^ '° P--- '"- creden^tiair 
comrlittee V" "l' '^'" '""' '"^- '° ^°"^"" -i'h the appropria. 

commmee m regard to the.r program of studies, to enrol with the directo 
of the gymnasium, to consult with teachers in regard to their studies t, 
Zt^::l \T '"^'''r' '° ^'' "^^'^ assignments. In all .e™s 'tu 

offis of1he"presM"em"'""' " ''"'"'' " '''"'' '° ''"^^ ^'^"^ '» '"' 



^ 




Illinois State Normal University 13 

ONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO THE NORMAL SCHOOL 
Students ar admitted to the Normal School upon presentation of the 
f, owing evidences of scholarship : 

1. A high-school diploma. 

2. A teacher's certificate. 

3. A certificate of attendance at another state normal school. 

4. A township scholarship under the Lindly Act. This act provides 
f an annual examination in each township adapted to graduates of the 
etith grade. Successful candidates ar awarded scholarships good for 
f ir years at any state normal school in Illinois. 

5. A county diploma or certificate of graduation from the eighth 

gde. 

6. A statement from proper school authorities showing that one or 
r re years of high-school work has been completed. 

All students who hav done any high-school work should bring a copy 
( their record signed by the principal. 

Persons not provided with the foregoing credentials may arrange for 
aiission by correspondence with the president. 

To enter the normal school students must be at least sixteen years of 
It. Students not of the required age ar assignd to the elementary school 
( high-school until they reach the maturity desired. 

To obtain free tuition, students who ar not holders of township schol- 
jihips ar required to sign a declaration of their intention to devote them- 
jvs to teaching in the public schools of Illinois for as long a period as 
1?y attend the Normal School. 

Students may enter at any time, provided they ar competent to take 
1 the work then in progress. It is best to enter at the beginning of a 
rm. In all but the special programs classes ar provided each term for 
iidents beginning a course of study. 

CREDIT FOR WORK IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 
For all work done in other state normal schools and in the University 
Illinois, credit is given so far as such work is equivalent to our own 
urses. Credit for work done in other higher institutions is granted upon 
equate proof that such work is a satisfactory substitute for courses 
ferd here. No student is expected to mark time by repeating work well 
me elsewhere. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Teachers of maturity and experience may be admitted as special stu- 
nts, and ar permitted to take up any work for which they ar prepared, 
ley may not however, be permitted to teach in the training school until 
ey hav had preliminary courses in general pedagogy. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ADVANST STANDING 
To students pursuing any of the programs outlined on pages 22-41 
I opportunity is given to pass by examination any study in the program 
ithout taking the same in class. Arrangements for a suitable date may 
; made with the instructor. 



H Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

t.t ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS 

fadaatcs of high schools with four-year courses recognized byh 
State Department of Education ar admitted to the Teachers College o 
to any of the two-year programs (A to J) in the Normal School provec 
that the fifteen units of entrance credit that they offer include the foU 
ing: 

Algebra 

Geometry \ ""! 

Physics . : ""! 

♦Chemistry V:" V nnJ 

Zoology . ^ ""^.^, 

Botany '^^ ""?J 

Civil Government __:_:: ^^Jj 

History (General, Ancient, Medieval" English or Amer- ^ 

lean) _ _ _ Ti/ 

Literature and English CompoJi'tionTrrrrr. I ""rrmrrr 3 unit: 
Total .10 unitj 

The remaining five units may be composed of any subjects that le 
high school accepts to meet its graduating requirement. 

The work above stated is the minimum in each branch. It is expend 
that each student shall hav done more work in some of the subjects. 

Graduates of recognized high schools who hav not completed all e 
work listed above may take two of the omitted half-units in the regir 
classes in these subjects (see Program P, p. 40) as substitutes for two std 
subjects in their regular program. If the student is deficient in more th 
two half-units of the list, he shall add these subjects to the requireraes 
of his regular program. 

Graduates of non-recognized high schools with full four-year courj 
ar admitted on the same terms, and may continue in the program chos , 
provided that they maintain in their various studies a general average ■" 
not less than seventy-five per cent. If they fall below this average in a- 
term, they shall in the next term take such additional courses as may be :• 
ranged with the Dean. 

If high-school graduates admitted to the Normal University ar not a- 
to write well with ease and speed, or read distinctly with good expressi- 
or use the dictionary intelligently, or pass the examination in spelling, c 
tra courses in reading, penmanship, spelling and dictionary work must 
taken by them during their first year. 

of fo^v"^lVt^^\^r^''''''l^?^ ^'""'^ done in a preparatory subject in 180 recitation peric 
iorty minutes each, or the equivalent in laboratory- or other practis 

qTnH^'fc'T if "°* required for admission to any of the special curriculums C- 
elect ^&Sl Sen^^TnThdrtc^d ye^ar^.^^""' ^^°"^ '^'' ^"^^^^ ^^^^^"^^^ '' '' 



m 



Illinois State Normal University I5 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free to all qualified students of the required age who ar 
'^paring to teach in the schools of Illinois. A registration fee of two 
liars per term is charged all students except those holding township 
lolarships under the provision of the Lindly act. For each summer term 
, six weeks the fee is one dollar. Students from other states than Illinois 
;d students not preparing to teach ar charged an additional tuition fee of 
1 dollars per term for the long terms. If within five years such student 
om another state teaches an equivalent time in Illinois, the tuition is 
funded. An incidental fee of $1.25 per term is charged to maintain cer- 
in student organizations. 

Good furnisht rooms, large enuf for two persons, rent at from $2.50 to 
.50 per week. Table board in private families may be had at $4.00 to 
'00 per week. An excellent cafeteria and three restaurants assist in 
)arding students. Good rooms and excellent boarding places ar abundant, 
rrangements can be made better after arriving in Normal than by letter. 

Students not living at home ar required to room at approved houses, 
list of approved rooming houses is kept at the offis of the Dean of 
^omen. A written contract is required strictly defining the terms on 
hich rooms ar rented. 

Fell Hall affords rooms for 83 young women and boarding accommo- 
itions for twice that number. Students desiring rooms or board should 
idress the Hed of Fell Hall for a floor plan and a statement of terms 
oveming the renting of rooms. 

Text Books and ordinary stationery may be bought at the school 
Dok store at net wholesale cost ; or books may be rented at twenty per 
int of their ordinary retail price. Students ar advised to own and keep 
le text-books in advanst courses. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

To assist worthy students in completing their course of study the 
.lumni and Faculty hav created a Students' Loan Fund, from which stu- 
ents in their senior year may borrow at a low rate of interest a sum not 
) excede one hundred fifty dollars. 

Provision is made upon the Normal University farm for housing and 
oarding a small group of students of agriculture. These wil be afforded 
egular employment a few hours each day at fair wages. Application may 
e made by mail. 

Many students secure employment which enables them to meet their 
xpenses. For such employment address Miss Lillian Barton, Dean of 
Vomen. Students should consult her before entering into any agreement 
nth an employer. 

TEACHERS* BUREAU 

Thoroly traind teachers ar in demand in all the best schools of Illinois, 
^any boards of education will employ no others. There is a rapidly 
ticreasing demand upon the normal schools for such teachers. To meet 
his demand more effectivly the Illinois State Normal University maintains 
< teachers' bureau, whose purposes ar to secure for its students, free ot 
est, suitable positions, and to aid school officers in selecting efficient 
eachers. Students, as a rule, do not expect employment without a per- 
onal visit; it is hoped that the expense of such visit may be avoided 
inless there is some prospect of employment. 



l6 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

GRADUATION 

Candidates for graduation shall, at the beginning of the year in S(. 
tember, file with the Dean the program of studies they desire to foll.r 
during the senior year. This program must accord with the general da^ 
programs for the various terms and the rules stated on pages 20-21. " 
the student desires to make substitutions not provided for by the genel 
rules his request must be approved by the proper committee of the facul 

No person may receive the diploma of this institution unless he h, 
completed a full year (12 credits) of resident work. All candidates f' 
graduation shall write an acceptable thesis upon some educational then 
The subject shall be reported to the hed of the proper department at t 
opening of the Fall term. The thesis shall be completed and handed 
twelv weeks before the graduation. 

Students who lack no more than four credits of completing the cour 
of study may participate in the Commencement functions in June and rece 
their diplomas upon the completion of their work in the ensuing summ 
terms. 

Candidates for graduation should see that all conditions and de 
ciencies ar removed by the end of the eighth week of the Spring term. 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

The Normal School provides two summer terms of six weeks each fc 
activ teachers and for students who wish to continue their studies durir 
the summer. The programs consist chiefly of the regular courses in th 
various subjects. The daily program is so arranged that the student recitt 
twice per day in the same subject, thus completing a regular twelv-wee 
course in six weeks. All grades of the training school ar in session, af 
fordmg model lessons for observation and discussion and opportunity fc 
practis teaching. Especial prominence is given to music, drawing, con 
struction work, modeling, manual training, and the household arts, to th 
natural sciences, to the common branches as outlined in the Illinois Stat 
Course of Study, and to the special courses required in the examinatio 
for state teachers' certificates. Credit is given for all satisfactory wor 
and recorded on the books of the institution. A special summer-schoc 
announcement is issued in March. 

The large attendance of the summer school (2577 in the summer 
1916) makes it possible to provide concerts, lectures, and other forms 0: 
instruction and entertainment scarcely possible at institutions of limitec 
attendance or less fortunately adapted to summer study. 

A similar mid-spring term wil begin April 28, 1919. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

^ For the professional instruction of teachers in servis the State Normal 
University conducted in 1917-18 extension classes at Belleville, Blooming- 
ton, Colfax, Danville, Decatur, Fairbury, Granite City, Joliet, Kankakee, 
La Salle, Lincoln, Minonk, Nokomis, Springfield, and Wood River. 

The subjects studied wer Principles of Education, Education Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, The English Novel, and Art. Nineteen classes wer con- 
ducted with a total enrolment of 346. The extension courses coverd thirty 
weeks (September 10— April 27). Each class was visited by the instructor 



M 



Illinois State Normal University 17 

tteen times for a two-hour session. Teachers wer required to devote four 
I urs a week to home study and to purchase the regular text book used in 
1» course. Other books for reading and reference hav been supplied 
1 the local libraries and by the state. Students pay an enrolment fee of 

-ee dollars and receiv a major credit for the year's work. 
Similar classes wil be conducted in 1918-19, provided twenty teachers 

ite in requesting the same course. Correspondence should be begun 
,rly in order that classes may be organized as early as September 9, 1918. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The Normal School requires for most of its courses the degree of 
iturity and scholarship attaind by graduates of our best high schools 
th four-year courses of study. Accordingly the standard two-year 
rriculums of the Normal University ar pland for students of such prep- 
ation. Besides the standard courses others ar regularly taught to meet 
e needs of students of limited high-school preparation. In the standard 
'0-year curriculums, twenty-six credits of proper rank ar required for 
aduation. By a credit is nient the amount of work done in a term of 
'elv weeks in a subject requiring daily preparation by a typical student 
rrying four studies and reciting five times a week in each. To complete 
e standard two-year curriculums the attendance required of the typical 
iident is six regular terms of twelv weeks and one summer term of six 
eeks. 

RANK OF CREDITS 

Credits ar of four ranks according to the character of the courses for 
hich they ar given. The 305 courses offerd ar divided into four classes 
ith a small remaining unclassified group. 

The unclassified courses ar elementary courses in music, physical 
aining, phonics, writing, spelling and composition, which may be counted 
full value in any curriculum in which they ar required. 

They ar designated by the first nine numerals. 

Courses of Class i ar of Junior high-school rank and may be taken 
r any student admitted to the normal school. They ar of full value only 
curriculums M, N, and P, as described below. 

They ar designated by the numerals 11— 19. 

Courses of Class 2 ar of Senior high-school rank and may be taken 
/ students who hav had two-years high-school work, or by students with 
le year of such work provided they hav shown proficiency m the subject, 
hey ar counted at full credit value in curriculums L, M, O, and P, and at 
vo-thirds of a credit if substituted for courses in Class 3. 

They ar designated by the numerals 21—29. 

Courses of Class 3 ar of Junior College rank and may be taken by 
igh-school graduates and other students of demonstrated equivalent prep- 
-ation, or by students of three-years high-school preparation who hav 
lown special proficiency in the subject. These courses count at full 
•edit value in all curriculums except the Senior College, and at two-thirds 
•edit when substituted for courses in Class 4. 

They ar designated by the numerals 31 — 39. 

Courses of Class 4 ar of Senior College rank and may be taken by 
udents in the Senior College or by second-year students in curriculums 
— K, or third-year students in curriculums L and O who hav shown 
)ecial proficiency in the subject. They ar allowd full credit in all curric- 
lums. 

They ar designated by the numerals 41—49- 



.M 



iS Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

CURRICULUMS 

The regular curriculums of study ar : 

A. A two-year curriculum (26 credits) to prepare teachers of upr- 
grades. 

B. A two-year curriculum for teachers of lower grades. 

C. A two-year kindergarten-primary curriculum for teachers of t' 
kindergarten and of the first two primary grades. 

D to J. Two-year curriculums to prepare special teachers of Mus 
Manual Training, Art and Design, Household Art, Domestic Scien.. 
Agriculture, and Commercial branches. There ar also three-year curric' 
lums combining Music and Art, Domestic Science and Domestic Art. 

A four-year curriculum in Home Economics to meet the requiremer 
of the Smith-Hughes Act. 

K. A four-year Teachers College curriculum to prepare high-scho 
teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents. 

r^.c.. ^Q^^""^*^!!,"^ four-year high schools who hav the specific preparation, set forth 
wkhoi? cJndSion' ''''^'"'' °^ '^^^^ preparation ar admitted to the foregoing curriculum 

.nhr^^^^'^^'v ^*^^^^^^ ^^°f preparation falls below the equivalent of four years of hig 
schoo work and who wish to enter upon any of the foregoing curriculums mavarfan 
with the president or dean to take from the preparatory pFogrIm, (progr^ P^on p 4 
such courses as ar needed to complete the entrance requirements All such studei 

t^e r.i^fl.°f.r^'H-f ^'f°\^' "'^^'f^ ^^'^ ^^^^^^ "^^^^ °f ^^trance credits, in addSn 
tne regular credits of the curriculum selected. 

L. A three-year curriculum for students who hav had the equivalei 
of three years of high-school work. This leads to the same normal-scho 
diploma as programs A to J. 

M. A one-year curriculum for students who hav completed the tent 
grade and wish to engage in teaching country schools after a year's stud 

N. A similar two-year curriculum for graduates of the eighth grac 
who ar not less than sixteen years of age. 

Students who complete M or N ar recommended for third-grade teachere' ceitii 
cates under the new certificating law. icaciicis i.enu 

O. A three-year curriculum to follow M for students who expect t 
secure the regular normal-school diploma. Students who hav complete 
N may continue with curriculum O, but must take, before graduating 
enuf additional work from program P to make a total of fifteen units c 
entrance credit and twenty-six term-credits of normal-school work. 

ri,rr,V^S.'^^fV^.^°-5^''^''°"?§^^^^'^ ^ ""^ ^' ^^ ^'^^ *« ^^^^^ the diploma from any of tl 
t^Ki f T ' P ^' ^^"""^^ arrange with the President or Dean for the additional wor 
to be taken from program P. 

P. A preparatory program, three years or less in length, to enabl 
mature students to supply the deficiences in their high-school preparation 

Holders of first-grade teachers' certificates originally granted befon 
July I, 1914, with partial high-school preparation, may enter curriculum L 
They may, however, be required to take additional courses in English 
history or other branches according to the deficiency of their high-schoo 
preparation. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certificates who hav taught twc 
years may enter upon program L on the same terms. 

Other holders of second-grade certificates and holders of third-grad( 
certificates who hav taught one year may be admitted to section M or 
section P. 

Students ar designated by the curriculum they ar pursuing as belong- 
ing to Section C, Section D, etc. The year in the curriculum in which 
most of their work lies is designated by an exponent as A\ A\ etc. 



Illinois State Normal University I9 

TEACHERS* CERTIFICATES 

It is the duty of the State Normal University to prepare every kind 
,f teacher required for the public schools of Illinois. 

The needs of the schools ar set forth in the new law of 1913, govern- 
ne Teachers' Certificates. These certificates may be issued to candidates 
i,ho hav past the examinations prescribed by the State Examining Board, 
,r to those who hav done a required amount of work in "recognized" nor- 
aal schools or other higher institutions. 

The State Normal University provides the specific courses required 
or the various kinds of certificates. 

Graduates from curriculums A to L and from curriculum O ar entitled 
-eceiv a first-grade county elementary certificate good for three years 
aid renewable indefinitly. This certificate is good for teaching in a four- 
rear high-school if endorst by the county superintendent. 

Students who hav completed the work of the junior year m any of 
;hese curriculums may receiv the second-grade county elementary certifi- 
•ate at the option of the county superintendent of schools. 

Students completing M or N may receiv a third-grade county elemen- 
ary certificate under the same condition. 

The six-week courses required for renewal of these certificates ar 
Dfferd in the mid-spring term and the summer terms. 

The Kindergarten Primary certificate, good for two years and renew- 
able indefinitly, may be obtaind by completing curriculum C. 

Special certificates, good for two years and renewable indefinitly, may 
be obtaind after completing curriculums D to J in Music, Art, Manual 
Training, Domestic Science, Domestic Art, Agriculture and Commercial 

branches. 

County high-school ceritficates, good for three years and renewable 
indefinitly, may be obtaind after completing three or more years of the 
Teachers College progam, providing courses be chosen in accordance with 
the requirements of the Examining Board. 

County Supervisors' certificates may be obtaind only by examination 
in English, educational pyschology, the history of education, and school 
administration. The Normal University offers extended and thoro courses 
in these subjects. 

State Elementary certificates and State High-School certificates ar 
issued to teachers of due preparation and long experience in teaching who 
pass an examination in English, educational psychology, and principles and 
methods of teaching. The State Normal University offers adequate 
courses in these subjects in both the regular and summer terms. 

For the State Supervisors' certificate is required graduation from a 
normal school and an examination in English, educational psychology, 
sociology, the history of education, and school management, administra- 
tion, and supervizion. 



Hft 



20 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

RULES RELATING TO STUDIES AND 
CONDUCT 

1. Every new student is expected at the beginning to choose one c 
the various curnculums and to follow this curriculum as closely as is pra. 
ticable except where electiv substitutes ar specifically allowd. 

2. Variations from the regular program chosen ar permitted to sp< 
cial students, and to others if there be special need of such change A 
mdividual programs involving substitutions must be approved by the Pre« 
ident or the Dean. 

3. Students who hav become irregular in their programs or wh 
contemplate taking electivs should study carefully the daily programs o 
pages 46-50. All irregular programs should be approved by one of th 
faculty committee on student programs (page 9). 

4. No substitution may be allowd for the common branches unles 
the student gives satisfactory evidence of proficiency in such branches. I, 
doutful cases an examination may be required. 

5. No substitution for any of the natural sciences may be allowd un 
less the student's previous study in the omitted branch is equal to the re 
quirements for admission as shown on page 14. 

6 Electivs may be chosen from any of the programs on pp. 22-4] 
provided the student is qualified to pursue the subject with profit Thi- 
permission may be granted by the President or Dean. 

7. The electivs allowd include five years' work in Latin, three years 
work m French or Spanish, and courses in method for students who ha^ 
alredy attamd considerable proficiency in these languages. For the first 
years work m these languages one credit is allowd, for the second year 
two credits for all work beyond the second year and for the courses in 
method full credit. 

8. No electiv credit is allowd for a single term in cooking or sewing- 
tor two terms one credit is given ; for three terms three credits 

9. No credit is allowd for less than one hundred twenty hours of 
bench work. 

10. All classes recite daily in the regular terms. In the mid-spring 
and summer terms of six weeks two recitations per day ar held in most 
subjects, thus enabling the student to complete the regular twelv-week 
courses. 

11. Four hours per week of gymnasium practis is required of all 
first-year students. Students who cannot profitably take this work because 
of age or physical disability may substitute electivs. Ten library lessons 
ar given each term to entering students. 



Illinois State Normal University 21 



m 

ill 12. Thirty minutes per day ar devoted at General Exercizes to the 
onsideration of topics of interest to prospectiv teachers. All members of 
he school ar expected to attend. One day per week the school at this hour 
s divided into small sections for practis in platform speaking. All stu- 
lents not teaching at this hour ar required to participate in this work. 

13. Every student is expected to take not more than four major sub- 
ects (or their equivalent), nor less than three, not counting physical train- 
ng. Students whose standing in all subjects is above 80 may take a hevier 
)rogram, with the approval of the Dean. Students who work for their 
)oard ar not permitted to take a full schedule, 

14. If a student fails to keep pace with his class in any study he may 
)e trans ferd to a lower section in such study or be required to drop the 

itudy. 

15. If a student fails to carry a study after continuing thru half the 
erm he is required to repeat the study at the earliest opportunity. 

16. If a student fails to complete a course in which his work is of good 
luality, he should complete such course in the next term in which he is in 
ittendance and the course offerd. Otherwise the entire course is to be re- 
)eated at the earliest opportunity. 

17. A student who fails in an> term to make a passing grade in two 
najor studies, or their equivalent, is placed upon probation for the succed- 
ng term, and in case he fails to carry two majors in the succeding term, 
le shall not be permitted to continue his studies until one year has elapst. 
This rule may be suspended in the case of any student by a majority vote 
3f the faculty. 

18. Other students may be placed on probation by the faculty or by 
he Committee on Disciplin. Such probation shall not excede one term. 
Students on probation may not take part in any public contest or exhibition, 
ithletic, musical, dramatic, or oratorical. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Trem fees and tuition ar to be paid the first day of the term. If the 
jtudent leaves school within two weeks (one week in summer), fees ar re- 
funded. If a student paying tuition leaves school during the first half of 
the term, half of the tuition is refunded. 

Students ar enrold in their classes upon presentation of their term-fee 
or tuition receipt, or evidence that they hold township scholarships. 

Grades for scholarships indicate as follow: Above 90, distinguisht 
proficiency; 86-90, excellent; 81-85, good; 76-80, average; 70-75, fair work 
Delow the average; below 70 indicates poor work and the student must re- 
peat the course. The median is 80. 

Students ar expected, whenever it is possible, to enter school at the be- 
ginning of the term and remain to the close, to attend their classes reg- 
ularly, and to conform to the various requirements that hav been found 
necessary to the orderly and successful working of the institution and to 
the welfare of its students. 



m 



22 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



Fall 
Teaching Process 
Arithmetic 32 
Grammar 31 
Drawing i 
Physical Training 



CURRICULUM A 

For Teachers of Upper Grades 
78 Weeks— 26 Credits 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Physiology 31 
Geografy 34, 35, 36, 37 
Reading 31 
Phonics 

*Music 2 or 31 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

General Method 
Any electiv study 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring 
Psychology 33 
Nature Study 31 
Geografy 31 
Reading Method 
*Bookbinding or 
♦Bench ,Work 
Physical Training 



School Management 
Science of Discourse 
♦Political Science or 
Color and Design 
Teaching 



Economics 31 
History 31 
*Physical Science 
Teaching 



Principles of Educatio 
Literature Method 
♦Biology 33, or 
♦Color Practis 
Teaching 

Dictionary work, spelling, and writing ar required the second term 
all students found deficient in these branches. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 20 may be taken inst 
of the stard courses. 

Two teaching credits may be made in the same term at the Soldie 
Orphans Home. 



Illinois State Normal University 



23 



Fall 
Teaching Process 
Reading 31 
^honics 
^'hysiology 31 
Vfusic 2 or 31 
Physical Training 



CURRICULUM B 

For Teachers of Lower Grades 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 



Winter 

Psychology 33 
Arithmetic 31 
(Reading Method 32 
(Geografy 31 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Story-telling 
Intermediate Language 
♦Science of Discourse 



Spring 
General Method 
Nature Study 31 
Primary Geografy 
Primary Music 
Physical Training 



Literature Method 
♦^History Method 33 
Primary Handwork 
Color 
Teaching 



SECOND YEAR 
Principles of Education School Management, 



^Grammar 31, or 
♦Physical Science, or 
*Art Appreciation 
Teaching 



or Kindergarten 
Economics 31, or 

Sociology 
♦Playground Manage- 
ment 
Teaching 



Spelling and writing ar required of all students found deficient in 
these branches. These must be taken the second term. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 20 may be taken insted 
of the stard courses. 

Dictionary work and special drill in phonics and reading ar required of 
all students deficient in these subjects. 

Two teaching credits may be made in the same term at the Soldiers 
Orphans Home. 



24 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM C 

Kindergarten-Primary Program 

For Teachers of the Kindergarten and the 

First Two Grades of the Elementary School 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

JUNIOR YEAR 

■Yjr. , ^^^ Winter Spring 



tion 
Nature Study 31 
Primary Drawing 
Physical Training 



Educ. Psychology 40 
Kindergarten Theory 
Kindergarten Practis 
Literature Method 



Kmdergarten Practis 
Physiology 31 
Music 2 or 31 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

General Method 
Arithmetic Method 

SENIOR YEAR 

Sociology 41 
Kindergarten Theory 
Reading Method ^2 
Geografy 31 
Teaching 



Psychology ^3 

Primary Music 

Color 

Physical Training 



Principles of Educati( 
♦Primary Geografy 
♦Blackboard Drawing 
♦Playground Manage- 
ment 
T... . Teaching 

This program is pland for high-school graduates and to meet the 
quirements of the new law for the certificating of teachers 

of tlfe^d ctu^s.^^^^^'^"^ ^^ ^'^ ^"^^^ ^^ '^'^ - -^ ^^ -^- inst ^ 
^^^ Students taking this curriculum should be able to sing and play simpf 

.end':ornsTcutT^^^^^^^^ " '''"' '"'' ''''''' ""^^^^ '^'^ ™ ^^ ^ 

-.these^rrancLr'Tref"^ Tk ''/'^'" '^ ^" ^^"^^"^^ ^-"^ ^^^--^ - 
.tnese branches These must be taken the second or third terms 

OrpharHomr "^'"^ "^^ '' "^^'^ ^" ^'^ ^^"^^ ^-- ^^ ^^^ Soldiers 



Illinois State Normal University 



25 



CURRICULUM D 

Special Curriculum in Music 







78 Weeks— 26 Credits 






JUNIOR YEAR 






Fall 


Winter 


Spring 




Music 2 
Physiology 31 
Reading 21 
^Literature 32 
Physical Training 


Music 32 
Teaching Process 
♦Science of Discourse 
Reading Method 33 
Sound 42 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 


Music 31 
Psychology 33 
Sociology 43 
♦Public Speaking 
Physical Training 






Reading 31 
General Method 








SENIOR YEAR 





Music 33 Music 34 Music 35 

^Literature 35 *Principles of Education *School Management 

*The Speaking Voice *Economics 31 ♦Literature 41 

leaching Teaching Teaching 

Students who ar taking approved courses in instrumental music par- 
allel to this program may arrange with the Dean to substitute the same 
for the stard courses above. 

Other electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 20. 

Students found deficient in spelling or writing must take extra work in 
these branches during the second or third terms. 



26 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM E 

Special Manual Training Curriculum 
78 Weeks— 27^ Credits 



Fall 
Bench Work 
Drawing i 
Design 

Science of Discourse 
Economics 31 
Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Bench Work 
Mechanical Drawing 
Teaching Process 
Geometry 32 or 31 
Gymnastics 

Summer Term 

Pottery 
Bookbinding 
General Method 



Spring 
Lathe Work 
Mechanical Drawing 
Psychology 33 
Elementary Wood- 
work and Carpentry 
Physical Training 



SECOND YEAR 



Organization of 

Manual Training 
Teaching 

Machine Drawing 
Art Metal 



*Industrial History 
Architectural Drawing 
Teaching 
♦Furniture Designing 

and Construction 
♦Principles of Educatic 



Factory Method Fur- 
niture Construction 

Teaching 

School Management 

Primary Handwork 

♦History of Manual 
Training (1/2 Credit) 

Furniture Designing and Construction may be taken as a major c 
minor. 

Electivs chosen according to the rules on page 20 may be substitute 
for the stard courses. 

Students pursuing this curriculum who ar found to be deficient in pen 
manship, spelling, English composition, or oral expression ar required t 
take special courses in these subjects during the winter term or sprinj 
term. 



Illinois State Normal University 



27 



CURRICULUM F 

Special Curriculum in Art and Design 

78 Weeks— 26 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall 

i^erspectiv 
3oIor Theory 
^rim. Handwork 
:>rin. of Design 
(Physiology 31 
Physical Training 



Winter 

Light and Shade 33 
Art Appreciation 
Teaching Process 
Mechanical Drawing 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Nature Study 31 
General Method 



Spring 
Color Practis 
*Thin Wood 33 
Psychology 33 
Blackboard Drawing 
Commercial Design 
Physical Training 



SECOND YEAR 



^rt Metal 
llpostume Design 

'rin. of Education 
Jreaching 



Pottery 

Cast Drawing 

Home Decoration 

Teaching 



Bookbinding 
♦Economics 31 
Art Organization 
Painting 
Teaching 

Students pursuing this curriculum who ar found to be deficient in pen- 
uxianship, spelling, English composition, or oral expression ar required to 
jtake special courses in these subjects during the winter term or spring 
term. 



28 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM D-F 

Special Curriculum in Music and Art 



Fall 
Music 2 
Perspectiv 
Color Theory 
Prin. of Design 
Physical Training i 
Teacher and School 



ii6 Weeks— 38 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Music 31 
Light and Shade 
Art Appreciation 
Physiology 31 
Primary Handwork 
Physical Training 2 

Summer Term 

Nature Study 31 
General Method 



Spring 
Music 32 
Color Practis 
Thin Wood 3s 
Psychology 33 
Blackboard Drawing 
Commercial Design 
Physical Training 3 



Art Metal 
Music 3s 
Reading 21 
Teaching 



Costume Design 
*Literature 32 
*The Speaking Voice 
Economics 31 



SECOND YEAR 

Music 34 

Cast Drawing 

Pottery 

♦Science of Discourse 

THIRD YEAR 

Horne Decoration 
Sociology, or 
♦Reading 31 
♦Sound 42 
♦Reading Method 
Teaching 



Music 35 

Bookbinding 

Painting 

Prin. of Education 

♦Department Assistar 



Mechanical Drawing 
♦Literature 41 
Art Organization M 
Teaching ^ 



Illinois State Normal University 



29 



CURRICULUM G 

Special Curriculum in Household Art 

78 Weeks — 26 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall 
fusehold Art 31 
liching Process 
Sence of Discourse 
Inciples of Design 
Ctiinastics i 



Drawii 



Desijii 



Fall 
liningl msehold Art 43 
in. of Education 
istume Design 
aching 



ation 
Assiili 



DraviQj 



itioo 



Winter 
Household Art 32 
Psychology 33 
Commercial Geografy 
Drawing i 
Gymnastics 2 

Summer Term 

Physiology 33 
*Electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Winter 

Household Art 41 
School Management 
Home Decoration 
Teaching 



Spring 
Household Art 33 
General Method 
Economics 31 
or Sociology 
Color 
Gymnastics 3 



Spring 
Household Art 42 
*History of Education 
Industrial History 
Teaching 



CURRICULUM H 

Special Curriculum in Household Science 



Fall 
•usehold Science 31 
emistry 31 
'aching Process 
I'ommercial Geografy 
ysical Training 



msehold Science 41 

emistry 41 

tany 32 

Inciples of Educa- 

ion, or Teaching 



78 Weeks — 27^ Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Household Science 32 
Chemistry 32 
Psychology 33 
Science of Discourse 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

Economics 31 
♦School Management 

SECOND YEAR 

Household Science 42 
Chemistry 42 
Physiology 41 
Teaching 



Spring 
Household Science 33 
Chemistry 33 
General Method 
Sociology 43 
Physical Training 



Household Science 43 
♦History of Education 
♦Sanitation 42 
Teaching 



30 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



Fall 
Household Art 31 
Principles of Design 
Science of Discourse 
Teaching Process 
Gymnastics i 



CURRICULUM G-H, MINOR 

Three- Year Curriculum in Home Economics 

Household Art and Household Science 

116 Weeks— 38 Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter Spring 



Household Art 32 Household Art 3^ 

Drawing i Color 

Commercial Geografy Sociology 43 

Psychology 33 General Method 

Gymnastics 2 Gymnastics 3 

Summer Term 

Chemistry 31 
Home Decoration 
Electiv 



Household Science 31 
Household Art 43 
Costume Design 
Teaching 



SECOND YEAR 

Household Science 32 
Household Art 41 
Chemistry 32 
School Management 

THIRD YEAR 



Household Science 3. 
Household Art 42 
*Economics 31 or 

Teaching 
Chemistry 33 



Household Science 41 
Chemistry 41 
Botany 32 
Teaching 



Household Science 43 
History of Education 
*Sanitation 42 
Teaching 



Household Science 42 
Chemistry 42 
Physiology 41 
Economics 31 
or Teaching 

Substitutes for the stard courses may be made with the approval 
the president or dean. 

A diploma in Home Economics wil be granted to any high-schc 
graduate having the specific preparation required on page 14 who sh; 
complete twenty-six major courses chosen from the above list providii 
they include nine in practical work, two in practis teaching, four in educ 
tion, besides gymnastics, physiology, science of discourse, and two cours 
in science. 



Illinois State Normal University 



31 



CURRICULUM G-H, MAJOR 

Four- Year Curriculum in Home Economics 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall 

ousehold Art 31 
rinciples of Design 
hemistry 31 
hysical Training 
cience of Discourse 



ostume Design 
hemistry 41 
domestic Science 31 
otany 32 



Winter 
Household Art 32 
Drawing i 
Chemistry 32 
Physical Training 
Teaching Process 

SECOND YEAR 

Millinery 41 
Chemistry 42 
Domestic Science 32 
Physiology 31 



Spring 
Household Art 33 
Color 

Chemistry 33 
Physical Training 
Sociology 



Advanst Dressmaking 42 
History 32 
Domestic Science 33 
Psychology 33 



tomestic Art 43 
Iconomics 31 
eneral Method 34 
hysics 31 



THIRD YEAR 

Commercial Geografy 
Home Decoration 
Teaching 
Physics 32 



Textils 44 
Literature 41 
Vegetable Gardening 
Industrial History 



Summer Term 

Flower Gardening 
House Planning 
Children's Literature 
Mother Craft 



»omestic Science 41 
i>omestic Science 44 
leading 31 
leaching 



FOURTH YEAR 

Domestic Science 42 
Public Speaking 
Physiology 41 
Prin. of Education 



Domestic Science 43 
Dormitory Management 
Sanitation 
Teaching 



32 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM I 

Two- Year Curriculum in Agriculture 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Animal H^usbandrj- 32 



Fall 
Animal Husbandry 31 
Chemistry 31 Chemistry 32 

Zoology 31 or Botany 32 Zoology 22 
Science of Discourse Teaching Process 
Physical Training Physical Training 

Summer Term 

General Method 
Dairy Husbandry 34 

SECOND YEAR 

Soil Physics 2)^ 
*Chemistry 44 
*Commercial Geografy 
♦Physics 34 
♦Teaching 



Spring 
Horticulture 23 
Chemistry 23 
Psychology 23 
Economics 31 
Physical Training 



Farm Crops 35 
♦Chemistry 43. 
♦School Management 
♦Physics 23 
♦Teaching 



Crop Production 27 
♦Chemistry 45 
♦Prin. of Education 
♦Mechanics 36 
♦Teaching 



Students omit one of the stard subjects in the second year; fc 
terms of education and two terms of teaching ar always required. 

Students completing this curriculum ar entitled to receiv the normL 
school diploma in agriculture. Students who wish to qualify for teachir 
m high schools, receiving funds from the Federal Tresury under i\ 
Smith-Hughes Act, should complete two additional years of study in th 
College of Agriculture at the University of Illinois. 



Illinois State Normal University- 



33 



CURRICULUM J 

Commercial Course for Teachers 

78 Weeks— 26^ Credits 

FIRST YEAR 



'«33 
33 
'•33 
31, 
raininj 



Fall 
accounting 
;horthand 
^'ypewriting 
Penmanship 
'sycholog>^ 33 
%sical Training 



Spring 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
H. S. Problems 
Physical* Training 



action f 

ylDQtiii^' 
36 

jired, * 
'k 
lor 
ymuiffj 
itudj 



Winter 
Accounting 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Business Corre- 
spondence 
Physical Training 

Summer Term 

General Method 
Commercial Ge.ografy 

SECOND YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Shorthand Shorthand 

Typewriting Typewriting 

Commercial Arithmetic Economics 31 
Commercial Law 2 Salesmanship and 

Teaching Advertizing 

Teaching 

Note: OfPis Methods and Appliances wil be included in the second 
'ear of Typewriting. 
, List of Credits 

business Correspondence ^ History of Cornmerce Vl 

Accounting 3 

Shorthand 6 

Ifypewriting 3 

Commercial Law 1/4 

jrommercial Geografy 1 

.Psychology 1 

pedagogy. 1 

ifeaching 3 



Fall 

jhortharid 
fypewriting 
iistory of Commerce 
'^mmercial Law i 
reaching ^ 



General Method 

Commercial Arithmetic 1 

Salesmanship 1 

Penmanship 14 

Physical Education 11/2 

Economics 1 

Students entering with high-school units in any of these commercial 
)ranches may modify this program under advizement. 



I 



34 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The purpose of the Teachers College is to afford adequate professicU 
preparation for high-school teachers, principals, superintendents, and ^'^ 
cial teachers. Its program provides for two-years' work in the Turr 
College, two years in the Senior College. 

High-school graduates having the special preparation set forth n 
page i6 ar admitted to the Junior College and a program of study f.r 
years m length. (50 credits.) 

Students in the Normal School may transfer to the Junior College 
they hav completed fifteen units of work of secondary grade. 

Normal-School graduates ar admitted to the Senior College and to 
curriculum two years in length. (24 credits.) 

College graduates ar admitted to the Senior College and to a spec 
professional curriculum one year in length. (14 credits, eight of them I 
education and teaching.) 

All students completing the prescribed curriculum receiv the degi' 
of Bachelor of Education. 

Students completing the curriculum of the Junior College may rec 
the normal-school diploma, if their credits include five terms in educati 
and two terms of teaching with a grade not lower than 80. 

The program of the Teachers College is largely electiv. The dec 
courses fall into two lists, designated B, and A. 

First year and second year students may select from List B. 
Students of the Senior College must select two of their four elect 
courses from List A, the others may be chosen from List B. No cour 
in List A may be taken unless its prerequisits in the Junior College h; 
been completed. College graduates may choose their electivs from a) 
list, or from the normal-school programs approved by the president. Tv 
of the three terms in practis teaching listed in the Senior College may i 
taken in the second year. One must be taken in the last year. 

Students in the Teachers College ar required to elect some maj. 
subject in which they ar to make at least nine credits. The student is ex- 
pected to take also such other courses related to his major as ar pr 
scribed by the hed of the department in which the major lies. As a ru 
the electivs chosen should run thru the year. 

Students in the Teachers College ar subject to the same general r 
quirements relating to platform speaking, physical training, attendance r 
general exercizes, and general decorum as apply to normal-school student 
^ Students admitted to the Teachers College who ar found deficient i 
writing, spelling, composition or oral expression ar required to take 
special course in such subject during the second term. 

V. 



Illinois State Normal University 



35 



TEACHERS COLLEGE CURRICULUM, K 

150 Weeks— 50 Credits 
The required studies in pedagogy scheduled for the second year may 
e deferd until the third year. 

\\ Two substitutes may be taken for stard courses to make up conditions. 
tjee page 19. 

FIRST YEAR 



tiiel 



Fall 
flem. Psychology 
[Music 2 or 31 or 
I'hysiology 31 
^sical Training 
Electiv B 
i;iectiv B 



ifledv 



Fall 
jreneral Method 
Reading 31 
aectiv B 
^ectiv B 



da'i 



^i 



Ichool Adminstra- 
tion, or 

•Auc. Psychology, or 
ilistory of Education 
lectiv A, or B 

^jd^lectiv A 

^, Electiv A 

m 

tot 



Winter 
Grammar 31, or 
H. S. Problems 
Music 2 or -31 
iPhysiology 31 ^ 
Physical Training 
*Electiv B 
Electiv B 

Summer Term 

Economics 
Electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Winter 
School Management 
* Public Speaking 
Electiv B 
Electiv B 

THIRD YEAR 

School Adminstra- 

tion, or 
Educ. Psychology, or 
History of Education 
Electiv A, or B. 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 

FOURTH YEAR 

Teaching 
Electiv A, or B 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



Spring 
Teaching Process, or 
H. S. Problems, or 
Grammar 31 
♦Drawing i 
Physical Training 
♦Electiv B 
Electiv B 



Spring 
Prin. of Education 
Science of Discourse 
Electiv B 
Electiv B 



School Administra- 
tion, or 
Ethics, or 

History of Education 
Electiv A, or B 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 



^'caching 
illectiv A, or B 
ilectiv A 
Llectiv A 

Three electivs of rank B may be substituted 
i. First year students ar excluded from all 
ubjects. Two terms of teaching may be elected 



Teaching 
Electiv A, or B 
Electiv A 
Electiv A 

for two electivs of rank 
classes in senior college 
in second year. 



3^ 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



ELECTIV COURSES IN THE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE 



List B— Junior College 



Fall 
Arithmetic 31 or 32 
Physics 33 
Chemistry 31 
Zoolog-y 31 
Botany 32 
Geografy 32 
History 31 or 36 
Political Science 31 
Literature 32 
Literature 35 
Latin Method 31 
Latin 34 
French 31 
Spanish i 

Mechanical Drawing 
Machine Drawing 
Drawing 4 and 7 
Design 31 

College Algebra 41 
Physics 41 
Chemistry 41 
Chemistry 43 
fPlant Morfology 41 
*Plant Pathology 44 
*General Zoology 41 
Bacteriology 45 
fEntomology 44 
Nature Study 41 
tGeografy 41 
*Geology 44 
*History 41 
fHistory 44 
* Sociology 43 
fSocial Problems 44 
*American Poetry 42 
fBritish Poetry 45 
Debating 41 
The Speaking Voice 42 
Latin Composition 45 
French 41 

tTaught 1918-19 and 
*Taught 1919-20 and 



Winter 
Geometry 31 or 32 
Physics 34 
Chemistry 32 
Zoology 32 
Biology Method 
Geografy 34 
History Method 34 
Political Parties 32 
Literature Method 31 



Spring 
Algebra 31 
Mechanics 36 
Chemistry 33 
Botany 31 
Taxonomic Biology 
Geografy 35 or 36 
History 32 

Municipal Problems 33 
Hist, of Eng. Lang. 33 



Hist, of Eng. Liter. 33 Hist of Am*. Liter. 34 
JLatin-tng. Etymology 33Caesar-Cicero Method , 



*Latm 41 
French 32 
Spanish 2 

Mechanical Drawing 
Furniture 
Drawing 5 and 6 
Art Appreciation 38 
List A— Senior College 



*Latin 42 
French 33 
Spanish 3 
Bench Work 
Architectural Draw. 
Drawing 8 
Painting 3^ 



Trigonometry 41 
Physics 42 
Chemistry 42 
Chemistry 44 
Plant Physiology 42 
*Plant Pathology 44 
*General Zoology 42 
Advanst Physiology 
fOrganic Evolution 45 
Nature Study 42 
tGeografy 42 
*CHmatology 45 
^History 42 
fHistory 45 
^Economics 41 
tEconomics 42 
^English Drama 43 
fBrowning 46 
Platform Reading 45 
Dramatic Reading 43 
fTacitus 43 
French 42 

in alternate years thereafter, 
in alternate years thereafter. 



Analytics 42 

Physics 43 

Astronomy 31 

Chemistry 45 

fPlant Ecology 42 

*Bacteriology 45 

*General Zoology 43 

Sanitation 

fEconomic Entomol. 

Nature Study 43 

tGeografy 43 

*Cons. Nat. Resources 

*History 43 

tHistory 46 

*Amer. Indus. Hist. 45' 

tEng. Indus. Hist. 46 

*The Novel 44 

ti9th Century Prose 47 

Literature 41 

Ad. Public Speaking 44 

tDe Senectute 44 

French 43 Mi 



I 



■^i 



ERS 



Illinois State Normal University 



37 



n 



Drai, 



Fall 
irithmetic 32 
rrammar 21 
leografy 21 or 32 
Reading 21 
*honics 
Physical Training 



Algebra 22 
'sychology 33 
■oology 31, or 
iotany 32 
Color 
Design 



CURRICULUM L 

The Three- Year Curriculum 

114 Weeks— 385^ Credits 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter Spring 

Arithmetic 31 * Algebra 21 

^Grammar 22 (6 wks.) Science of Discourse 
*Geografy 31 (6 wks.) *Music 2 or 31 
Teacher and School 31 
U. S. History 31 



Physical Training 
fSpelling or Writing 

Summer Term 

Orthografy 

Reading Method 32 or Z3 

Any Electiv 

SECOND YEAR 

Geometry 31 
General Method 34 
*Reading 31, or 
*Zoology 32, or 
♦Public Speaking 

THIRD YEAR 



♦Drawing i 
♦Botany 31 or 33 
Physical Training 



♦Geometry 2)'2, or 
Physiology- 31 
Civics 21 
Teaching 



♦Physics 22 

or Chemistry 31 
♦Modern History 35 
Geografy 34, 35, or z^ 
Prin. of Education 



:onomics 31 Chemistry 31 

Physics 21 or 33 or Physics 34 

(Literature 22 ♦Shakspere 23 

leaching Teaching 

School Management 

No students may omit both Literature 2 and Shakspere. 

fSpelling and writing ar to be taken only if student is deficient. 

Electivs may be chosen according to the rules on page 24. 

If Latin or German is taken thruout the course, six majors may be 
imitted. 

This program is pland for teachers of upper grades. Teachers of 
>wer grades should choose substitutes from programs B or C. 



38 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM M 

The One- Year Currkulum for Country Teachers 



For Graduates of the Tenth Grade 



Mensuration 22 
Geografy 12 
U. S. History 21 
Physical Training 
*Civics II 
*Nature Study 11 
*Reading 11 
♦Drawing 2 
*Music 2 

♦Primary Handwork 
♦Phonics 4 



36 Weeks— 13 Credits 

Country School 

Teaching 
Arithmetic 21 
Physiology 21 
Physical Training 
*U. S. History 22 
♦Orthografy i 
♦Physics II 
♦Manual Training 
♦Household Art 21 
♦Household Science 



Grammar 12 
Country School 

Problems 
Nature Study 12 
♦Agriculture 22 
♦Reading 11 
♦Primary Handwork , 
♦Music 2 

♦Reading Method 32 
♦Children's Literature 
♦Bench Work 



Students should elect one stard subject (or pair) in addition to 1; 
required subjects at the top of the list. Other electivs may be taken insll 
of the required subjects if approved by the Dean. No pupil may be c- 
tified as having completed this year's work until the pupil has shown 
examination or class-room work, proficiency in the branches required i 
a third-grade teachers' certificate. 

CURRICULUM N 

Two- Year Curriculum for Country Teachers 

For Graduates of the Eighth Grade 

72 Weeks— 25 Credits 



Nature Study 11 
Mensuration 22 
Composition 11 
Orthografy and 

Phonics 4 
Physical Training 



Geografy 12 
Civics II 
U. S. History 21 
Reading 11 



FIRST YEAR 

Percentage and 

Bookkeeping 
Drawing 2 
Physical Training 
♦Domestic Science 
♦Manual Training 



SECOND YEAR 

Country School 

Organization 
Physiology 21 
U. S. History 22 
♦Household Art 21 
♦Manual Training 
♦Agriculture 21 
♦Design 



Nature Study 12 
Geografy 11 j 

Country School 

Teaching 
Primary Handwork 32J 
Physical Training 
Music 



Reading Method 32 
Children's Literature 
Country School 

Problems 
Grammar 12 
Arithmetic 21 



it.; 



Illinois State Normal University 



39 



CURRICULUM O 

For students who hav completed curriculums M or N and desire the 
egular normal-school diploma. 

114 Weeks— 38 Credits 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall 
}rammar 12 
Mgebra 11 
Zoology 31 
Geografy 34 
gymnastics 3 



Winter 
Public Speaking 36 
Algebra 12 
Physiology 31 
♦Zoology 32 



Summer Term 



Spring 



♦Physics II 
Reading 21 
Algebra 13 
Botany 31 
Rhetoric 23 



Any two electiv courses, Rank B or C. 



!i\ncient History 23 
ijPsychology 33 
jljeometry 21 
jl^Botany 32, or 
!*Debating 41 



Political Science 
'jPhysics 31 or 33 
Literature 22 
reaching 



SECOND YEAR 

Medieval History 24 
Literature 21 
General Method 
Geometry 22 



THIRD YEAR 

Shakspere 23 
Chemistry 31 

or Physics 34 
School Management 
Teaching 



Modern History 35 
Reading 31 
♦Geografy 35 or 36 
♦Geometry 32 
♦Drawing 35 and 38 



Principles of Education 
Physics 32 or 

Chemistry 31 
Economics 31 
Teaching 



Stard subjects ar electiv. It is expected that in the first year and in 

e summer term students from section M wil arrange to take the electivs 

breviously omitted from program M. One term of Geografy is required. 

' Students from section N ar required to take before graduation enuf 

idditional courses from program P to make a total of fifteen units of 

ntrance credit, and twenty-six normal-school credits. 

Students from section M and N who wish to take up any of the spe- 
:ial programs A-K should take from program P preparatory courses as 
arranged with the Dean. 



40 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



CURRICULUM P 

The Preparatory Curriculum 
The preparatory curriculum is intended for students old enuf to en 
the norma school, who, because of their maturity and diligence, ar able 
complete the equivalent of a high-school course in less than four schc 
years. 

It is not intended for students who expect to engage in teaching aft 
one or two years' attendance in the normal school. Such students shou 
take curnculums M or N. 

It is recommended for mature students who wish to take the soeci 
curriculums A to K but lack the high-school preparation required 

Expenenst teachers who wish to begin at once upon any of tl 
curnculums A to K may arrange with the President or Dean to sele 
part of their work from the preparatory program, part of it from tl 
special curriculum. 

Preparatory credit is reckond in units, a unit being the equivalent ( 
36 weeks of high-school work with daily recitations requiring preparatio: 
Ihe numerals after the various term courses indicate the fraction of 
unit coverd by the term's work. 

Students of the required age who hav completed the eighth grade an 
hav had no high-school work must complete fifteen units of preparator 
work. Students who hav completed a partial high-school course ma> 
m consultation with the President or Dean, select from the preparator 
program the units to be taken to complete the fifteen. 

The stard courses ar electiv. Each student is required to take on 
stard subject each term in addition to the required subjects at the too 
;he list. ^ 

One term of Orthografy and Phonics should be included in ever- 
student's curriculum. 

Public speaking is required daily for one term, weekly thruout th 
entire course. The total credit allowd is one unit. 

Holders of second-grade teachers' certificates without high-schoo' 
work to their credit may shorten this program by passing an examination 
in such subjects as they ar prepared to pass. 

Holders of second-grade certificates who hav taught two years ar 
allowd one-half unit preparatory credit for each subject coverd by the 
certificate, but no such credit may be allowd in subjects where high-school 
credit is presented. 

Holders of first-grade teachers' certificates may make similar ar- 
rangements for the completion of the preparatory program. 



I 



i 



oiiifto 
I four 

ethe 



Illinois State Normal University 



41 



PROGRAM P 

The Prepabatory Program 



FIRST YEAR 

Fall Winter 

jlgebra 11 % Algebra 12 1/^ 

iomposition II Vs Algebra 15 % 

jlgebra 14 % Public Speaking 26—% 

leading 11 , Vs Elem. Physics 11 — % 

Ihysical Training 1-6 Physical Training __i-6 

pivics II % *Economics 11 % 

Manual Training — % *Manual Training — % 
liDomestic Science — % ^Domestic Science __% 

qiiival, i-atin II % *Latin 12 % 

pr«H'rench 11 % French 12 % 

"^^^ " SECOND YEAR 



anyol 

an to 
itfi 



Spring 

Algebra 13 % 

Algebra 16 % 

Orthografy % 

Geografy 21 % 

Physical Training __i-6 

♦Reading 21 % 

♦Manual Training % 

♦Domestic Science —% 

♦Latin 13 % 

French 13 Vs 



eometry 21 % Geometry 22 % Geometry 32 V2 

rammar 12 % Rhetoric 23 Vs Literature' 21 V2 ^^ 

ology 3-1 V2 Physiology 21 % Botany 31 V2 — -^i^. 

mer. Hist. 21 V2 *Amer. Hist. 22 V2 English Hist. 36 V2 

pommer. Geog. 37— Vi ♦Zoology 32 % ♦Music & Draw. V2 

iSewing 31 % ♦Sewing 32 Vs ♦Sewing 33 % 

j.Vlechan. Draw. % ♦Mechan, Draw. — Vs ♦Mechan. Draw. % 

[Latin 14 % ♦Latin 15 % ♦Latin 16 % 

ench 21 % French 22 % French 23 % 



dill 



y'y THIRD YEAR 

Ihysics 21 V__ Vi Chemistry i 

literature 22 % Reading 3 

j.ncient Hist. 23 Vi Medieval Hist. 24 _ 

[jBotany 32 % ♦Astronomy 

\\xt 32 % ♦Art 34 or 35 

! Chemistry 31 V2 ♦Chemistry 32 V2 

tiLatin 21 % ♦Latin 22 V2 

.-V2 
-Vs 

-Vi 



^french 24 % ♦Arithmetic 2 

kbanish 31 Vi French 25 __ . 

I^lesign 31 V4: Spanish 32 _-. 



Physics 22 1 Vi 

Shakspere 23 V2 

Modern History 35—% 

♦Algebra i V2 

Art 36 or 38 Vs 

♦Chemistry 33 V2 

♦Latin 23 V2 

Blackboard Draw. —% 

Commercial Art % 

French 26 Vs 

Spanish 33 V2 



42 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

THE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

The act of the State Legislature creating Township Scholarships in ,e 
state normal schools for the benefit of graduates of the eighth gr'e 
obliges these institutions to provide academic courses for such holders.! 
these scholarships as do not intend to become teachers, and also for s h 
as ar looking to teaching but ar still too young to enter upon the regt r 
normal-school programs. 

Tuition is free to all holders of township scholarships. 
Other students of suitable age, character, and preparation may e 
admitted upon payment of tuition at the rate of eighteen dollars per te 
or six dollars per study where partial work is taken. Attendance is limi 
to 230. 

Students whose tuition is to be paid from public funds should secii 
the necessary permits early in the fall term. 

The high-school students ar seated in a separate study hall in chai; 
of a principal and three teachers, who devote their entire time to the 
struction and care of these high-school students and to the supervision 
their work. 

On pages 43-45 five programs of study ar outlind ; one with Latin a 
German for such students as expect to enter college, another designd < 
pecially for girls, giving a large place to household economy, a commerc 
program, a manual training program, an agricultural program. Physic 
training and music must be taken at some time during the first thi 
years. Monthly rhetorical exercizes ar required of all students. 

It is the intention to develop this department into a model high-scho 
While the value of liberal culture and the demands of citizenship wil r 
ceiv due recognition in the arrangement of its courses, it is proposed 
meet the growing demand that the high-school course shall prove direct 
servisable in preparing for high efficiency in useful occupations. Accor- 
ingly there ar arranged five chief programs, each four years in lengt 
differing in the prominence given to particular groups of studies, ai 
looking respectivly toward the speaking and writing professions, medic 
and agriculuture, engineering and bilding trades, commerce, and the hous 
hold arts. 

Graduates of the University High School ar admitted without exar 
ination to all universities and colleges belonging to the North Centra 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. sj 

Holders of township scholarships and others who contemplate enterin 
the University High School ar requested to register as early as is possible 
Registration may be by mail. 

A special bulletin describing the University High School wil be fur 
nisht upon application. « ^ 

I 

t 



Illinois State Normal University 



43 



Mi 


j FOREN LANGUAGE CURRICULUM 


»S,i| 




FIRST YEAR 




'*,! 


Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


'^"':, L.h 


itin I 


Latin 2 


Latin 3 




imposition i 


Literature i 


Literature 2 




Igebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




tiysical Science i 


Physical Science 2 
Music 

SECOND YEAR 


Botany i 




Esar 4 


Caesar 5 


Cicero 6 




Dmposition 2 


Literature 3 


Literature 4 


"'■LCIil- 


reek History 


Roman History 


Medieval History 


'1 


Dology I 


Zoology 2 


Botany 2 






or Physiology 


or Physiology 


3M| 


1 


Freehand Drawing 
THIRD YEAR 






icero 7 


Ovid 8 


Vergil 9 


imetoJ 


or French i 


or French 2 


or French 3 


or Spanish i 


or Spanish 2 


or Spanish 3 


iterature 5 


Composition 3 


Literature 6 


litbLitii 


Modern History 


Modern History 


Civics 


lane Geometry 


Plane Geometry 


Plane Geometry 


trdesyi 




FOURTH YEAR 




imM 


ergil 10 


Livy II 


Horace 12 


M Fh 


or French 4 


or Tacitus 13 


or Cicero 14 


hefirsi 


or Spanish 4 


or French 5 


or French 6 


iterature 7 


or Spanish 5 


or Spanish 6 


1!;. U 


hysics 


Literature 8 


or Industrial History 


dhiglH 


. S. History 


Physics 


Literature 9 


«5hip, 


or Mathematics 


U. S. History 


Physics 




or Mathematics 


Economics 


ipfopa 






or Mathematics 


prove i 

OW.A 


1 COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM 


mint 




FIRST YEAR 




studio 


Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


ttOOi,! 


enmanship and 


Business Methods 


Business English 


ndliiel 


Spelling 


Literature i 


Literature 2 




omposition i 


General Mathematics 


General Mathematics 




eneral Mathematics 


Physical Science 2 


Botany i 


fitlKiiti 


hysical Science i 


Music 




ofthQ 




SECOND YEAR 






-ccounting 


Accounting 


Accounting 


^ei 


ommercial Arithmetic 


Commercial Arithmetic Medieval History 


utiM 


omposition 2 


Literature 3 


Literature 4 


» B|W 


oology I 


Physiology 


Physical Geografy 


iJb 




THIRD YEAR 




horthand and 


Shorthand and 


Shorthand and 


r t 


Typewriting 


Typewriting 


Typewriting 




iterature 5 


Composition 3 


Literature 6 




Inited States History 


United States History 


Civics 




hemistry 

i 


Chemistry 

FOURTH YEAR 


Chemistry 




horthand and 


Shorthand and 


Shorthand, Typewriting 




Typewriting 


Typewriting 


and Offis Training 




.iterature 7 


Literature 8 


Commercial Law 


'hysics 


Physics 


Physics 




'ommercial Geografy 


Industrial History 


Economics 



44 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



MANUAL TRAINING CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 
Winter 
Mechanical Drawing 
Literature i 
Algebra 
Physical Science 2 

SECOND YEAR 
Bench Work 
Literature 3 
Freehand Drawing 
Zoology 2, or 
Physiology 
Music 

THIRD YEAR 
Furniture 
Design 

Plane Geometry 
United States History 
Gymnastics 



Fall 
Bench Work 
Composition i 
Algebra 
Physical Sicence i 



Mechanical Drawing 
Composition 2 
Mechanics Arithmetic 
Zoology I 



Pattern Making 
Literature 5 
Plane Geometry 
United States History 



Spring 
Bench Work 
Literature 2 
Algebra 
Botany i 

\Vood Turning 
Literature 4 
Bookkeeping 
Botany 2, or 
Physiology 



Furniture 
Literature 6 
Plane Geometry 
Civics 



Art Metal, or Cement 

Construction 
Literature 7 
Physics 
Commercial Geografy 



FOURTH YEAR 
Pottery, or Machine 

Drawing 
Literature 8 
Physics 
Industrial History 



Bookbinding, or 

Architectural Drawi 
Literature 9 
Physics 
Economics 



HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 
Winter 

Household Manage- 
ment 2 
Foods and Cookery 2 
Literature i 
Physical Science 2 
Zoology 2 



Fall 

Household Manage- 
ment I 
Foods and Cookery i 
Composition i 
Physical Science i 
Zoology I 



Sewing i 
Color 

Composition 2 
General Mathematics 
Physical Education 

Advanst Dressmaking 

and Millinery 
Costume Design 
Chemistry 
United States History 



SECOND YEAR 

Sewing 2 

Design 

Physiology 

General Mathematics 

Physical Education 

THIRD YEAR 
Textils 

Composition 3 
Chemistry 
United States History 



Spring 
Household Accounts 
Meal Planning and 

Serving 
Laundry 
Literature 2 
Botany i 
Physical Geografy 



FOURTH 
Cafeteria 



YEAR 



Food Preservation and ^^x^cvud 

Experimental Cookery Literature 8 
Literature 7 Physics 

Physics Industrial History 

Commercial Geografy 



Dressmaking 
Home Decoration 
Botany 2 

General Mathematics 
Physical Education 

Millinery and Advanst 

Dressmaking 
Literature 6 
Chemistry 
Civics 

Dietetics ; Advanst 
Cookery; Care and 
Literature 9 
Physics 
Economics 



I 



:M 



Illinois State Normal University 



AGRICULTURAL CURRICULUM 



45 



Fall 
lomestic Animals 
omposition i 
[anual Training 
oology I 



arm Crops 
omposition 2 
eneral Mathematics 
hysical Science i 



ement Construction 

iterature 5 

hemistry 

nited States History 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Animal Production 
Literature i 
Farm Arithmetic 
Zoology 2 

SECOND YEAR 

Soil Physics 
Literature 3 
General Mathematics 
Physical Science 2 

THIRD YEAR 

Farm Bookkeeping 

Composition 3 

Chemistry 

United States History 

FOURTH YEAR 



3il Fertility Farm Management 

iterature 7 Literature 8 

hysics Physics^ 

ommercial Geografy Industrial History 



Spring 
Orchard and Garden 
Literature 2 
Mechanical Drawing 
Botany i 



Crop Production 
Literature 4 
General Mathematics 
Physiology 



Farm Machinery 
Literature 6 
Chemistry 
Civics 



Animal and Plant 

Improvement 
Literature 9 
Physics 
Economics 



The Agricultural Science in the foregoing program is in strict accord- 
ice with the program for agricultural high schools recommended by the 
linois Educational Commission. 

It is expected that the strictly agricultural work shall occupy about 
le-fourth of the time of the student, and that it shall be taught from a 
national standpoint to prospectiv or probable farmers. 

Practically the entire range of farm affairs is coverd by this course, 
id it is believd that a good basis will be establisht for intelligent reading 
r the young farmer. The Normal University farm is not used for ex- 
iriment to discover new agricultural truth, but for demonstration of good 
rming methods, of the effects of good fertilizers and rotations, of proper 
lection and treatment of seed, of modes of cultivation, of the proper 
re of live stock, and other details of farm practis. With the facilities 
id equipment at the command of the State Normal University, it is be- 
ivd that the proper material, curriculum, and method of an agricultural 
gh school can be workt out. 

The other studies in the agricultural program ar chosen with regard 

their value to the farmer-citizen. They comprise natural science, 
)vernment, and such studies in English as wil lead to fair skill in the use 
the mother tung and to an appreciation of the best literature. 



46 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



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llliHois State Normal University St 

STATEMENT OF COURSES | 

IN DEPARTMENTS | 

j EDUCATION 

Course 31. The Teacher and the School. An introductory course for 
pinners. All terms. Text: Colgrove. 

Course 32. The Teaching Process. A similar course for older stu- 

ts and teachers of some experience. All terms. Text: Strayer. 

Course 33. Elementary Psychology. A study of the principal types 

mental behavior as related to lerning and teaching. Prerequisit: an 

ementary knowledge of the nervous system. All terms. Texts: Pills- 

iry's Essentials of Psychology, Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child 

udy. 

Course 34. General Method. A study of the method of the recita- 
n. Prerequisit: Education 33. All terms. Texts: Charter's Methods 
Teaching, McMurry's Method of the Recitation, Rowe's Habit Forma- 
n. 

Course 35. Principles of Education. A study of fundamental prin- 
ples underlying educational activities. Prerequisits : Education 33, 34. 
all, winter, spring, and first summer terms. Texts: Ruediger's Princi- 
es of Education, Schroeder's Psychology of Conduct. 

Course 36. School Management. A study of school organization, 
pervision, and management with especial attention to school hygiene, 
irerequisits : Education 33, 34. Texts : Tompkins's Philosophy of School 
\anagement, Dresslar's School Hygiene. 

Course 37. History of Education. An elementary course covering 
e period from the Renaissance to the present. Spring term, first sum- 
er term. Text: Monroe's Briefer Course. 

Course 38. High-School Problems. A junior college course to be 

ken in place of Education 32 by students who ar candidates for the de- 

of Bachelor of Education. Winter and spring terms. Prerequisits: 

aduation from a four-year accredited high school, or its equivalent, and 

jlementary Psychology 33. Texts : Johnston's The Modern High School; 

ing King's The High-School Age. 

Course 40. Educational Psychology. An application of the princi- 
es of general psychology, acquired in Course 23, to the educational 
■oblems of the kindergarten and the primary grades. Fall term. Pre- 
quisit: Course 33. Texts: King's Psychology of Child Development; 
ewey's The School and Society, 1915 edition ; Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals 

Child Study, and Goddard's Revision of the Binet Measuring Scale of 
itelligence. 



I 



52 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 40A. Educational Psychology. First Half. A similar coui 
for teachers of the high school and upper grammar grades, principa 
and superintendents. Fall term and first summer term. Prerequis 
Course 33- Texts : Thorndike's Educational Psychology, Briefer Cour 
and Parker's Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

Course 41. Educational Psychology. Second Half, This course de? 
with tests of nativ intelligence, and educational scales. Prerequisit • Cour 
33 and Course 40 if possible. Texts : Thorndike's Educational Psycholoc 
Briefer Course; Goddard's Revision of the Binet Measuring Scale 
Intelligence, and Yerkes-Bridges-Hardwick's Point of Mental Ability 

Course 42. The Evolution of Morality. The factors, processes ar 
mam lines of moral development. Offerd in the spring term of ivei 
numberd years to alternate with Course 43. Prerequisit: Good cours 
m the social sciences— history, sociology, economics, and politics Tex 
Dewey and Tuft's Ethics. 

Course 43- Social Ethics. This course examins the ethics of leadir 
vocations, such as business, the law, engineering, bilding, speculativ ente 
prizes, parenthood. Spring term 1919. Prerequisit : see Course 43. Tex 
Coffin's The Socialized Conscience. 

Course 44. Ancient and Medieval Education. A study of the hi' 
toric background of modern education. Fall term. Prerequisits : goo 
courses in ancient and medieval history. Texts: The first and secon 
volumes of Grave's History of Education. 

Course 45. Modern European Education. A study of the leadin 
educational theorists and reformers in relation to education in both Europ 
and America. Winter term. Prerequisits : good courses in modern Eurc 
pean history. Texts : the second volume of Graves's History of Educo 
tion, and Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education. 

Course 46. Education in the United States. A genetic study of Amei 
lean education. Spring term. Texts: Dexter's Education in the Unite. 
States, and Thwing's Education in the United States Since the Civil Wa^ 
Course 47. School Administration.— Fimnce, organization and super 
vision. Fall term. Text : Button and Snedden's Administration of Pub 
he Education in the United States. 

Course 4S. School Administration.— The application of scientifi 
methods in determining the efficiency of a school system. Winter terir. 
Strayer and Thorndike's Educational Administration; McMurry's Elemen 
tary School Standards. 

Course 49. High School Administration. Spring term. Prerequisits 
Education 37 and 38. Texts: Brown's The American High School; John- 
ston's The American High School. 



I 



aisit:C| 

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itic, 



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Illinois State Normal University 5^ 

MATHEMATICS | 



ARITHMETIC 



CoMrj^ J J. Arithmetic Review. This course is designd as a review 
f the fundamental operations, factoring, common and decimal fractions, 
nd denominate numbers. It is a necessary groundwork for all the other 
Durses in Arithmetic. Students who do not hav an accurate and redy 
nowledge of the above-named topics take this course as a prerequisit to 
11 other mathematical courses. Fall and winter terms. Texts: Smith's 
'omplete Arithmetic. 

Course 21. Method in Arithmetic for the First Six School Years. 
'he Illinois State Course of Study forms the basis of the work. This 
ourse is required of all students in Sections M and N. All terms. Pre- 
*''<'i squisits: Courses 22 and 23. Text: Cook's Advanst Arithmetic. 

Course 22. Mensuration.- The purpose is to arrive experimentally at 
lodes of measuring areas and volumes. 

Course 23. Percentage and Business Arithmetic. A consideration of 
le applications of percentage with special emfasis upon the usages of 
le commercial world. All terms. Text: Thurston's Business Arithmetic. 

Course 31. Method in Arithmetic. A course similar to Arithmetic 21 
lyoii or high-school graduates and experienst teachers. Text : , Cook and 
ropsey. 

Course 32. Mensuration and Percentage. A course for mature and 
vanst students. The principal topics of the seventh and eighth years' 
rork of the State Course of Study ar included. All terms. Texts : For 
fensuration, Felmley's Eighth Year Arithmetic. For Percentage, Thurs- 
i nHbn's Business Arithmetic. 
rn 

i^m BOOKKEEPING 

Course 11. (Six Weeks). This course has for its aim to prepare 
feachers for the work in bookkeeping outlined in the State Course of 
ftudy. Other courses ar offerd in the Department of Commerce. Fall, 
'inter, spring, first summer terms. Semi-major. Text: The H. M. 
Lowe Budget System, No. loi. 

ELEMENTARY ASTRONOMY 

Course 31. A course intended to enable students to read an almanac 
Ind teach mathematical geografy intelligently. Winter term. Text: 
llowe's Elements, 



54 Annual Catalog and Course of Study ■ -; 

ALGEBRA ' 

Course ii. Beginning Algebra. Fall, spring and first summer term 
Text: Taylor's Elements of Algebra. 

Course 12. Intermediate Algebra. A continuation of Course i: 
Winter and summer terms. 

Course 13. Algebra Completed. A continuation of Course 12. Sprin 
term. 

Courses 14, 15, 16. These ar preparatory courses running thru th 
year and intended for young students who hav not studied algebra. The 
count as the equivalent of Courses 11 and 12. Text: Hawkes, Luby, an 
Touton. 

Course 21. Algebra Review. A course extending thru linear equa 
tions. Fall, spring, and first summer terms. 

Course 22. Advanst Algebra. A course including quadratics an( 
logarithms. Fall, winter, and both summer terms. Courses 21 and 22 a 
for students who hav only a partial course in algebra. Together the- 
count as the equal of Course 31. 

Course 31- Algebra Method. This course covers all important an( 
difficult questions in the subject. Spring term. Prerequisit: A strong 
high-school course in algebra equal to the requirement of the best colleges 
Text: Taylor's Elements of Algebra. 

Course 41. College Algebra. Fall term. Prerequisit: Algebra 31, 2^ 
or 34. Text : Reitz and Crathorne. 

GEOMETRY 

Text in all courses : Wentworth-Smith. 

Course 21. Plane Geometry. First Half. A strong course for be- 
ginners. Fall and first summer terms. Prerequisit : Elementary algebra. 

Course 22. Plane Geometry. Second Half. Winter and second'sum- 
mer terms. Prerequisits : Algebra thru quadratics and Geometry 21. 

Course 31. Geometry Review. A course covering the whole of plane 
geometry. Fall and winter terms. Prerequisit: A strong high-school 
course. 

Course 32. Solid and Sferical Geometry. Spring and first summer 
terms. Prerequisits : Algebra and plane geometry. 

Course 33. Algebra and Geometry Method. A course designd for 
prospectiv teachers of high-school mathematics. Spring and first summer, 
terms. Texts: Smith's Teaching of Geometry and Young's Teaching of\ 
Mathematics. 

Course 41. Trigonometry. This course includes the theory of trigo- 
nometry both in the plane and on the sfere. Winter term only. Pre- 
requisit: Plane and solid geometry, algebra. Text: Taylor, with tables^ 
in separate volume. 

Course 42. Analytical Geometry. This course covers the ordinary 
analytical methods of investigations. Spring term only. Prerequisit: 
Trigonometry and algebra. Text : Ashton. 



i; 



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Illinois State Normal University 55 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

PHYSICS 



ittjji 

Asa 



Course ii. Elements of Physical Science. Winter term. Text: 
'General Science, Barber and others. 

Courses 21 and 22. (7 hours per week). Course 21 covers the me- 
chanics of solids, liquids, gases, and heat. Course 22 covers mag- 
letism, electricity, light and sound. Course 21, fall term and both summer 
terms. Course 22., spring term and both summer terms. Prerequisits : 
algebra, geometry. Texts: Physics of the Household, Lynde, and Lah- 
Dratory Exercizes, Fuller and Brownlee. 

Courses 31 and 32. Household Physics. Courses similar to 21 and 22 
but intended for mature students in Home Economics. Fall and winter 
terms. Prerequisits: algebra and geometry. Texts: Same as in Course 21. 
Courses 33 and 34. Advanst Physics. Course 33 covers mechanics of 
Isolids, liquids, and gases, molecular physics and heat. Course 34 covers 
'^ magnetism, static and current electricity, sound, light, and radio-activity, 
curse 33, fall and first summer terms. Course 34, winter and both sum- 
mer terms. Prerequisits: A working knowledge of algebra including 
logarithms, geometry, and some previous work in physics. Texts: Prac- 
N Heal Physics, Black and Davis, and Laboratory Exercizes, Fuller and 
Brownlee. 

Course 35. Method in Physical Science for the Elementary Schools. 
Winter and spring terms. Prerequisit : high-school physics. Text : Gen- 
eral Science, Barber. 

Course 36. Applied Mechanics. A Junior College course. (3 hours 
per week recitation, 4 hours per week laboratory work, counting as 5 
hcHUrs). Spring term. Prerequisits: Physics 33 and 34 or equivalent, 
fexts: Elementary Practical Mechanics, Jameson, and Exercizes in Me- 
lt I kh^nics, Jameson. Essentials of Physics, Hering wil be used as a ref- 
.'ilii erence in all college courses in physics. 

Course 41. Magnetism and Electricity. (3 hours per week recitation, 
ij hours per week laboratory work, counting as 5 hours). Fall term. 
TBii^Prerequisit : Physics 33 and 34 or equivalent. Texts : Elements of Elec- 
tricity for Technical Students, Timbie, and Laboratory Manual, Direct and 
Alternating Currents, Clewell. 



I^JMI 



56 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 42. Light and Sound. (3 hours per week recitation, 4 hi 
per week laboratory work, counting as 5 hours). Winter term ] 
requisit: Physics ZZ and 34 or equivalent. Texts: Handbook of Aa 
tics, Harris, and Essentials of Physics, Hering. 1 

Course 43- Heat. (3 hours per week recitation, 4 hours per v« 
laboratory work, counting as 5 hours). Spring term. Prerequis 
Physics 33 and 34 or equivalent, and trigonometry. Texts: Mecha^ 
Molecular Physics and Heat, Millikan, and Heat, Randall. 

Course 44- Laboratory Assistant. Method in physics and chemil 
for the high school. (10 hours per week, counting as 5 hours). Any te 
Prerequisits : Courses 33 and 34 and Courses 31, 32 and 33 in Cherni^ 
This course may count as one term of teaching. Text: The Teaching 
Physics and Chemistry in Secondary Schools, Smith and Hall. 

CHEMISTRY 

SELECTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for the Normal-School diploma who ar conditioned 
chemistry should take Course 31 during the winter, spring, or firs? 
second summer term. Candidates for the diploma in household scie 
should take Courses 31, 32, 33, 41 and 42. Candidates for the diploma 
agriculture should take Courses 31, 32, 33, 43, 44, 45- Students prepat 
to teach chemistry in the high schools should take all the courses. 

Courses 31, 32, 33- General Chemistry. A year's work in coll 
chemistry. Only students intending to complete the year should enter' 
class in the fall. Text: A Course in General Chemistry, McPherson i 
Henderson. 

Courses 41 and 42. Organic Chemistry. Courses for students! 
home economics. (3 hours per week recitations, 4 hours per week lalj 
atory). Fall and winter terms. Prerequisit: Courses 31, 32 and 33 
their equivalent. Texts: Organic Chemistry, "^orvh. Experimental i 
ganic Chemistry, Norris. 

Course 43. Qualitativ Analysis. A course for students who exf 
to teach chemistry in high schools. (6 hours per week laboratory, 2 hd 
per week recitation). Fall term. Prerequisit: Courses 31, 32 and 33,^ 
their equivalent. Text: Qualitativ Analysis, Bailey and Cady. Ot^ 
works on qualitativ analysis ar consulted frequently. 

Courses 44 and 45. Qualitativ Ajialysis. Courses dealing especi? 
with the problems of the farm and the household. (6 hours per wr 
laboratory, 2 hours per week recitation). Winter and spring terms. P^ 
requisit: Courses 31, 32, 33 and 43. Text: Elementary Qualitativ Che- 
ical Analysis, Lincoln and Walton. 



Illinois State Normal University 57 



term, 



)i 




BIOLOGY I 

NATURE STUDY 

Course 11. Agricultural Nature Study — Fall Aspect. Fall and sum- 
mer terms. Texts: Beginnings of Agriculture, Mann. Lesson plans in 
Nature-Study Agriculture. 

Course 12. Agricultural Nature Study — Spring Aspect. The general 
jv .bian of this course is the same as in Course 11. Spring term. Pre- 
requisit: Course 11. Text: same as m Course 11. 

Course 31. Nature-Study — Material and Method. This course is 
designd for students who ar preparing to teach nature study in the grades. 
Fall, spring, and summer terms. Prerequisits : botany and zoology 
Text : Practical Nature Study, Coulter and Patterson. 

Course 41. Nature-Study Supervision. A course for superintendents 
'and supervisors of nature study. Fall term. 

Course 42. Nature-Study Organization. This course deals with the 
winter aspect of nature-study material. Winter term. 

Course 43. School and Home Gardens. Work in practical gardening, 
with experiments, methods of managing and directing children's gardens. 
iSpring term. 



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Course 31. Phanerogamic Botany. A general elementary course in 
Jbotany dealing with the so-cald flowering plants and seed plants. Spring 
and both summer terms. Texts: Coulter's Text-Book in Botany, and 
Oil Gray's New Manual of Botany. 

Course 32. Cryptogamic Botany. A general course in botany dealing 
with the so-cald non-flowering, or seedless plants. Fall and first summer 
term. Texts : Coulter's Text-Book of Botany, and Conn's Bacteria, Yeasts, 
J and Mold in the Home. 
ilwCk' Course 33. Taxonomic Biology. A study of the trees and shrubs of 
the campus and nearby plants of nativ forest; of the birds that may be 
seen here during the term; of the decorativ plants grown in the school 
garden, greenhouse, and local nurseries ; and of the wild flowering plants 
of the local flora, from the taxonomic point of view. Birds and plants wil 
be studied on alternate days, so that students may take either part of the 
course as a minor, counting for one-half credit. Spring term. Texts: 
Gray's Neiv Manual of Botany and Reed's Land and Song Birds. 

Course 34. Biology Method. Lectures and assignd readings on the 
method of instruction in biology. Winter term. Text: Ganong's Teach- 
ing Botanist. 



w V 



58 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 41. Plant Morfology. A detaild study of representativ typ 
from each of the four great groups of the plant kingdom. Fall ten 
1918-19, and each alternate year thereafter. Prerequisit: Courses 31 ai 
32 or equivalent. Text: Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes ai 
Cowles, Vol. I. 

Course 42. Plant Physiology. A detaild study of the various physi 
logical processes of plants, such as nutrition, growth and movement. Wii 
ter term. Prerequisit: Courses 31 and 32 or their equivalent. Tex 
Text-Book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles, Vol. I. 

Course 43. Plant Ecology. A study of the influence of environmei 
factors on plant structures and plant distribution. Spring term 191 
Prerequisit: Courses 41 and 42 or equivalent. Text: Text-Book of Bo 
any, Coulter, Barnes, and Cowles, Vol. II. 

Course 44. Plant Pathology. A study of the more important plai 
diseases which ar caused by fungi, bacteria, and slime molds. Fall ten 
and first half of winter term, 1919-1920. Prerequisit : Botany 31 and 32, 

Course 45. Bacteriology. A general laboratory course in bacteriolog: 
Last half of winter term and spring term 1920. Prerequisit: Botany 3 
and Z2. Text: Jordan's General Bacteriology. 

ZOOLOGY 

Course 31. Invertebrate Zoology. A general introductory course i 
elementary zoology. Fall and both summer terms. Text: Linville ah< 
Kelley's Text-book in General Zoology. ' '. 

Course 32. Vertebrate Zoology. A general course in vertebrate zoo] 
ogy, for those who ar to teach zoology in the high-school. Winter am 
first summer terms. Text: same as in Course 31. t 

Courses 41, 42, 43. General Zoology. A general college course ii 
zoology, dealing with animals exclusiv of insects. 1919-1920 and alternati 
years thereafter. Prerequisit: Zoology 31 and 32. 

Course 44. General Entomology. A general introductory coursf 
dealing with the morfology, physiology, ecology, and classification of in" 
sects. Fall term 1918. Prerequisit: Course 31 or its equivalent. Text 
Folsom's Entomology. 

Course 45. Animal Evolution. The various theoretical fases of biot 
ogy which do not require laboratory study ar considerd. Winter tern? 
1918-19. Prerequisit: Courses 31 and 32 or their equivalent. Text: Jor 
dan and Kellogg's Evolution and Animal Life. 

Course 46. Economic Entomology. This course deals specifically 
with the insect pests which affect the plants of field, garden, and orchard, 
and with those which ar responsible for the spred of human and animal 
diseases. Spring term, 1919. Prerequisit : Course 34 or equivalent. 



i 



''^ -" Illinois State Normal University 59 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Course 21. Physiology and Hygiene. An elementary course for stu- 

bnts who hav not studied zoology or physics. Text : Advanst Physiology 

M Hygiene, Conn and Buddington. 
'"sphj Course 31. The Human Body. The anatomy, physiology, and hygiene 
'^'. \ If the human body considerd from the biological standpoint. Fall, 
^^ T( Irinter, and spring terms for women only. A winter term class for men 

nly. Summer term classes include both sexes. Text: Hough and 
ivironn fedgwick's Human Mechanism. 

««n 1} j Course 41. The Nutritiv Process. An advanst course in physiology 
'^c/l dealing especially with digestion and nutrition, and required of all students 

raduating in domestic science. Winter term. Prerequisits : Chemistry 
^tp4i and Zoology 31. Text: Stile's Nutritional Physiology. 

Course 42. Sanitation and Public Hygiene. A systematic application 

f chemistry, physiology, and bacteriology to modern helth problems. Rec- 
^ol( jmmended to students who ar to graduate in domestic science. Spring 
Botany jerm. Prerequisits : Botany 32, Physiology 31 or 41, Chemistry 31, 32, .^3. 

'ext: Sedgwick's Principles of Sanitary Science, 



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GEOGRAFY 



Course 21. Elementary Physiografy. This course or its equivalent is 
rerequisit to all other courses in the department. All terms. Texts: 
Salisbury's Modern Geografy, Physiografy Note-Book, Four Pamfiets on 
mportant Topics in Geografy. 

Course 31. Human Geografy. Influence of natural conditions on 
.^HjiMhe development of the occupations of man. Winter and spring terms. 
Texts: Herbertson's Man and His Work; Bartholomew's Economic Atlas; 
^our Pamfiets on Important Topics in Geografy. (6 weeks). 

Course 32. General Geografy of the World. Covers essentially the 
jjjjj ;.ame ground as Course 21, with a larger selection of typical regions and 
^^ nore extensiv library reading. Fall term. Texts: Same as Course 31. 
12 weeks). 

Course 33. Primary Geografy. An examination of the course of 
tudy with especial attention to subject-matter and method for third, 
ourth, and fifth grades. Spring term. Texts : Dodge's The Teaching of 
leografy in the Elementary Schools; State Course of Study; Course of 
itudy in Training School; Four Pamfiets on Important Topics in 
leografy. 



'i 



60 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 34. Geografy of North America. Deals with topics of Sie 
Course of Study pertaining to North America in the fifth and sixth ye 
Fall spring and first summer terms. Texts : Four Pamflets on Import 
Topics in Geografy. Tarr and McMurry's New Complete Geografy, S^ 
ond Book. Bartholomew's Economic Atlas. 

Coruse 35. Geografy of South America. This course develop; 
method of continuous study as required in seventh and eighth years' w . 
of the State Course of Study. Texts: Bowman's South America; B- 
tholomew's Economic Atlas. 

Course 36. Geografy of the Eastern Continents. A study of A 
Africa, and Australia, covering the eighth year's work of the State Coui 
of Study. Text: Mill's International Geografy. 

Course 37. Commercial Geografy. Deals with industrial topics 
the fifth, seventh, and eighth years' work of State Course of Study, 
terms. Texts : Smith's Industrial and Commercial Geografy, Barth 
omew's Economic Atlas. 

Course 11. Elementary Physical Geografy. This is similar to Cou; 
21, but the work wil be adapted to the teaching of Fourth- Year Geogn 
as outlind in the State Course of Study. Spring term. Texts : Salisbur, 
Modern Geografy; Four Pamflets on Important Topics in Geografy. 
Course 12. Geografy Method for Country School. A thoro analy 
of the State Course of Study ; material and methods. Fall term. Tex' 
Tarr and McMurry's New Second Book; Four Pamflets on ImporU 
Topics in Geografy; Bartholomew's Atlas; Herbertson's Man and h 
Work. 

Course 41. Geografy of Europe. A regional study of the continej 
dealing with leading countries, their relation to each other, to the Unit 
States, and to the rest of the world. Fall term 1918. Texts: The C6 
tinent of Europe, Lyde ; Longman's Atlas. 

Course 42. Method in Geografy. For superintendents, principals, a; 
special teachers of geografy. Winter term 1918-19. Texts: McMurrj 
Special Method in Geografy; State Course of Study; Course of Slih 
in Training School; Four Pamflets on Important Topics in Geogrf^ 
Course 43. Advanst Physiografy. A course for high-school teacl|il 
Spring term 1919. Text: Salisbury's Physiografy. (12 weeks). 

Course 44. General Geology. A study of geologic processes usuai 
treated in physical geografy, followed by historical geology. Fall tCF 
1919. Text: Chamberlain and Salisbury's Introductory Geology. 

Course 45. Climatology. A study of the atmosfere; climate as 
geografical factor; its influence on man and the industries. Winter ter 
1919-20. Text: Milham's Meteorology. 

Course 46. Conservation of Natural Resources. A study of the na 
ural resources of the United States and the world. Spring term 192 
Text : Van Rise's The Conservation of Natural Resources in the Unite 
States. 



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I HISTORY 



Course 21. The Founding of the American Nation. Fall, spring, 
d first summer terms. Text: Vormdin's Advanst History. 

Course 22. The Growth of the American State. This course con- 
ues the work of Course 21, bringing the narrativ down to the present, 
inter and second summer terms. Text: Forman's Advanst History. 

Course 23. Ancient History. A course for non-high-school graduates. 
11 and summer terms. Text : The Ancient World, West. 

Course 24. Medieval History. This course is intended for the stu- 
nts who hav had ancient history. Winter and summer terms. Text: 
story of Western Europe, Robinson. 

Course 31. American History to the Civil War. This course is in- 
ded for students who hav studied U. S. History in the high school or 
10 hav taught the subject. Winter and first summer terms. Text: A 
art History of the United States, Bassett. 

Course 32. Recent A^mican History. An intensiv study of our de- 
opment since the Civil War. Spring and both summer terms. Text: 
Short History of the United States, Bassett. 

Course 33. History Method in Lower Grades. This course is to giv 
^tmi^^ student an understanding of the meaning of history and its purposes 
the grades. Fall term. 

Course 34. History Method for High Schools. The scope of history 
|the high school, its aims, methods of study and recitation. Winter term. 
incipali, I Course 35. Modern European History. This is a study of the ex- 
Mcili jtision of Europe since the i6th century. Spring and summer terms. 
ui}\\ xt: History of Western Europe, Robinson. 

0>Jj \ Course 36. English History. This course develops the narrativ of 
wltta^glish History from the beginning of the Tudor period to the present. 
U term. Text : Short History of England, Cheney. 
' Course 41. American History. This course is an intensiv study of 
; colonial and revolutionary periods of American History. It is in- 
ided for prospectiv high-school teachers of history, politics, and social 
iiniattjfence. Fall term 1919. 

Course 42. This is similar in method to Course 31 and covers the 
riod from 1783 to the Civil War. Winter term 1919-20. 

Course 43. This is a study of Reconstruction, with the resulting 
ttmiBjthern problems; growth of municipalities; commercial expansion; 
ikSS of corporation, and other recent problems. Spring term 1920. 

Course 44. European History to 1648. This course, as well as 
»urses 45 and 46, ar intended for special students in history and pro- 
;ctiv social science teachers. Fall 1918. Text : Robinson and Beard. 

Course 45. European History 1648-1815. Winter 1918-19. Text: 
•binson and Beard. 

Course 46. European History 1815-igoo. Texts used in Courses 44 
46 ar Robinson and Beard's The Development of Modern Europe (2 
Is.), and the accompanying Readings (2 vols.). 



m 

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62 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

CIVICS 

Course ii. Elementary Civics. This course is for beginners who Iv 
not studied civics in the high school nor had any experience in teach g 
it. Fall and spring terms. Text: Forman's The American Repuhlu 

Course 21. Advanst Civics. Intended for students who hav had e 
elementary work or hav had experience as teachers of this subject. Ill 
and summer terms. Texts : Civil Government in the United States, Fis ; 
Advanst Civics, Forman. 

Course 31. Political Science. This course deals with the nature, sec 
and methods of political science. Fall term. Text: Introduction to 1- 
litical Science, Garner. 

Course 32. Political Parties and Party Machinery. A study of e 
history of political parties in the United States. Winter term. Tex 
Parties and Party Machinery, Macy ; History of the Presidency, Stanwo 

Course 33. Municipal Government. A study of the problems of c 
government. Spring term. 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 






Course 11. Elementary Economics. This course, for Section P, ai ; 
to introduce the student to economic questions of the day. Winter ter 
Texts: Ely and Wicker's Elementary Economics. 

Course 31. Economics. This course is for all students, whether th 
ar looking towards teaching in the grades or in the high school. All terr-. 
Text : Seager's Principles of Economics. W 

Course 41. Advanst Economics. One or more great economic top'r^ 
and the related problems of the day ar studied. Winter of 1918-19, alt 
nating with Advanst Economics 42. Prerequisit: Economics 21. 

Course 42. Advanst Economics. This course wil be taught in t 
winter of 1919-20 and is a course similar to and alternating with Advai 
Economics 41, but devoted to different topics and problems. Prerequis 
Economics 31. 

Course 43. Sociology. This course includes a discussion of t 
scope of sociology and of the nature of society. Taught every spri 
and summer term and in the fall of odd-numberd years. Only studer 
who hav completed Economics 31 or an equivalent course may be admitt 
to the fall term classes. Text: Hayes"s Introduction to the Study 
Sociology. 

Course 44. Social Problems. This course wil be taught in the fall ■ 
1918 and alternate years thereafter. Prerequisit: Economics 31. E 
wood's Sociology and Social Problems and Wolfe's Readings in Socioloc 
form the basis of the work. 

Course 45. American Industrial History. A text-book (Bogart's 
constructed on the chronological plan, is used, but the lines of develo] 
ment ar kept distinct and continuous thruout the course. Spring ter 
1918. Prerequisit: Economics 31. 

Course 46. English Industrial History. This course is similar t 
and taught alternately with, Course 45. Spring term 1919, etc. Pn 
requisit: Economics 31. Texts: Cheney's Industrial and Social Histor 
of England; Hayes's British Social Politics. 



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Course 21. Poetry and The Novel. Classroom study of the minor epic 
n Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, and the novel in George Eliot's 
^iilas Marner. Outside of the class a further study is made of narrativ 
erse. Winter and summer terms. Texts: Sohrab and Rustum, River- 
ide Literature Series. Silas Marner, Appleton's. The Princess, Rolfe's. 
dylls of the King, Rolfe's. 

Course 22. Poetry, Essays or Speeches, and The Novel. Lyric and 
larrativ verse in the volume of selections from Wordsworth, made by 
^'interljlatthew Arnold, and two books of the great epic Paradise Lost form the 
lasis of the classroom work. The outside work consists of reading from 
merson's Essays, First Series, selected essays from Lamb's Essays of 
Alltj i''^*^' o^ Arnold's Culture and Anarchy, or Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, 
peeches by Burke or Webster, and a novel. 

Course 23. Shakspere. Two plays ar studied in detail in class. Out- 
ide of the class three more plays by Shakspere or Marlowe ar red and 
ben carefully discust. Text: Shakspere, Arden, Rolfe's, Hudson's, or 
porter's First Folio Edition. 

Course 31. Literature Method. In the fall term the course givs more 
Prjrqi jareful attention to the primary grades, in the winter to the high school, 
1 the spring to the upper grades. All terms. Text: Colby's Literature 
nd Life in the School. 

Course 32. Literary Types. A study of lyric and narrativ verse, of 
le essay, the novel, and the drama. Fall and summer terms. Text: 
ohnson's Forms of English Poetry. 
\t StJt Course 33. History of Literature. This course covers the history of 
nglish literature down to the nineteenth century. Winter term. Text: 
Ijjjjl loody and Lovett. 

Course 34. History of English Literature Since 1800 and of Amer- 
j^u^ :an Literature. Spring term. Texts : Moody and Lovett's History of 
'■nglish Literature, Halleck's History of American Literature, Calhoun 
nd MacAlarney's Reading from American Literature. 

Course 35. English Poetry. This course is ment to giv some per- 
3nal knowledge of the tresures of English poetry, lyric and narrativ. 
cm Chaucer to Wordsworth. Fall and both summer terms. Text: 
lanly. 

i Course 41. College Course in Shakspere. From fifteen to twenty 
lays ar studied. Spring term. Text : MacCracken, Pierce, and Durham's 
ttroduction to Shakspere. 



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^4 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 42. American Poetry. This is a course in rapid reading 
the American poets from Bryant to Moody and Peabody. Fall term 15, 
and alternate years thereafter; and summer terms. Text: Page's Chi 
American Poets. 

Course 43-. English Drama. A study of the development of t 
drama from the miracle plays down to the closing of the theaters 
Parliament. Winter term 1918-19 and alternate years thereafter. Tex 
Neilson's Chief Elizabethan Dramatists. 

Course 44. The English Novel. Cross's Development of the Engli 
Novel is used as a guide in some mesure, but the library is the main d 
pendence for material. Spring term 1919 and alternate years thereaftt 
and summer terms. 

Course 45. British Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. Fall and sur 
mer terms. Text: Page. 

Course 46. Browning. For this course the student should hav eith. 
Macmillan's or Houghton Mifflin's one-volume edition of Browning 
works. Winter term 1918-19 and alternate years thereafter, summer term 

Course 47. Nineteenth Century Prose. This covers the most ir 
portant representativ English and American prose writers of the nin. 
teenth century. Spring term 1919 and alternate years thereafter, and sun 
mer terms. Text: Alden. 



LANGUAGE AND GRAMMAR 

Course I. Orthografy. The purpose of this course and of the cours 
in spelling is to prepare students to teach the orthografy outlined for th 
seventh and eighth years in the Illinois State Course of Study. A six 
weeks course. All terms. Semi-major. Text: Cavins. 

Course 2. Spelling. (6 weeks, or longer). All students ar offer 
an examination in spelling in the sixth and twelfth weeks of each tern 
Those who show by such examination the ability to spell ninety out of on 
hundred familiar words, such as lose, led, busy, until, separate, reference 
occurd, notable, ridiculous, accommodate, recommend, ar excused fron 
further work in spelling. Those who do not pass the examination ar re 
quired to take a course of six weeks, or longer if necessary, and to take 
it the following term. Due attention is given to the simplified forms rec- 
ommended by the Simplified Spelling Board and authorized by the New 
Standard and the New International dictionaries. 

No student is recommended for a teacher's certificate or for a posi- 
tion to teach or for a diploma until he has carried spelling. 



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Illinois State Normal University 



Course 3, Penmanship. Writing Drill. (6 weeks, or longer). A 
,. .-jourse to enable students to improve their writing if it is manifestly illeg- 
'ble or in bad form. It is a required subject for those whose writing 
s distinctly poor. Penmanship according to the Palmer Method is taught, 
bso in another section vertical script better adapted to schoolroom use. 
vlinor. 

Course 4. Phonics and Dictionary Work. (6 weeks; one-half credit). 
This course is required of all students, and should be taken as soon as 
iracticable after m.atriculation. 

Students who ar proficient in the use of the dictionary may be excused 
rem taking the course, the test of proficiency being an examination offerd 
tn the first day of each term, and on succeding days until completed. All 
'arms. Texts: Metcalf and DeGarmo's Dictionary Work and the Standard 
^esk Dictionary. 

Course 11. Composition. A course for all students who lack early 
raining in composition. Fall and spring terms. Texts : Huntington's 
"^ojnposition and Woolley's Handbook of Composition. 

Course 12. English Grammar. A study of the English sentence. Fall 
f,nd spring terms. Text : Gowdy. 



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j Course 13. The Parts of Speech. Prerequisit : Grammar 12. Text: 

A study of the sentence including 



iowdy. 

Course 21. English Grammar. 
erbals. All terms. Text : Gowdy. 

Course 22. The Parts of Speech. (Six weeks). Prerequisit: Gram- 
ar 21. Winter, spring and summer terms. Semi-major. Text: Gowdy. 

Course 23. Rhetoric. This is a practical course in the science of 
etoric and art of composition. Scott and Denney's Composition-Rhetoric 
the text. 

Course 31. English Grammar. A comprehensiv course covering the 
jentence and parts of speech. All terms. Text : Gowdy. 

Course 32. Science of Discourse. This is an advanst course based 
n Barrett Wendell's English Composition and Herbert Spencer's Philos- 
phy of Style. All terms. 

Course 33. Hisiory of the English Language. A brief course showing 
ibe development of English idioms, and the chief phenomena of gram- 
atical and orthografic change. Spring term. Text: History of the 
Inglish Language, Emerson. 



*66 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

READING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Course ir. Elementary Reading. An elementary course designd r 
those students who hav had little experience in oral reading. Fall, wir r 
and spring terms. Major or semi-major. Text: PhiWips' Natural Dt s 
in Expression. 

Course 21. The Reading of Prose. The first consideration in ts 
course is that literary appreciation must precede vocal expression. 1 
terms. Major or semi-major. Text: Classics for Vocal Expressi , 
Curry. 

Course 31. The Reading of Poetry. The primary purpose of ts 
course is to show what poetry is and to train the student in render^ 
it orally. Major or semi-major. All terms. Texts: English Poetry, 
Principles and Progress, Gayley and Young. 

Course 32. How to Teach Reading. Primary Reading. This isi 
course that discusses the various problems that arise in teaching read:: 
in the lower grades. Semi-major. Text: Pedagogy and Psychology ' 
Reading, Huey. 

Course 33. Method in Advanst Reading. A study of the problems tl; 
arise in the intermediate and upper grades. Semi-major. Winter, spri 
and summer terms. Text : How to Teach Reading in the Public Schoc 
Clark. 

Course 34. The Art of Story-Telling. A course designd to meet t 
needs of the teacher in the elementary grades and the high school. Wi 
ter, spring and summer terms. Major or minor credit. Text: For t 
Story Teller, Bailey. 

Course 45. Platform Reading. An advanst course pland especial 
for those who feel the need of skill and finish for appearing in publ 
Winter and first summer terms. Text: Lessons in Vocal Expressio 
Chamberlain and Clark. 

Course 36. Public Speaking. The preparation and delivery of origin 
speeches. All terms. Text: Effectiv Speaking, Phillips. 

Course 41. Argument. The theory of argumentation, with practis 
preparation of briefs and oral debates. Fall term. Major. Text:/4f( 
mentation and Debating, Foster. 

Course 42. The Speaking Voice. This course aims to lay the basis 
a correct use of the speaking voice. Fall term. Text: The Speaki 
Voice, Everts. 

Course 43. The Analysis and Presentation of the Drama. The dn 
matic work of the school wil grow out of this course. Winter term. 

Course 44. Advanst Public Speaking. The basis of the work is th 
larger speech on the more formal occasion than the extemporaneous speec 
demands. Spring term. Prerequisit : Extemporaneous Speaking. Text 
The Art of Public Speaking, Esenwein and Carnagey. 



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LATIN, FRENCH, SPANISH 



X 

Two forms of the junior curriculum in Latin ar offerd; the first of 
ten credits for beginners, the other of four credits for students who hav 
ialredy completed three years' work in Latin. 

Beyond these, five advanst courses (Courses 41, 42, 43, 44, 45) ar oflFerd. 

Beginners ar advized not to take up the study of Latin unless they 
propose to complete at least two years' work. 

THE FULL LATIN CURRICULUM 

The entire curriculum as provided for beginners consists of ten terms, 
numberd as follows : 

Courses 11, 12, and 13, D'Ooge's First Latin Book. 

Courses 14 and 15, Selections from Greenough, D'Ooge and Daniel's 
Junior Latin Book, Bennett's Latin Grammar. 

Courses 21 and 22, Cicero's Orations, D'Ooge. 

Course 23, Ovid, Kelsey. 

Courses 25 and 26, Vergil's Aeneid, Frieze. 



LATIN-METHOD COURSES 



Course 31. Method of Beginning (First Year) Latin. Fall term. 
Prerequisit : An academic knowledge of the usual first year's work. Text : 
[iBennett'sT^ac/ttnc^ of Latin.. Appendix of Bennett's Grammar. 

Course 32. Caesar and Cicero Method. The first six weeks of this 
course ar an inductiv study of the Latin ways of expressing those rela- 
tions that offer to beginners the most difficulty. The second six weeks' 
study is based on Cicero's orations. Winter term. 

Course 33. Latin-English Etymology. The work wil be of an ad- 
vanst character, but only two years of Latin ar required as a prerequisit. 
''^'B I Spring term. 

Course 34. Method in Vergil and Ovid. Careful translation of the 
text and study of scansion. Fall term. 

Students who take the Latin-Method Courses above should take also 
two of the following courses : 

Course 41. Advanst Reading. Livy. Winter term 1919-20. Pre- 
requisits: Courses 31-34 above, or four years of high-school Latin. Text: 
'Lord. 

I Course 42. Advanst Reading. Horace. Spring term 1920. Pre- 
requisit: Courses 41-43. Text: Smith. 

I Course 43. Advanst Reading. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. This 
icourse alternates, as to the years it is taught, with Course 41. Winter 
term 1918-19. Prerequisit: Courses 31-34 or four years of high-school 
Latin. 



68 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 44. Advanst Reading. Cicero's, De Senectute and De Am 
icitia. This course alternates as to the year it is given with Course 4: 
Spring of 1919. Prerequisit : either Course 41 or Course 43. 

Course 45- Advanst Course in Writing Latin. A preliminary revicA 
of elementary work, followd by the writing of connected discourse mor 
difficult in character. Fall term every year. 

FRENCH AND SPANISH 

The courses in French and Spanish to be offerd in the year 1918-1. 
hav not yet been definitly organized. Two years work in French wil be of 
ferd in the Teachers College, one in Spanish. Elementary courses wi 
be offerd in the high-school department. 

I i 

t PUBUC SCHOOL MUSIC J 

i l 

Course i. For Beginners. Songs lernd thru imitation. Text: Ele- 
ments of Music in Song, Westhoff. Minor. 

Course 2. Elements of Musical Notation. Sight-reading in unison, 
and two, three, and four-part harmony. Minor. All terms. Text: Ele- 
ments of Music in Song, Westhoff. Songs for Sight Singing, Series One. 
^ Course 31- Advanst Sight Reading. A course for students who hav 
finisht Course 2 or its equivalent, and who intend to teach in intermediate 
or grammar grades. All terms. Minor. Texts : Progressiv Music Series, 
Book Four. Songs for Sight Singing, Series Three. 

Course 32. Method in Primary Music. The complete song- -\^ a basis 
for the child's music education. All terms. Prerequisit: Music 2. Texts: 
Progressiv Music Series, Books One and Two. Minor. 

Course 33. Music Method in the Grammar School. This course covers 
the work for grades four to eight inclusiv. Fall term. Prerequisit: 
Course 31. Practis teaching in the Model School. Text: Progressiv 
Music Series, Book Three. 

Course 34. High School Music. Bibliography of high-school music. 

Chorus conducting. Organization of an orchestra; glee clubs. Winter 

term. Prerequisit: Course 2 and 31. \ 

Course 35. Elementary Harmony. Musical History. Music Appre- 

ciatioii. Form m Music. Spring term. Prerequisit : Courses 2 and 31. 

^ The Choral Club. The Choral Club— a chorus of mixt voices— meets 
twice each week. Compositions of the better class and excerpts from 
standard cantatas, operas, and oratorios ar studied and prepared for public 
presentation. Five concerts ar given each year. 

The Glee Clubs. Practis in part singing may be further developt in 
connection with the work of the Girls' and Boys' Glee Clubs, which meet 
twice a week for pratcis. 

^ The Orchestra. Students who play upon orchestral instruments ar 
given an opportunity for practis in concerted playing. The orchestra 
holds one rehersal each week. 

The Band. The Normal University owns fifteen instruments, upon 
which regular lessons ar given until sufficient skill is gaind for concerted 
playing. The band and orchestra furnish music for the social functions 
of the school. 



Illinois State Normal University 69 

I ^ 

I ARTS AND CRAFTS ± 

X 

There is a growing demand for teachers who can introduce elementary 
instruction in art into the public schools of the state. In many respects 
this school affords excellent facilities for the training of special teachers. 
The kindred arts ar being rapidly developt with good equipment. The 
professional studies of the normal school enable the students of art to lern 
the proper setting of art courses in the public-school curriculum. 

All students in the special program of Art and Design wil leave for 
the use of the institution at least one example of their work in sketching, 
painting, etc., and one of their work in crafts. 

REPRESENTATIV ART 

Course i. Freehand Drawing. This course treats simply of the tech- 
nique of drawing as a language. All terms. It is recommended that 
Courses 35 and 38 be elected to supplement this course. Minor. 

Course 2. Drawing for Rural Schools. Study of objects in mass 
drawing that ar interesting in color and shape. Fall and winter terms. 
Minor. 

Course 31. Primary Teachers' Course. Suggestions in regard to 
illustrativ drawing, clay modeling,, elementary object and nature drawing 
make up the first part. The second part includes effectiv blackboard 
drawing. Fall and spring terms. It is recommended that Courses 35 and 
38 be elected to supplement this course. Minor. 

Course 32. Freehand Perspectiv. This course is introduced by a 
discussion of the scope, function, divisions, and kinds of drawing, which 
leads to the problem of convergence and foreshortening. Two hours daily. 
Fall term. 

Course 33. Light and Shade. Winter term. Minor. 

Course 34. Cast Drawing. This is advanst work in light and shade 
for students in the special art and design course, intended to develop the 
skill necessary for a supervizor of drawing. Two hours daily. Winter 
term. Prerequisit : Course 33. Major. 

Course 35. Color. This course considers the spectrum, tints, shades, 
tones and intensities, color characteristics and a theory of color harmony. 
Fall and spring terms. Minor. 

Course 36. Color Practis. This is a continuation of Course 35 for 
students in art and design. Spring term. Two hours daily. Prerequisit: 
Course 35. 

Course 37. Oil Painting. A study of picture-making; how to paint, 
Iwhat to represent, and how to organize a picture. Spring term. Two 
hours daily. Prerequisit : Course 35. 



70 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 38. Art Appreciation. A study of art, architecture, an 
sculpture including a brief outline of the history of art as presented t 
painters from the Renaissance period thru the modern schools. The scho( 
is well supplied with a good reference library, pictures, lantern slides cast 
and other collections. Winter term. Texts: D^Gavmo's Art Appreciatim 
and Van Dyke's History of Art. 

Course 39. Art Organisation. The relativ importance of differer 
branches of public-school art, and their relation to each other. Sprin 
term. Minor. 

COURSES IN DESIGN 

Course 31. Principles of Design. Fall and Winter terms. Minor. 

Course 32. Primary Handwork. A course arranged on the basis o 
materials used in the elementary grades to giv opportunity for expressioi 
m construction work. All terms. One hour per day. Minor. 

Course 33. Art Metal. Copper and silver ar the metals used in thij 
course. Two hours daily. Fall term. Prerequisit : Course 31. 

Course 34. Pottery. This course includes modeling, flat and rounr 
coil bilding, the use of the wheel and molds, decoration, glazing and firing 

Course 35. Bookbinding. This course deals with problems in card- 
board construction and bookbinding for the grades and high school. In- 
teresting exercizes in booklet making, book repairing, and rebinding form 
the main part of the course. Spring term. One hour daily. Minor. 

Course 36. Home Decoration. The course includes a study of the( 
construction of the home and its furnisht details from the standpoint of 
the designers. Winter term. Two hours a day. i 

Course 37. Costume Design. Design principles and color theory ar, 
here studied in terms of dress. The course includes practical problems in': 
representation, costume draping in cloth or paper, collecting and classify-i 
ing dress in order to create interest in proper and artistic dressing. Fair 
term. Two hours daily. \ 

MANUAL TRAINING '' 

The contribution of manual training to a complete and rounded educa-i 
tion is now generally recognized, and the number of schools where it is', 
given a place in the program is constantly increasing. The demand for' 
teachers who can conduct the work continues to be far in excess of the 
supply. 

It is the intention to place special emfasis upon those forms of manual 
training that ar practicable under ordinary conditions in Illinois with 
reasonable expenditures for equipment and materials, and to giv compara- 
tivly little attention to those lines of work which ar impracticable by rea- 
son of the great expense involvd. 

Course i. Benchwork in Wood. The aim of this course is to teach 
the important tool operations used in woodworking. No credit wil be 
given towards graduation for less than 120 hours' work. Students taking 
the special manual training course must complete 240 hours' work. All 
terms. Texts: Workshop Note Book, Greene; Handwork in Wood, Noyes. 




Illinois State Normal University 7i 

'^^WMcourse 31. Wood-Turning and Pattern-Making. The fundamental 
^■^^^'«^i)ol processes used by the wood-turner wil be taught by demonstration 
' ^liescliljid practis at the lathe. Spring term. Prerequisit: Course i. Text: 
''''^^^^^%\*attern-Making Note Book, Greene. 

^fnafii, Course 32. Furniture Construction. Using woodworking machinery. 

he use of woodworking machinery by advanst students in manual train- 

'■'''^ differg ig tends to make the work far more vocational and givs; a training on 

'^^^- Spr^ arious machines that is hard to get in a commercial shop, where the work- 

len lern to work only one or two machines. The various methods of 

-rood-finishing receiv due attention. Winter term. Prerequisit : Course i. 

I Course 33. Elementary Woodwork and Carpentry. The purpose of 

ilinor, f lis course is the laying out of a course of study for the fifth and sixth 

thebasisl rades, with a group of models for each grade, suitable for any school. 

^rexpressj phe second half of this course is designd for preparing teachers to teach 

be fundamental principles of carpentry in the upper grades and high 

ised in tS ichool. 

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■■ Course 34. Organisation of Manual Training. This course, is pland 
or persons who wish to teach manual training. Lesson plans, equipments, 
nd courses of study ar prepared by the students. Library reading and 
cajheme writing ar required. Fall term. Prerequisit: Course i. Text: 
Bennett's Manual Arts. 

Course 35. Mechanical Drawing. This is a course for beginners and 
tidudes working drawings, lettering, geometrical drawing, problems in 
•rojection, intersections of solids, development of surfaces, tracing and 

indpoiiit!} *Iue printing, and a few drawings in isometric projection. Students may 
Iiurnish their own instruments, or rent them from the department. Taught 

rthwrylivery term. Two hours a day for 24 weeks, 2 credits. Text: Bennett's 

yMva^rohlems in Mechanical Drawing. 

ndcte* Course 36. Machine Drawing. The special conventions of machine 

i«ing, fJi 'irawing, sketching, detailing, assembling, etc., ar presented to the student 

^ n this course. This is an advanst course for students who wish to be 

irepared to teach mechanical drawing in high schools. Two hours per 

lay. One credit. Prerequisit : Mechanical Drawing. Text : Mechanical 

drawing for High Schools, Sloan, Evans, and Zimmerman. 

Course 37. Architectural Drawing. Architectural letters, conven- 
iens, details, sections, study of materials, specifications, and mechanical 
)erspectiv ar taught. Two hours per day for twelv weeks. One credit, 
^'rerequisit : Course 35. Text: Mechanical Draiving for High Schools, 
5loan, Evans, and Zimmerman. 

Course 38. History of Manual Training. (Minor). This course 
■ollows the efforts of educational reformers in Europe in introducing the 
Inanual arts into the schools. The history of the manual arts in the United 
States and the development by the various movements which hav produced 
educational and vocational couses wil be followd carefully. Lectures, 
eading and written work. Winter term. 

Course 39. Furniture Designing and Construction. Manual training 
n its best form is now to a large extent applied design. Craftsman furni- 
ure with pleasing lines, spaces, and attractiv proportions wil be designd 
ind some of the articles constructed and finisht in soft artistic shades. 
Library reading on design, cabinet construction, and tool use wil be re- 
luired. Spring term only. Prerequisit: Courser. 



72 Animal Catalog and Course of Study 

I HOME ECONOMICS 

I 

The work irx home economics is pland to meet the requirements , 
the Smith-Hughes Act as interpreted by the State Board of Vocation 
Education. The full curriculum extends over four years and includes : 

1. Practical courses in clothing, foods, and household managemei 
gardening, etc. 

2. Technical courses in design, chemistry, and other sciences. 
3- Academic courses in English, civics, economics, etc. 
4. Professional courses in education including practis teaching, i 
Besides this four-year curriculum known as G— H Major, there is 

three-year curriculum which omits twelv of the fifty courses, and also ^ 
two-year curriculum in domestic art and a two-year curriculum in domest) 
science. 

A normal-school diploma wil be granted to any student completL 
either of these two-year curricula, or two years work in home economic 
provided that the twenty-six major courses selected from the home-ecd 
nomics curriculum include : 

Nine practical courses. 

Six professional courses including two terms of practis teaching. 

Two credits in design and physical training. 

Three credits in science including physiology. 

Six other credits. 

The last provision is to prepare teachers of home economics fo] 
elementary schools. 

The degree, Bachelor of Education, is granted upon the completioil 
of the full four-year course. 

HOUSEHOLD ART 

It is the purpose of these courses to provide for the adequate training 

of teachers in Household Art. T 

Courses 31, 32. 33, 41 may be taken as electivs by students in othei 

departments. ' 

Materials ar furnisht by students for all courses except Course 41, 

for which a fee of two dollars is charged. 

Course 21. Rural School Course. This course has for its aim the 
presentation of such work as can be accomplisht in rural schools :— cro- 
cheting, knitting, hand and machine sewing, darning and mending, and the 
planning, cutting, fitting, and finishing of simple garments, including a linen 
or gingham dress. Winter term. 

Course 31. Garment Making. This course deals with the fundamen- 
tal principles of construction. It givs practis in fundamental stitches, in 
handsewing, in the use of the sewing machine, in the drafting of patterns, 
and in the planning, cutting, fitting, and finishing of simple garment?. 
Fall, spring, and both summer terms. Major. Text: Clothing for Women, 
Baldt. 



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Illinois State Normal University y^ 

Course 32. Dressmaking. This course givs practis in drafting and 
odeling of patterns, in the use of commercial patterns, in the cutting, 
tting, and finishing of a shirt waist, a tailord cotton skirt, and a some- 
what elaborate linen or cotton dress. Winter and first summer term, 
'rerequisit: Course 31 or its equivalent. 

Course 33. Needlework. Work in handsewing, darning, mending, 
rocheting, knitting, embroidery. A study of laces and ornamental stitches. 

Course 41. Millinery. This course includes the simple processes in 



ocatii iullinery, making and trimming, renovating and remodeling hats and a 
"eludes: udy of the material used. Winter term. 

Course 42. Advanst Dressmaking. This course givs extended practis 
1 modeling and draping. It includes the making of a tailord woolen skirt 
id a crepe or chiffon waist and a silk gown, with special stress upon the 
roper handling and finishing of these different materials. Spring term, 
rerequisit: Course 32. 

Course 43. The Theory of Household Art. This course brings to- 
other the subject-matter in construction stitches, textils, design, and eco- 
omics, and organizes it as the basis for the selection of suitable problems 
present to classes in elementary and high schools. Fall term. Pre- 
complejEjquisit : Two courses in Education, three courses in Household Art. 
ieconoii i Course 44. Textils. A study of fabrics from the standpoint of the 
! lioinei||i)nsumer. Major. Fall term. Text: Woolman's Textils. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 



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The courses in Household Science ar pland to cover the six terms 
f two regular school years and one summer term. 

Courses 31, 32, and ^^ in Household Science ar open to regular stu- 
ents who wish to take up the work as an electiv without pursuing all the 
^rrelated studies. Classes in Household Science ar limited to eighteen 
lembers. 

A fee of three dollars per term is charged to cover the cost of ma- 
rials consumed by the student. 

Course 21. Household Science for Country Teachers. This is a 
oecial course of 120 hours in the study of foods, marketing, cooking, and 
rving, adapted to the needs of the country home. Winter term. 

Course 31. Food Principles and Cookery. A course of cookery based 
ri a study of Food Principles, designd to acquaint the student with all the 
indamental processes of cookery and the most attractiv methods of 
irving. Fall and summer terms. Daily, two periods each day. 

Course 32. Cookery ay\d Household Management. The second course 
cookery includes a systematic study of the duties of the housekeeper, 
/inter term and first summer term. Prerequisit : Course 31. 

Course 33. Cookery and Household Management. The third course in 
')okery deals with the planning and preparation of menus, the choice and 
*rangement of appropriate garnishing and correct methods of servis. 
he second course in household management is devoted to the study of 
larketing, serving, and laundry work. Prerequisit: Courses 31 and 32. 
ext: Food Products by Henry C, Sherman. 



,|i 



74 Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 41. Cookery IV. Institutional Cookery, Preservation of Foo 
The first part of this course is devoted to the canning and preserving 1 
fruits and vegetables and the making of jellies. The institutional woi 
carries out the planning of menus, serving of meals and the handling ( 
large quantities of material. Fall term. Prerequisits : Courses 31, 32, 3 

Course 42. Cookery V includes the care and feeding of infants ar 
children, invalid cookery, home nursing, and advanst cookery. Winti 
term. Prerequisits: Courses 31, 32, ZZ- Text: The Home Nurse 
Handbook of Practical Nursing by Charlotte A Aikens. 

Course 43. Dietetics and Nutrition. Spring term. Texts: A Lai 
oratory Hand-book of Dietetics by Mary Swartz Rose, Chemistry of Foo 
and Nutrition by Henry C. Sherman. 

Course 44. Organisation of Household Science. A study of th 
meaning and history of the household science movement, equipment 
courses, and methods of study. Demonstration. Methods of Publicity. 

Course 45. Dormitory Management. Practical experience in all th 
activities of an institutional home. The course includes twenty hours i 
the care and feeding of infants in the Normal Baby Fold. This is 
practical course to meet the requirements of the Smith-Hughes Act. 



I AGRICULTURE I 



The two-year program in agriculture is designd for students who wis! 
to become teachers of agriculture in township high schools, consolidatec 
schools, village or city schools. In addition to giving the students a there 
course covering the entire field of scientific agriculture, it is well fortified 
with courses in physical and biological science. These courses form ar 
excellent foundation for the study of scientific agriculture, and equip the 
student for teaching two or more lines closely allied with each other. 

Students may take the two-year program and secure the regular Nor- 
mal-School Diploma, after which they may either teach or take the remain- 
ing two years' work at the University of Illinois. Students ar urged to 
fininish the four-year program before attempting to teach because of the 
better training and greater possibilities which the graduate from the four- 
year program obtains. 

The Normal University owns and operates an excellent farm of about 
ninety acres, lying close to the campus. The sole purpose of this farm is 
to demonstrate good farming methods to the students taking the courses 
in agriculture. 




lis, 



Illinois State Normal University 7S 

le farm is primarily a dairy farm, a feature which increases the ac- 
tvties of the farm and adds to the student's possibilities of practis and 
Nervation. Pure-bred horses, cattle, swine, and poultry ar grown. 

The farm is equipt with a modern house, barns, and other farm bild- 
and sufficient modem machinery for a farm of its size. 

A five-field rotation is carried on, and a careful and thoro system of 
fm bookkeeping is followd, recording all data of costs and receipts. 
Use records ar available to students in the course, enabling them to 
s dy scientific farming from the business point of view. 

Course 21, Agriculture for Country Schools i. This course is rec- 
p mended to the students who ar preparing to teach in the country schools 
al wish to do considerable work in agriculture. It- may be taken insted 
the nature study program in country school curriculums. The work wil 
jjdevoted to the study of beef and dairy cattle, horses, hogs, and sheep. 
||)blems in milk testing, management of herds, management of poultry, 
t;l the care and feeding of animals wil be taken up. Major. Winter term. 
,ijor credit in curriculums M and N. Text: Essentials of Agriculture, 
iters. 

Course 22. Agriculture for Country Schools 2. This course is rec- 
unended to those students who expect to teach in country schools. It 

be taken in lieu of the nature study program in the curriculums for 
. ntry school teachers. The course consists of a study of farm crops 
t'h special reference to their economic importance and their relation 
tthe soil. The formation, classification, and management of soils wil 
a) be taken up. Major. Spring term. Text: Essentials of Agriculture, 
Alters. 

Course 31. Elementary Stock Judging. A study of the history, char- 
a sr, and form of the horse, cow, pig, and sheep ; the market classes and 
ides of the various animals, their capacity for the production of milk, 
nat, wool, work, and speed. Some time is given to the identification and 
sring of the various types of poultry. Fall term. Texts: Harper's 
/imal Husbandry for Schools, Day's Productiv Swine Husbandry, Gay's 
Fiductiv Horse Husbandry. 

Course 32. Stock Feeding. A study of the classes of food nutrients 
al their functions in the animal body. The extent and nature of the 
dnands for food for maintenance, growth, fattening, milk, wool, and 
vrk. Choice of feeding stuflfs and the compounding of rations. Win- 
t< term. Text : Henry and Morrison's Feeds and Feeding. 

Course 33. Orcharding and Gardening. A study of plant propagation, 
pining, spraying, cultivation, and, of injurious insects. Spring term. 
Ixts. Bailey's Principles of Fruit Growing and Bailey's Vegetable 
Crdening. 

Course 34. Dairy Husbandry. A course in the operation of the 
Ibcock test, the testing of herds, the detection of adulterated milk, and 
t: testing of milk, cream, butter, or cheese for butter, fat, acid, bacteria, 

«1 adulterants. Summer term. Texts: Washburn's Productiv Dairy- 
. Eckles' Dairy Cattle and Milk Production. 



7^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 

Course 35. Cereal and Forage Crops. A study of the varietie 
wheat, corn, oats, barley, and rye. The judging, grading and storin 
the cereals for seed or market. A study of the forage crops which e 
mand the attention of the farmer in the autum months wil be taken 
Alfalfa and silage wil receiv considerable attention. Fall term. Tt 
Hunt's Cereals in America. 

Course 36. Soil Physics. A study of the formation and classifica,n 
of soils; capillary, hygroscopic, and gravitational water; the effect' )f 
dramage and color of soils on soil temperature; the granulation \d 
puddling of soils ; the preparation of the seed bed and the proper til ^e 
for the various crops. Winter term. Texts: Lyon and Pippins' 6^0 f/^ ^ 
Mosier and Gustafson's Laboratory Manual for Soil Physics. 

Course 37- Crop Production. This course includes a study of le 
methods of planting and cultivating the various cereal and forage cr s 
the treatment for insect, weed, and fungous enemies of the cereals d 
forage plants, the conservation of the water supply for cereal and foirg 
crops and the curing and marketing of hay. Spring term. Text : Liviis- 
ton's Crop Production. 

Course 38. Landscape Gardening. A course in the arrangement d 
planting of the trees, shrubs, and flowers necessary for the proper decct- 
tion of home and school grounds. The care of flowers, trees and shr s 
m winter and summer. The pruning of trees and shrubs. Summer tei 
Text: Government and State Bulletins. 

Course 39- Vegetable Gardening. A practical course in the use'^ 
hot bed, and cold frame, and in transplanting; in the varieties of kitr 
vegetables; in planting, cultivation, and harvesting. Spring term 



I COUNTRY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

The purpose of this department is three-fold. i. To prepare teach 
for country schools. 2. To assist country teachers activly engaged 
teaching. 3. To help stimulate rural progress. 

Two elementary curriculums ar off erd" thru the Country School L 
partment: a one-year curriculum (M) for students who hav had tv 
years of high-school work and a two-year curriculum (N) for graduat 
of the eighth grade. The completion of these counts two years towa 
the regular Normal-School Diploma. Curriculum O provides the remai 
ing courses needed for graduation. Upon finishing either of the eleme 
tary curriculums students ar given a special certificate testifying to tl 
accomplishment of this work. These certificates ar evidence of qualific 
tion for third-grade teacher's certificates. 



[j lUinois State Normal University 77 

i COUNTRY SCHOOL SPECIAL COURSES 

Course 21. Country School Teaching. This course deals with what 
teach and how to teach it. Winter, spring, first summer terms. Texts : 
larter's Teaching the Common Branches; The State Course of Study. 

Course 22. Country School Management. This course deals with 
untry school ideals and how to realize them; with school property and 
iw to care for and improve it. Winter term. Text : The Rural School, 
s- Methods and Management, Culter and Stone. 

Course 23. Country School Problems. This course deals with the 
strict as a unit of study — its condition, its needs, and its possibilities. A 
idy of the social groups — the school children, the young people not in 
hool, and the householders— and the school itself. Text : Rural Life 
d Education, Cubberly, and Bulletins. 

Course 24. Observation and Participation. In February or March 
e students who ar completing their studies in this department ar sent 
!t for three weeks to separate country schools, to live with the teacher, 
observe, to assist in the management, care, and instruction of the school. 



COMMERCE 



t 

In September, 1914, a department of Commercial Branches was es- 
lisht to prepare teachers in this fast-growing type of vocational educa- 
|in. 

I The program is seven terms in length, covering two years time. The 
[llowing courses ar offerd to those who enrol in the department. 
: Course 11. Bookkeeping. The inductiv development of the principles 
; double-entry bookkeeping and their practical application in as many 
jts as the length of the term wil permit. Semi-major. Text: Budget 
\i, Commercial and Industrial Bookkeeping, Rowe. 

Course 31. Accounting. Three terms' work in the theory and practis 
accounts, beginning with the more simple transactions and records of a 
lall retail business under a single proprietor. This small business is later 
ilarged to include wholesaling and the ownership is changed to a partner- 
ip. Students ar carefully traind not only in the clerical work of book- 
eping but also in the analytical work of the accountant. In the spring 



78 



Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



term, upon the completion of the assignd work in wholesale partneni, 
the type of business is again changed and the student is introduce t 
corporation accounting. Cost accounting as applied to the manufaire 
of a staple product is studied and many problems in factory accounts ffis 
management, and production factors, ar taken up. Text: Bookketna 
and Accountancy, H. M. Rowe Company. 

Opportunity for practis teaching in bookkeeping in the Unive 
High School is given to students who hav successfully completed the 
mal course in Accounting. 

Course 32. Accounting. The theory of accounts as developt frorrht 
standpomt of the practising accountant. Solution of accountancy prob n^ 
and prmciples as applied to business statements, balance sheets, analis 
bankruptcy the designing of bookkeeping systems, etc. Summer t- 
Prerequisit: Course 31. Text: Elements of Accountancy, Khin 

SHORT HAND 

Courses 31, 32, 33- Shorthand. (First Year). The developmen ,f 
fonetic writing as conceivd by Gregg and workt out in his manual, le 
Manual is supplemented by work in shorthand, penmanship, and in i> 
gressiv exercizes intended to increase finger dexterity and a thoro uni-- 
standing and skilful application of the principles of shorthand T(.- 
Manual of Shorthand, Gregg. 

Courses 34, 35, 36. Shorthand (Second Year). A careful review f 
the Gregg Manual, followd by progressiv dictation taken from stand d 
dictation texts and covering many types of business correspondence. D-- 
mg the winter term is it expected to bring the student to a writing sp i 
of approximately 120 words per minute, and to that end there is m i 
dictation extending over a wide variety of material, e. g., sermons, - 
dresses, syllabi, testimony, legal forms, etc. Teaching methods ar int- 
duced in the spring term and students ar encouraged to increase tlir 
shorthand skill to verbatim speed. Texts : Gregg Speed Practis, Ore . 
Shorthand Dictation Exercizes, Eldridge. 

TYPEWRITING 

Courses 31, 32, 33- Typewrting (First Ygzt). The touch method 
sisted upon in this course. The work done in the course is based upon ! 
subject-matter as containd in a standard text, such as the Fritz-EIdrid 
Expert Typewriting. Supplementary work begins during the winter tei 
and consists of direct dictation of plain copy for speed and accuracy, pla 
copy of sight, and blindfold dictation. In the spring term, shorthai 
transcript work is begun. The formal work includes thirty-six lesso 
in the text as a minimum requirement for one year's credit. Thirty wore 
net, per minute, is the rate pupils ar expected to reach at the end of tl 
spring term. Text : Expert Typewriting, Fritz-Elridge. 



Illinois State Normal University 79 

Courses 34, 35, 36. Typewriting (Second Year). The second year's 
vork begins with a thoro review of fingering, to be followd by that por- 
ion of the text not included in the outline for the first year. A portion 
)f the time is devoted to transcript work. Tabulation, rough drafts, and 
pecial work in typing makes up the schedule for the winter term. Fre- 
[uent speed tests as well as examinations for proficiency certificates, ar 
riven. During the spring term offis appliances ar ixsed in connection with 
his course, and the students ar given the course in offis training as set 
brth in' Offis Training by Sorelle. Students ar expected to reach the cer- 
ificate speed of sixty words net, per minute, on plain copy. Text : Expert 
typewriting, Fritz-Eldrige ; Offis Training for Stenografers, Sorelle. 
erm of the first year and includes such review of the general rules of 
grammar, punctutation, and sentence construction as the instructor deems 
lecessary as an introduction to the writing of business letters, advertize- 
nents, pamflets, etc. Especial attention is given to correspondence from 
he point of view of selling. Text : English for Business Uses, Cody. 

Course 34. Commercial Law. This is one of the most important of 
he commercial branches and is very widely taught in the high schools. 
rwo terms ar given to the consideration of Commercial Law. The fea- 
ures to which most attention is given ar Contracts, Negotiable Instruments, 
)ales, Agency, Insurance, Bailments, Partnership, Credits and Loans, 
rorporations, Real and Personal Property, and Settlement of Estates. The 
.reparation of legal forms is included in the course. Text : Elements of 
business Law, Hufcutt. 

Course 35. Commercial Arithmetic. This subject is ofiferd for one 
erm in the second year. The course is designd to include the usual appli- 
ations of arithmetic to business organization, management, accounting, 
nd to such miscellaneous problems as arise in various types of business, 
rhe use of many ruled forms is an important feature. 

Course 36. Salesmanship and Advertising: (Summer Term and 
;pring Term of Second Year). This course includes the study of the laws 
tf appeal and response as applied to business; the advertizement in its 
omposition, form and efifectivness ; and the principles of salesmanship 
detail, wholesale, manufacturing, and personal). Text: Art of Selling, 
)heldon. 

Course 37. History of Commerce. The general history of business 
irogress is surveyd ; attention is given to the economic changes that hav 
aken place in the past century, and to the future outlook along the lines 

Course 33. Business Correspondence. This course is given in the fall 
if transportation, banking, commercial treaties, and world markets. 



^^ Annual Catalog and Course of Study 



V 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION > 

This department exists because the state needs as teachers men ai 
women of sound helth who ar traind to care for the physical welfare ' 
their pupils and set before them for imitation the example of a dignifi 
and erect bearing. ' 

Its aims ar two-fold: 

1. For the individual : to supply systematically one essential elemc 
in hygienic living, namely, muscular excercize; and to encourao-e as ' 
lated to this, proper habits of sleep, bathing, ventilation, and diet to cc 
rect common postural defects, and develop as accurate muscular conti 
as may be possible in the time available. 

2. For the teacher: to make clear the relation between helth a- 
efficiency, the hygienic demand for systematic excercize in elementary a. 
high school, and to supply a fairly comprehensiv equipment of practi-^ 
work for use in such schools. 

Three terms' work in physical training is required of all students ar 
every effort is made to adapt work to individual needs. This work is to . 
taken m the first year unless there be excellent reasons for postponino- 
A careful record of the helth history of each entering student is taken 1- 
a physical examination given. A special class is provided for those thv 
shown to be unequal to the work provided for the average beginner In t\ 
T^re cases where exercize even in this class is not suitable, individual woi 
is prescribed and sufficient observation of class work is assignd to enab 
the future teacher to conduct simple exercizes in the school-rooms an 
make intelligent use of games in the school years. 

For physical training women ar required to hav a regulation sui 
which should be orderd after arrival at a cost of $3 :7s. Every woma 
needs also an athletic skirt for tennis, hockey, and field work in Nature 
Study, Geografy, and other sciences. This may be orderd on arrival 
made at home. It should be strong, wide, and of shoe-top length, prefer 
ably navy blue or black. 

Men require for the gymnasium two black sateen shirts, gray trousers 
and black tennis shoes. These can be obtaind after arrival at a cost of noi 
more than $4.00. 



^ 



Illinois State Normal University 8l 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Course i. Gymnastics, folks dances, plays and games taught with con- 
ideration of their distinctiv effects and suitability for use in the school- 
oora or on the playground. Weekly lectures deal with personal care and 
ftical behavior. Especial attention is given to nose, throat, and teeth, bath- 
ing, posture, and dress. 
J Course i (A). Arranged for women whose helth history and physical 

(iests show them not redy for Course i. Enrolment wil be limited and spe- 
lial attention given to individual cases. Minor. 
I Course 2. Mere vigorous and difficult forms of gj-mnastics, dancing, 

^*^ [nd games. Apparatus work is introduced and a study of Bancroft's Pos- 
■■ ure Training of School Children is substituted for weekly lectures. Time 

jffj : 'equirement as for Course i. Minor. 

al 2l' Course 2 (A). A continuation of Course i (A). Two hourse a week 

sfn-iSts spent in observation of practical work and discussion of text. The 
femaining time is spent on special program of walks and prescribed exer- 
izes. Minor. 

Course 3. Posture training is continued during the first part of the 
ferm; gymnastics with hand apparatus and simple forms of esthetic danc- 
'ig ar introduced; organized games playd out of doors occupy a prom- 
iient place in this course. Three hours of exercize and two hours for dis- 
[ussion of principles, methods and teaching. Minor. 

I Course 3 (A). A continuation of Course 2 (A) with discussion of 
Liethods in teaching. Minor. 

[ Course 4 (Electiv). Outdoor sports, including volley ball, basket ball, 
l.ockey, tennis. Reading, discussion, and note books. Time required, same 
s preceding courses. Open to women whose physical tests show them 
qual to such work. Minor. 

' Course 5 (Electiv). Esthetic dancing is offerd twice a week during both 
yinter and spring terms. Students taking all this work receiv one minor 
redit. Note-books required. Open to all women qualified. Semi-minor. 
i Course 31. Gymnastic Teaching and Playground Management. The 
jirst six weeks of the term wil be devoted to principles and methods used 
[1 gymnastic teaching, and wil be arranged for those who wish to make a 
pecialty of physical training in elementary or high schools. During the 
emaining six weeks the possibilities of the playground, its organization 
nd equipment, wil be taken up. Playground activities wil be considered in 
iCtail, and w